Classical Music

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  • The earliest classical videos on Youtube?

    Slipped Disc
    norman lebrecht
    19 Apr 2015 | 9:48 am
    It will be ten years this week, April 23, 2005, that Youtube went live, and a while longer before it changed our lives. Started by three ex-PayPal guys — Steve Chen, Chad Hurley and Jawed Karim – it drew 65,000 videos in the first years and was sold to Google for $1.65 billion in November 2006. The inaugural video was posted by Karim. The next dozen were gloopy home vids. When did classical music make it onto Youtube? Quite soon. We found this from Julianna Yau in September 2006. And this from Mi-Young Lee two months later. The first professional concert may have been the…
  • Nightafternight playlist

    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise
    Alex Ross
    14 Apr 2015 | 5:49 pm
    New and recent releases of interest. — Szymański, Pieces for String Quartet, Mykietyn, String Quartet No. 2; Royal String Quartet (Hyperion) — Gesualdo, Tenebrae Responsoria; Philippe Herreweghe conducting the Collegium Vocale Gent (Outhere) — Mahler, Symphony No. 8, Wagner Overtures; Jascha Horenstein conducting the London Symphony and the Royal Philharmonic, and various other forces (Pristine) — Bernd Richard Deutsch, Mad Dog, String Quartet No. 2, Dr. Futurity; Enno Poppe conducting Klangforum Wien (Kairos) — Boulez, Livre pour Quatuor, last revision, 2012; Quatuor Diotima…
  • A few music books/journals for sale

    The Rambler
    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:23 am
    Friends, readers, colleagues – I’ve been having a small clearout of books, and I have a number of items that probably aren’t much use to the average Oxfam or secondhand bookshop, but which I’d rather not chuck straight out. Mostly musicology/music related. All of the below are available for a few pounds each (mostly to … Continue reading →
  • Met Opera: Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk

    Features - MPR News
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:01 pm
    We invite you to join us at 11 a.m. for a pre-recorded broadcast of Shostakovich's "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk" from New York's Metropolitan Opera.
  • The New Face Of Damage Control

    Adaptistration
    Drew McManus
    13 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    The Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) / Valentina Lisitsa firestorm is a good reminder that capable damage control and responsible flexing of social media muscle are important skills to develop and maintain. For organizations, damage control seems to be a lesson that is slow to matriculate. Remember the Richard Dare/NJSO crisis or the Detroit Symphony scrambling to backtrack on comments about hiring replacement musicians? Just wind your way through Adaptistration’s archives and you’ll find a litany of instances where orchestras ended up scrambling to catch up instead of getting…
 
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    Slipped Disc

  • The earliest classical videos on Youtube?

    norman lebrecht
    19 Apr 2015 | 9:48 am
    It will be ten years this week, April 23, 2005, that Youtube went live, and a while longer before it changed our lives. Started by three ex-PayPal guys — Steve Chen, Chad Hurley and Jawed Karim – it drew 65,000 videos in the first years and was sold to Google for $1.65 billion in November 2006. The inaugural video was posted by Karim. The next dozen were gloopy home vids. When did classical music make it onto Youtube? Quite soon. We found this from Julianna Yau in September 2006. And this from Mi-Young Lee two months later. The first professional concert may have been the…
  • 10 composers who smoked

    norman lebrecht
    19 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    1 Maurice Ravel on the go 2 Puccini lighting up 3 Mahler has a pull, in New York 4 Gershwin can’t compose without it 5 Not in rehearsal, Lenny, please… 6 Debussy, always at it 7 Arthur Honegger smoked a pipe 8 Arnold Schoenberg inhales 9 Sibelius, with cigar 10 DSCH gets a light all pictures from LebrechtMusic&Arts
  • What Mariss told the ‘secret’ press conference

    norman lebrecht
    19 Apr 2015 | 4:22 am
    On Friday, the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra launched its new season in front of a tiny gathering of hand-picked hacks. Most local and all international journalists were excluded. Mariss Jansons made two mild observations at the meeting. 1 Asked if he was in the running for the Berlin Philharmonic conductorship, he said: ‘We have to wait and see what happens on 11 May.’ 2 Asked about the decision to deny Munich a new concert hall, he replied: ‘Hopefully, politicians have understood they made a mistake.’ The orchestra announced a new website. It is almost as dull…
  • How Brian Couzens twice saved the record business

    norman lebrecht
    19 Apr 2015 | 3:44 am
    In the late 1970s, classical recording was in the doldrums. The same old conductors were re-recording the same old works, issued on LPs that were so faulty the customer return rate was over 40 percent. In November 1979, a father-and-son team of sound engineers from Essex, Brian and Ralph Couzens, founded Chandos Records. Sound quality was outstanding from the outset and the LP manufacture was vastly superior to the major labels, which were forced to upgrade their product. These differences were soon ironed out by the advent of CD in 1983, but the point was made and widely taken that Chandos…
  • Dresden reject is ‘in line’ for BBC Proms

    norman lebrecht
    19 Apr 2015 | 2:46 am
    We’ve had a tip-off from Lyon that Serge Dorny has been shortlisted for the vacancy of BBC Proms chief. The Belgian, who was sacked last year by the Semper Oper in Dresden before he could take up the job, has a history of talking up his chances for posts across the music world, so we need to take this tip with a chunk of salt. It may be no more than self-puffery. However, Dorny has form in the UK as a past head of the London Philharmonic Orchestra. He may have a few locals who are pushing his name for the Proms. He is unsettled at Lyon Opera and has chameleon qualities that may play…
 
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    Adaptistration

  • Time To Shop For A New Gig?

    Drew McManus
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    The weather’s warming up and that means some minds are starting to think about greener pastures. To that end, Adaptistration Jobs has openings in Salt Lake City, Nashville, Erie, San Fran Bay Area, Washington D.C., Fort Worth, Omaha, Seattle, Chicago, Baltimore, and more. And in case you missed the news from February, you’ll find more than orchestra and opera jobs at the site thanks to opening up the doors to all performing arts admin listings.
  • Are You Experimenting With Personal Live Streaming Yet?

    Drew McManus
    16 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    The live streaming provider wars have begun and the struggle to gain market dominance between Twitter owned Periscope and indie hit Meerkat is well under way. Playing out under all of this drama is the latest step in arts marketer evolution: just what the hell are we supposed to do with these platforms anyway?!? Tech journals are already profiling the benefits of tapping into the personal live streaming environment but not unlike other disconnects between mainstream commercial marketing and niche based arts marketing, the angle needed to turn personal live streaming into selling more tickets…
  • 2014 Readership Segmentation Survey Results

    Drew McManus
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    As promised from earlier in the month in a post that covered the sharp increase in Millennial readers, today’s installment will cover the reader survey results from all demographics. My apologies in advance for the relatively vanilla charts and graphs when compared with the Millennial article infographics, but the visual format is still a big step up from simple text based data. Demographics & Occupation We already know the Millennial demographic increased its share of the pie while Gen Xers increased a percentage point and Plurals plus Baby boomers both saw three percent dips.
  • Speaking Of Social Media Damage Control…

    Drew McManus
    14 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    In a timely coincidence with the recent Toronto Symphony / Valentina Lisitsa social media equivalent of Godzilla vs. Mothra, ArtsHacker Phil Paschke published an article on 4/12/15 that includes a social media response flow chart by Jonathan Michael at Bplans.com that should not only be a mobile device shortcut but printed out, framed, and sitting on the desk of anyone in this field tasked with managing their institution’s social media profiles. It’s such a good resource it should inspire envy for nothing thinking of it first. Read Ignoring The Online Anger @ ArtsHacker.com
  • The New Face Of Damage Control

    Drew McManus
    13 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    The Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) / Valentina Lisitsa firestorm is a good reminder that capable damage control and responsible flexing of social media muscle are important skills to develop and maintain. For organizations, damage control seems to be a lesson that is slow to matriculate. Remember the Richard Dare/NJSO crisis or the Detroit Symphony scrambling to backtrack on comments about hiring replacement musicians? Just wind your way through Adaptistration’s archives and you’ll find a litany of instances where orchestras ended up scrambling to catch up instead of getting…
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    NewMusicBox

  • OPERA American Awards $100,000 to 7 Female Composers

    NewMusicBox Staff
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:29 pm
    Discovery Grants aim to identify, support, and help develop the work of female composers writing for the operatic medium, raising their visibility and promoting awareness of their compositions.
  • Four Composers Chosen for 2nd Berkeley Symphony EarShot Readings

    NewMusicBox Staff
    16 Apr 2015 | 10:10 am
    This season, four composers will have a new symphonic work workshopped and read by Berkeley Symphony at the Osher Studio in Berkeley on May 2, 2015 at 3pm (the first public unveiling of the composers’ works in process) and on May 3, 2015 at 7pm (a run-through of the completed pieces).
  • Lost in Translation

    Trevor Gureckis
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:03 am
    Unlike composing concert music, in film and advertising a composer is tasked with writing music the audience wants, but sometimes that audience has trouble parsing what it wants.
  • 2015 Guggenheim Fellowship Awards Announced

    NewMusicBox Staff
    15 Apr 2015 | 8:25 am
    The Guggenheim Foundation has awarded fellowships to 175 scholars, artists, and scientists--among them 11 composers.
  • The Opposite of Brain Candy—Decoding Black MIDI

    Sam Reising
    15 Apr 2015 | 7:14 am
    "Black MIDI” refers to the moments in a piece where the notes, if displayed on a traditional two-stave piano score, are so dense that there appears to be just a mass of black noteheads. The increased density of notes also affects the computer, which is sometimes unable to process all of the notes within a particularly complex section. The goal of Black MIDI is to approach this processing failure without actually crossing that line.
 
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    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

  • Nightafternight playlist

    Alex Ross
    14 Apr 2015 | 5:49 pm
    New and recent releases of interest. — Szymański, Pieces for String Quartet, Mykietyn, String Quartet No. 2; Royal String Quartet (Hyperion) — Gesualdo, Tenebrae Responsoria; Philippe Herreweghe conducting the Collegium Vocale Gent (Outhere) — Mahler, Symphony No. 8, Wagner Overtures; Jascha Horenstein conducting the London Symphony and the Royal Philharmonic, and various other forces (Pristine) — Bernd Richard Deutsch, Mad Dog, String Quartet No. 2, Dr. Futurity; Enno Poppe conducting Klangforum Wien (Kairos) — Boulez, Livre pour Quatuor, last revision, 2012; Quatuor Diotima…
  • Boulez in America

    Alex Ross
    14 Apr 2015 | 9:03 am
    Mark Swed, in the LA Times, recently noted a shortage of American orchestral tributes to Pierre Boulez in his ninetieth-birthday year. The New York Philharmonic, Boulez's former base, programmed nothing by him this season; likewise the LA Phil. Instead, as Swed observed, on Boulez's birthday both orchestras were playing works by John Adams. As one who laments the mindlessness of calendrically generated programming — despite my love for Strauss and Sibelius, I am boycotting their one-hundred-fiftieth anniversaries — I can't register too strong a complaint, but the omissions…
  • Headline of the day

    Alex Ross
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:23 am
    John Adams will lead Leila Josefowicz and the Cincinnati Symphony in his striking new work Scheherazade.2 next week. The dedicated page on the Cincinnati's website provokes a wry smile. Adams is at least sufficiently well known that his name gets in the headline. I appreciate, of course, the challenges of marketing new music to mainstream audiences, and am happy to see that Cincinnati has taken on Adams's big new piece. They have a strong track record with contemporary music generally — witness the Music Now Festival. But the emphasis on Respighi seems strange, to say the least.
  • Adorno/Thomson

    Alex Ross
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:40 pm
    The scholar James Schmidt has made a fascinating discovery: the lost mansucript of Theodor W. Adorno's own translation of his Philosophie der neuen Musik has turned up in the papers of Virgil Thomson, at Yale. Adorno and Thomson occasionally exchanged letters; as I commented in a blog post last fall, they had certain ideological concerns in common. In The Rest Is Noise, I mentioned that at one point Adorno attempted to interest Thomson in his writings on Sibelius, provoking the immortal reply, "The tone is more apt to create antagonism toward yourself than toward Sibelius."…
  • Philharmonie de Paris

    Alex Ross
    12 Apr 2015 | 9:22 pm
    Surround Sound. The New Yorker, April 20, 2015. Image: John Singer Sargent, "Rehearsal of the Pasdeloup Orchestra at the Cirque d'Hiver."
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    Sequenza21/

  • Los Angeles Percussion Quartet – In Concert

    Paul Muller
    16 Apr 2015 | 12:23 pm
    Friday night, April 10, 2015 and Zipper Hall in downtown Los Angeles was the venue for a concert titled I Hold The Lion’s Paw featuring the The Los Angeles Percussion Quartet. A knowledgeable crowd gathered to hear four pieces of percussion music that included a world premiere. The first piece on the program was Mallet Quartet (2013) by Joseph Pereira, written for two vibraphones and two marimbas. Pereira writes about this piece: “Each pitch is considered on its own as a scale, of many timbral particles waiting to be examined. For the most part the focus is on the resonances, the…
  • Cuba Libre! Minnesota Orchestra Off to Havana

    Jerry Bowles
    13 Apr 2015 | 1:03 pm
    The Minnesota Orchestra is off to Cuba.  The historic May trip culminates with two performances in Havana, May 15 and 16 and will also include several musical exchanges between Orchestra musicians and students.  These will range from coaching sessions with high school and university student musicians to rehearsing with a Cuban youth symphony and playing jazz music with professional Cuban musicians. The Orchestra announced in February that it would perform in Cuba as part of the 19th annual International Cubadisco Festival this May, becoming the first U.S. orchestra to perform in Cuba…
  • Darcy Gets a Guggenheim

    Jerry Bowles
    10 Apr 2015 | 5:49 am
    Delighted to see one of our favorites,  Darcy James Argue, among the 2015 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship winners announced yesterday. The Guggenheim Foundation gives out annual fellowships in a range of disciplines including academia, the arts and science. The organization says they are “appointed on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise” and this year’s 175 scholars were drawn from a pool of 3,100 applicants. The organization’s website does not list the amount, saying that the grants vary, “taking into consideration the…
  • Early Music of Robert Ashley in Los Angeles

    Paul Muller
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    April 1, 2015 was the date and the REDCAT Theater at Disney Hall was the site of a concert by the Southland Ensemble of the early music of the late Robert Ashley. A full crowd was in attendance with only a scattering of empty seats. The Entrance (1965) was first on the program and this was video projected behind the stage showing a keyboard with stacks of pennies being placed on the keys. There were speakers in the back of the theater where the tones could be heard and as a new stack of pennies was to a key added the resulting tone could be heard entering what was a continuous chord. The…
  • The Wild Beasts in Pasadena

    Paul Muller
    3 Apr 2015 | 4:08 pm
    The spaciously comfortable sanctuary of the Neighborhood Unitarian Universalist Church in Pasadena, CA was the site for a concert titled gnarwhallaby: The Wild Beasts. On a pleasant Sunday evening, March 29, 2015, a nice crowd gathered to hear the six pieces on the program that included a world premiere. The concert was produced by People Inside Electronics and featured the formidable playing of the gnarwhallaby ensemble combined with historical as well as contemporary electronic sounds. A question and answer session preceded the concert and a brief history of gnarwhallaby was recounted. It…
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    Classical Performance Podcast

  • Ravel, with the Parker String Quartet

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    7 Apr 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Ravel, with the Parker String Quartet Maurice Ravel: String Quartet in F major Parker String Quartet: Daniel Chong, violin; Karen Kim, violin; Jessica Bodner, viola; Kee-Hyun Kim, cello Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, February 22, 2007 © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
  • Chopin, with Daniil Trifonov

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    10 Mar 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Chopin, with Daniil Trifonov Frederic Chopin: Etudes, Op. 25 Daniil Trifonov, piano Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, October 3, 2012 © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts Watch video of Daniil Trifonov in our studio Photo credit: Roger Mastroianni
  • Beethoven, with the Concord Chamber Players

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Beethoven, with the Concord Chamber Players Beethoven: String Trio in C minor, Op.9 No.3 Wendy Putnam, violin; Karen Dreyfus, viola; Mihail Jojatu, cello Recorded at the Concord Academy Performing Arts Center, September 26, 2004 © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts photo of Wendy Putnam courtesy of the Boston Symphony Orchestra
  • Arensky, with the new England Conservatory Chamber Orchestra

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    23 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Arensky, with the New England Conservatory Chamber Orchestra Anton Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky, Op. 35a NEC Chamber Orchestra Recorded at WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, February 14, 2011 © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
  • Handel, with Richard Egarr

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    9 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
 
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    JDCMB

  • Dinosaurs, brainwashing and bunkum...

    17 Apr 2015 | 2:21 am
    The other day I came across the expression "Music shouldn't be a Museum Culture" just once too often. I've got out my Amati Soapbox to explain why I think this clichéd phrase is a daft bit of pernicious brainwashing idiocy... http://magazine.amati.com/149-comment/comment-dinosaurs-brainwashing-bunkum.html
  • Royal Opera House 2015-16: JDCMB's top choices

    16 Apr 2015 | 3:50 am
    Yesterday the Royal Opera House held its big press conference to announce the new season. And it's a goodie. There was so much to announce that chief executive Alex Beard gently told Antonio Pappano he had to wind up his speech so they could move on. "I'm a Sir, and don't you forget it!" laughed the irrepressible music director.During the question session an American journalist asked about attendance figures. Some houses in the US have problems, he suggested, with actually getting people to go and see things. How are sales doing here? Kasper Holten, head of opera, told him that for the past…
  • A big step up for...

    14 Apr 2015 | 11:57 pm
    ...the brilliant young British-Australian conductor, Jessica Cottis, who has just been signed up for general management by Inverne Price. This is a Very Good Thing. Official info below.Jessica Cottis: equally at home with music old and newIf by their pedigree shall you judge a young conductor, Jessica Cottis is set to do great things. She has recently finished her tenure as Assistant Conductor at the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, first to Vladimir Ashkenazy and then to David Robertson, and previously she has assisted Donald Runnicles at the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra,…
  • Between Worlds: the premiere

    12 Apr 2015 | 4:03 am
    I reviewed ENO's world premiere last night of Between Worlds, Tansy Davies's new opera with librettist Nick Drake on the awe-inspiring topic of 9/11. The piece? Quite a lot of problems where different aspects were at odds with each other, but some of us wept anyway. The performance? Superb. My review is in The Arts Desk, here (£).
  • Now Tchaikovsky announces contestants

    12 Apr 2015 | 2:31 am
    Hot on the heels of Leeds, Moscow has declared its participants for this year's Tchaikovsky Competition. In four categories - piano (61 accepted), violin (50), cello (49), voice (40 male, 39 female) - there are only two from the UK, and they are both pianists: Oleksandr Grynyuk and Alexander Ullman (who is indeed going for 'the triple'). Quite a few non-UK nationals are studying here, though, including, we're told, six at the RCM.Among the female singers, all but nine of 39 are Russian. Your grasp of cyrillic, though, has to be rather good to determine exactly who they are. I find it somewhat…
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    Features - MPR News

  • Met Opera: Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk

    17 Apr 2015 | 10:01 pm
    We invite you to join us at 11 a.m. for a pre-recorded broadcast of Shostakovich's "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk" from New York's Metropolitan Opera.
  • Voces8: Helping the next generation

    17 Apr 2015 | 8:30 am
    Education has been at the heart of Voces8 since its inception. The group members see it as their responsibility to help the next generation have success in music and in school. Listen to audio and watch videos that demonstrate this commitment.
  • Moveable Feast: Rails and Trails

    16 Apr 2015 | 10:01 pm
    This week on Moveable Feast, John Birge and Minnesota Monthly's Rachel Hutton take a look at two different ideas for spring travel -- by rails and by trails.
  • A Walk in Beauty

    16 Apr 2015 | 12:45 pm
    David Mennicke leads the Concordia University, St Paul, Christus Chorus in two haunting works from a recent choir tour.
  • A sweet and dramatic score for 'Ori and the Blind Forest'

    16 Apr 2015 | 8:56 am
    After four years of soundtrack development, the score for the game 'Ori and the Blind Forest' rested on one composer's ability to unite new musicians and seasoned score professionals.
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    Ionarts

  • Perchance to Stream: Cherry Blossom Edition

    Charles T. Downey
    19 Apr 2015 | 11:35 am
    Here is your regular Sunday selection of links to online audio and online video from the week gone by. After clicking to an audio or video stream, you may need to press the "Play" button to start the broadcast. Some of these streams become unavailable after a few days. Watch Juan Diego Flórez and friends (Anna Bonitatibus, Ildar Abdrazakov, Vittorio Grigolo, Luca Pisaroni, and others), at the
  • Ionarts-at-Large: The Takács Quartet in Vienna

    jfl
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:10 pm
    The heart of chamber music of Vienna beats in the Mozart-Saal. But the offerings at the Brahms-Saal of the venerable, more famous Musikverein can be tempting, too… and if and when the Takács Quartet calls whence, the resident-ionarts unit will drop whatever he is doing and head over to hear one of our longest standing favorites. Even in an utterly conservative program such as they presented at
  • 'The tintinnabulation that so musically wells'

    Charles T. Downey
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:48 pm
    Sergei Rachmaninoff is a composer whose instrumental music often seems wandering and overlong to me. Not unlike his compatriot Tchaikovsky, whose ballets and operas suit me much more than his symphonies and concertos, Rachmaninoff seemed to benefit from the restraint of a text or story. This is likely why Kolokola, a choral symphony based on Edgar Allan Poe's evocative poem The Bells, is so
  • Martin Kasík at Czech Embassy

    Charles T. Downey
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:36 am
    Martin Kasík had his Washington debut in 2000, garnering a fine review for his Young Concert Artists-sponsored recital at the Kennedy Center, the same year he also played at 92nd Street Y in New York. The Czech pianist came back for a recital at the Strathmore Mansion in 2006, which I am sorry to have missed, based on the beauty of his playing on Wednesday night at the Embassy of the Czech
  • Ionarts-at-Large: Trio Wanderer in Romantic Redemption

    jfl
    16 Apr 2015 | 3:54 pm
    J.Haydn, Complete Piano Trios, Beaux Arts Trio Philips/Decca The Trio Wanderer is one of the ARD International Music Competition Prize Winner alumni that make that competition’s name in the chamber music field quite so prestigious. Their recordings (Best of 2009 here, Best of 2012 here, Messiaen) are of library-building quality, rivaled only by the Beaux Arts Trio and the Florestan
 
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    The Rambler

  • A few music books/journals for sale

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:23 am
    Friends, readers, colleagues – I’ve been having a small clearout of books, and I have a number of items that probably aren’t much use to the average Oxfam or secondhand bookshop, but which I’d rather not chuck straight out. Mostly musicology/music related. All of the below are available for a few pounds each (mostly to … Continue reading →
  • Contemporary highlights in the ROH 2015/16 season

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    15 Apr 2015 | 7:43 am
    I don’t always pay attention to the season announcements from Covent Garden, but the release today of details of next year’s season caught my attention for two good reasons: 1) Georg Friedrich Haas: Morgen und Abend I have my reservations about Haas’s music, yes, but he also does the big and dramatic better than most at the … Continue reading →
  • First Contemporary Music Festival at Rosenfeld Porcini Art Gallery

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    8 Apr 2015 | 3:45 am
    I’ve only just had my attention pointed to this, but this Friday and Saturday (10 and 11 April) there will be a miniature festival of contemporary music at the Rosenfeld Porcini Art Gallery, on Rathbone Street, Fitzrovia. Five concerts over the two evenings; works for solo instruments or duos/trios; features music by Crane, Skempton, Shlomowitz, Silvestrov, David … Continue reading →
  • Too soon for a 9/11 opera? Or about right?

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    6 Apr 2015 | 3:41 am
    “Is it too soon for an opera about 9/11?” asked Eddie Mair on Radio 4’s PM programme on Friday, previewing an item about Tansy Davies’ Between Worlds, which receives its premiere at ENO this week. A silly question: for one thing, it was redundant – Christopher Theofanidis’s Heart of a Soldier, the (true) story of … Continue reading →
  • Frank Denyer discussing his music

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:14 am
    I am grateful to Lawrence Dunn for alerting me to this – video documentation of Frank Denyer presenting his unique and wonderful music at Brunel University a couple of years ago. (Details of the original event here.) Supplement your viewing with Ben.H’s review of the new Denyer CD, just released on another timbre (link includes sleevenotes by the … Continue reading →
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    Opera Today

  • Green: Mélodies françaises sur des poèmes de Verlaine

    gary@operatoday.com
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:39 pm
    Philippe Jaroussky lends poetry and poise to the sounds of nineteenth- and twentieth-century France
  • J. C. Bach: Adriano in Siria

    gary@operatoday.com
    16 Apr 2015 | 10:18 am
    At this start of the year, Classical Opera embarked upon an ambitious project. MOZART 250 will see the company devote part of its programme each season during the next 27 years to exploring the music by Mozart and his contemporaries which was being written and performed exactly 250 years previously.
  • Bethan Langford, Wigmore Hall

    gary@operatoday.com
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:27 am
    The Concordia Foundation was founded in the early 1990s by international singer and broadcaster Gillian Humphreys, out of her ‘real concern for building bridges of friendship and excellence through music and the arts’.
  • A broken heart in a bloodstained nightgown

    gary@operatoday.com
    14 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
     
  • Tansy Davies: Between Worlds (world premiere)

    gary@operatoday.com
    14 Apr 2015 | 10:00 am
    An opera dealing with — or at least claiming to deal with — the events of 11 September 2001? I suppose it had to come, but that does not necessarily make it any more necessary.
 
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    Opera Today News Headlines

  • A broken heart in a bloodstained nightgown

    Gary
    14 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    By Phillip Larrimore [14 April 2015, The Charlotte Observer] Opera Carolina’s production of “Lucia di Lammermoor” at Belk Theater is elegantly set, handsomely lit, fleetly conducted, and sung with high virtuosity, especially among the principals. [More . . . . ]
  • Voices in space: Meredith Monk & friends construct musical cathedrals at 50-year anniversary concert

    Gary
    7 Apr 2015 | 9:23 am
    By Rebecca Lentjes [bachtrack, 5 April 2015] “The rhythm of words takes away from my sense of rhythm,” Meredith Monk explained after a riveting performance of her piece Things Heaven and Hell by the Young People’s Chorus of New York City. The third part of Ms. Monk’s 1992 work Three Heavens and Hells, this piece was one of only a handful to incorporate real words in the entirety of the four-and-a-half hour Meredith Monk & Friends celebration at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall last weekend. [More . . . .]
  • Beyond Falstaff in ‘Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor’: Otto Nicolai’s Revolutionary ‘Wives’

    Gary
    29 Mar 2015 | 4:26 pm
    By John R Severn [Music & Letters, February 2015] This article explores how Otto Nicolai and Salomon Hermann von Mosenthal’s Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor (Berlin, 1849) might contribute to an alternative reception history of Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor, in which the play’s unusual features—in particular the central role it gives to female agency, family life, and the natural world—are positively valued. [More . . . . ]
  • Scheherazade.2: Violin, cimbalom and female empowerment star in John Adams’ new work

    Gary
    29 Mar 2015 | 1:57 pm
    By Rebecca Lentjes [Bachtrack, 28 March 2015] John Adams has been known to draw inspiration from American writers—Walt Whitman, E. Annie Proulx—for his works, but his most recent composition, Scheherazade.2, is presented as a musical sequel of sorts to the sprawling Middle Eastern collection One Thousand and One Nights. Mr Adams explained at the piece’s world première on Thursday… [More . . . .]
  • Haydn’s Die Jahreszeiten in Istanbul

    Gary
    14 Mar 2015 | 1:55 pm
    By Robert Hugill [Planet Hugill] Joseph Haydn’s last oratorio Die Jahreszeiten (The Seasons) was conductor Sascha Goetzel's choice for the first oratorio performance by his Borusan Istanbul Phiharmonic Orchestra in the Istanbul Lütfi Kirdar ICEC on Thursday 12 March 2015. Goetzel and the orchestra were joined by soloists Miah Persson, Ian Bostridge and Duncan Rock, and the Salzburg Bach Choir. [More . . . . ]
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    grecchinois

  • Throwback Thursday: Oleg and Pierre

    nick
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:26 pm
    Oleg Bryjak, centerA quick throwback Thursday post on two fronts. Firstly, remembering the bass-baritone, Oleg Bryjak, who was among the 150 passengers on the Germanwings flight that crashed in the French Alps on Tuesday.  I had the chance to sing with Oleg back in 2010 during a production of Rossini's L'Italiana in Algieri at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein.  Oleg was a wonderful colleague - smart, funny, and an incredibly strong singer with an impressively agile and powerful voice, he was truly fearless on stage. All of the news about this Germanwings plane is more…
  • Old Lutes

    nick
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:35 am
    See how happy he is, playing his lute?The text of the second song in Britten's Songs from the Chinese, 'The Old Lute', which Eliot Fisk and I performed recently at the Menil Collection with Da Camera of Houston, has been nagging at the back of mind since our concert a few weeks ago. The Old LuteOf cord and cassia-wood is the lute compounded;Within it lie ancient melodies.Ancient melodies weak and savorless,Not appealing to present men's taste.Light and colour are faded from the jade-stops;Dust has covered the rose-red strings.Decay and ruin came to it long ago,But the sound that is…
  • Michigan-inspired Serenades

    nick
    23 Jan 2015 | 7:22 am
    Post-performance shot backstage with the amazing David CooperIn a way, if one thinks about it, much of Britten's music after 1939 is, in a way, inspired by my home state of Michigan.  One night, in a hotel room in Grand Rapids, the relationship between Britten and Pears escalated from a professional friendship to the intense romance that knit the two together for the rest of Britten's life.  A quote from one of Pears' later letters to Britten:"I shall never forget a certain night in Grand Rapids -- Ich liebe dich, io t'amo, jeg elske deg(?), je t'aime, in fact, my little…
  • Pink Elephants

    nick
    20 Jan 2015 | 8:50 pm
    A week from tonight, I'll be performing with guitarist, Eliot Fisk, with Da Camera of Houston. The program is comprised of music performed by Sir Peter Pears and the famed guitarist, Julian Bream - who accompanied Pears with increasing frequency towards the end of Britten's life, the period when Britten wasn't anymore able to accompany Pears in recital due to the deterioration of his right hand after undergoing heart surgery in 1973. Bream and PearsThe program opens with a song that I initially thought was just a simple silly song, but has over the past couple of months given me pause.
  • Beginnings / Illuminations

    nick
    9 Jan 2015 | 6:24 pm
    So...I only logged in one solitary post here in 2014. The main reason for this is that 2014 was quite simply an incredibly busy year.  I mean that in the sense that it was both incredible and it was busy.  That said, I've not totally abandoned this blogging thing in any way whatsoever.  I simply took a bit of a hiatus.  Hiatus over.I've had the subject of beginnings floating around in my head as 2014 turned into 2015 - it's a topic that frequently occupies my mind around this time each year.  Perhaps that is a large part of why I feel compelled to end this holiday…
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    The Collaborative Piano Blog

  • Simon Lepper Talks About What It Takes To Be An Accompanist And Why the British Are So Awesome At It

    Chris Foley
    28 Mar 2015 | 7:10 pm
    I'm very glad to have recently made the acquaintance of Simon Lepper, the Head of Piano Accompaniment at the Royal College of Music in London. In an interview from a recent Vrije Geluiden episode, Simon talks about the British tradition of accompanying and how collaboration works so well with the British psyche. What particularly resonated with me was the way Simon explained how poetry informs his approach to the keyboard.Kudos go to Vrije Geluiden for how they are able to bring to life the immediacy of classical music with such a contemporary and genuine context. If only this approach could…
  • Wendy Hatala Foley and I Will Be Performing This Saturday at the Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts

    Chris Foley
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:36 am
    When Wendy and I lived in Vancouver, we performed together all the time. Astonishingly, since we moved to the Toronto area in 2002, we have never yet shared the stage for a concert. Wendy quickly got work in the opera, symphony, and described video fields, while I've been mostly busy with the worlds of contemporary opera and piano pedagogy.Each year, the Oakville Symphony holds several outreach events to introduce younger audiences to the instruments and voices that they will hear throughout the symphony's season. On Saturday, March 28, Wendy and I will be performing two free concerts at the…
  • The 2015 Edition of the Royal Conservatory Piano Syllabus is Now Online

    Chris Foley
    23 Mar 2015 | 8:05 am
    After several years of preparation, writing, performing, producing, finalizing, proofreading, editing, and amending, the 2015 Edition of the Royal Conservatory Piano Syllabus is finally available in pdf form, with the print edition soon to follow in music retail stores across North America.This Piano Syllabus will form the foundation of piano studies in the United States and Canada for thousands of students, teachers, adjudicators, and examiners over the next 7-8 years.It was an honor to have collaborated with so many brilliant individuals in the preparation of this syllabus, and my…
  • A Huge List of Famous Music Students, Organized by Teacher

    Chris Foley
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:33 pm
    AfricanAmericanPianoLessonvia Wikimedia CommonsMusicians are like Zen masters: it's all about the lineage. Wikipedia's List of music students by teacher is a useful way to understand the delicate strands that are interwoven between the bonds of teacher and pupil throughout the centuries.It's also a great way to settle late-night bets about who studied where and with whom.
  • Liz Upchurch Talks About How to Be a Vocal Coach

    Chris Foley
    15 Mar 2015 | 4:51 am
    I'm a big fan of the work of Liz Upchurch and it was a very pleasant surprise to see her interview with Jenna Douglas of Schmopera: Singing from the keyboard, bringing your experience as an instrumentalist to the studio, and respect for the singer's art are all touched on. I hope that a lot of young pianists are inspired by Liz's words.
 
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    parterre box

  • “Need I say more?”

    La Cieca
    19 Apr 2015 | 8:39 am
    Thanks to a serendipitous online copy-editing kerfuffle, Miss Jessye Norman (not pictured!) grants to the Financial Times what can only be described as the definitively definitive Diva Interview . (In fact, the unabridged version is even funnier.)
  • Exactly what it says on the tin

    WindyCityOperaman
    19 Apr 2015 | 8:24 am
    On this day in 1927 Mae West was sentenced to ten days in jail for obscenity for her play Sex. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yJajJ_B5R4 Note: this posting may also serve as your “Intermission Feature” location for the week. Born on this day in 1892 composer Germaine Tailleferre http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTU3d9ugQK4 Born on this day in 1892 tenor Walter Widdop http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4Ka60FRTOs Born on this day in 1908 conductor Joseph Keilberth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WBssalEqH4 Happy 91st birthday mezzo-soprano Hertha Topper…
  • Tired business, man

    WindyCityOperaman
    18 Apr 2015 | 8:06 am
    On this day in 1955 the legendary flop musical Ankles Aweigh opened at the Mark Hellinger Theater, inspiring Walter Kerr to write in the New York Herald Tribune, “Some of us have been campaigning lately for a return to the old fashioned, slam-bang, gags-and-girls musical comedy. Some of us ought to be shot.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0baouAKGm4E Born on this day in 1819 composer Franz von Suppé http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eCKfu8x8Xo Born on this day in 1882 conductor Leopold Stokowski http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdIlF_tGsJ4 Born on this day in 1899 conductor Zdenek…
  • The grandeur that was Rome

    La Cieca
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:27 am
    Some thoughts about the perishability of opera productions follow. Not necessarily a new argument, but let’s see what you think. I think there is absolutely a place for “classic” productions in an opera house with the condition that the original director or a designated “revival” director be on hand to customize the production to new casts and the changing tastes of audiences. After about 20 or 25 years, though, I question whether even the best productions can speak as directly to an audiences as they did when new: the world changes and people have different…
  • The singing fool

    WindyCityOperaman
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:33 am
    On this day in 1912, Al Jolson‘s recording of “Ragging the Baby to Sleep” was released. Within a year it sold more than one million copies, making it the first (unofficial) “gold record.”  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqmwV7ATUNo Born on this day in 1912 soprano Marta Eggerth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lcRDwKAoHI Born on this day in 1914 soprano Janine Micheau http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTyJu8xPiMM Born on this day in 1927 soprano Graziella Sciutti http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUYjzqxCNyI Happy 75th birthday soprano Anja Silja…
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    The Wagnerian

  • The Ring Cycle Tarot

    4 Apr 2015 | 9:16 pm
    There has, of course, been, what seems, an endless number of differingly themed tarot decks. It would be easy to blame the the occult revival of the  Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn for this, but only a quick glance at the history of the tarot deck (or should that be decks?) would show that it has always been so. In more recent times, there have been many such decks based on "popular" culture - both officially and unofficially.  For example The Star Wars Tarot and at least two Lord Of The Rings themed tarot decks. It may come as some surprise then, given…
  • New Issue Of The Wagner Journal Published

    4 Apr 2015 | 8:03 pm
    March 2015 issue (vol.9, no.1) of The Wagner Journal, which contains the following articles: • 'Where's the Drama?': Personal Reflections on the Intersection of Music and Theatre in Wagner Performance by David Breckbill• Knappe oder Ritter? A study of Gurnemanz by Peter Quantrill• Wagner and Science: Twilight of the Gods Across the Multiverse by Mark B. Chadwick• The Rosebush Pictures of Wagner's Daughter Isolde by Dagny R. Beidlerplus reviews of:Tristan und Isolde at Covent GardenLohengrin in Zurich and AmsterdamDas Rheingold in British ColumbiaParsifal in TokyoCD recordings of a…
  • Salome (1923) - from Oscar Wilde's play - silent with English intertitles

    6 Mar 2015 | 2:32 pm
    Not Wagner of course, but would there have been this opera without Wagner? Whatever the answer, Salome, is perhaps one of Strauss' greatest works - if not the greatest opera of the 20th century. This is not the opera of course, but the 1923 Silent movie of Wild's play. More interestingly, this uses a single set based on Aubrey Beardsley's illustrations for the published play.Salomé (1923), a silent film directed by Charles Bryant and starring Alla Nazimova, is a film adaptation of the Oscar Wilde play of the same name.Salomé is often called one of the first art films to be made in the…
  • ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK AND RICHARD WAGNER

    6 Mar 2015 | 1:51 pm
    ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK AND RICHARD WAGNER Jarmila GabrielováAbstract: The essay deals with the relation of prominent Czech composer Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904) to the personality and work of Richard Wagner (1813–1883). As opposed to the common opinions linking Dvořák’s name with Wagner‘s ideological opponents and placing his ‘Wagnerian’ period in the early phase of his career only, our examination shows that Dvořák’s interest in Wagner and his music was of deep and lasting nature and was significant for him throughout the whole of his life.Today, more than a hundred years…
  • MYTH & LEGEND IN WAGNER'S TANNHÄUSER

    6 Mar 2015 | 1:21 pm
    It is more difficult than one might first suspect to find good, or indeed interesting, analysis of Tannhäuser. With that in mind, we were more than pleased to find the following three part series of articles dedicated to this very work. Written by the  Karl E. H. Seigfried from a presentation he gave recently on  Tannhäuser at the Lyric Opera of Chicago  and the Wagner Society of America. We present just a brief snippet form part one below. However, the entire three part article can be read in its entirety over at the author website by following thee links below."Wagnerians…
 
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    Kenneth Woods- conductor

  • Has social media turned music’s back to the audience?

    Kenneth Woods
    10 Apr 2015 | 6:15 pm
    “Social media.” It’s a phrase we use so often that it’s easy to forget how uneasily the words “social” and “media” sit together. When I see the word “social,” I think of friends and family, of person-to-person contact. I think of the people with whom I share interests, beliefs or background. When I see the word “media,” I think of large-scale technological systems for disseminating ideas, information and entertainment to the general public. The social media revolution was supposed to give individuals a voice in shaping the content of the media, and in the early years…
  • Nine reasons you might just get away with a mistake in concert

    Kenneth Woods
    8 Apr 2015 | 3:08 pm
    So you made a mistake on the gig yesterday. I feel your pain. We all make mistakes- I made a real howler twice in the same place on a cello gig recently and it’s been bothering me ever since. Mistakes are a controversial and painful subject for musicians. Nobody likes making them, and nobody likes hearing them (except, occasionally in a nasty, Schadenfreude-ish way). Some people think avoiding mistakes is the most important thing a musician can do- this attitude is far too common at orchestral auditions and competitions. It creates a musical climate where caution is king. Blech! On the…
  • International Record Review- The Last Word

    Kenneth Woods
    6 Apr 2015 | 2:58 am
      The news that International Record Review magazine has been forced to stop publishing following the death of Barry Irving is a blow for everyone in the classical recording industry. I met Barry only briefly at a couple of CD launches. He struck me as a very nice man who had invested a great deal of blood, sweat and tears in keeping the magazine going in difficult times. And a fine magazine it was. Of all the major review magazines, it’s focus was the narrowest- there was almost nothing in it about concerts or personalities. No puff pieces or profiles- just lots of reviews,…
  • CD Review- Gramophone Magazine on Franck, Falla and Turina Concertante works for Piano with KW, Valerie Tryon and the Royal Philharmonic

    Kenneth Woods
    12 Mar 2015 | 6:41 am
    Critic Bryce Morrison writes in the Gramophone:  Throughout her long and distinguished, if insufficiently acknowledged career, Valerie Tryon has remained true to her own lights. Virtuoso teasers such as Balakirev’sIslamey and Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit fell effortlessly within her grasp and here in Franck’s Symphonic Variations, sandwiched between two Spanish favourites of the repertoire, she commences a series of recordings for the Somm label. Accompanied by a ringing endorsement from Somm’s Siva Oke (‘Valerie became the yardstick by which I measured most other pianists over the…
  • KW Too many records in March International Record Review

    Kenneth Woods
    4 Mar 2015 | 3:30 am
    From the current issue of International Record Review. A wonderful magazine every music lover should subscribe to. Condolences to everyone there on the death of Barry Irving, the magazine’s founder and publisher, who died last month after a short illness                  
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    Iron Tongue of Midnight

  • Stats

    17 Apr 2015 | 5:04 pm
    Nothing like slagging a popular recitalist/opera singer and a famous music festival to boost your page views for the week!This week's minor obsession is Schubert's D. 343, "Litanei auf das Fest Aller Seelen" (Litany for the Feast of All Souls). After listening to a half-dozen or so performances, I'll own that Ian Bostridge is very good in this; the song's demand for a perfect line brings out the best in him, a kind of concentrated, hushed singing that suits the song well. (Text and translation are here; score is here.)Consider, also, that Schubert was 19 when he wrote this one. Such is…
  • Coming Up: West Edge Opera's I Due Foscari

    17 Apr 2015 | 4:58 pm
    After the great success of Poliuto, I am looking forward to hearing WEO's I Due Foscari, an early Verdi work that's been revived here and there recently....because Placido Domingo wanted to sing the baritone role. I know enough early Verdi to want to hear all of it, so this is a great opportunity.Here are the details from the press release:Verdi's I Due FoscariSunday, May 3, 1 pmRossmoor Event Center, 1010 Stanley Dollar Drive, Rossmoor, Walnut CreekMonday, May 4, 8 pmFreight and Salvage 2020 Addison Street, BerkeleyWith:Roy Stevens, baritoneMichael-Paul Krubitzer, tenorMelody King,…
  • London Friday Photo

    17 Apr 2015 | 12:01 am
                                                Spitalfields, left; Fleet Street, right.May, 2014
  • April 15, 1865

    15 Apr 2015 | 4:22 am
    1When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom’d,And the great star early droop’d in the western sky in the night,I mourn’d, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,And thought of him I love.2O powerful western fallen star!O shades of night—O moody, tearful night!O great star disappear’d—O the black murk that hides the star!O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me!O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.3In the dooryard fronting an old…
  • Ojai Music Festival, You Should Be Embarrassed.

    14 Apr 2015 | 9:56 am
    I've just gotten a press release from the Ojai Music Festival, trumpeting the next three music directors, who are:Peter Sellars, 2016Vijay Iyer, 2017Esa-Pekka Salonen, 2018If you take a look at a complete chronological listing of Ojai music directors, you'll find that in 1988, Diane Wittry was co-director, with Nicholas McGegan and Peter Maxwell Davies, in 1998 Mitsuko Uchida was co-director with David Zinman, and in 2011, Dawn Upshaw was music director. Many of the men who've been music directors are repeats, including Lukas Foss, Pierre Boulez, Salonen himself, Kent Nagano, MTT, and…
 
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    Musical Assumptions

  • Ging heut Morgen übers Feld

    19 Apr 2015 | 9:01 am
    I just returned from a most glorious morning spring rain walk. It seemed as if every single flower on every single tree was either in blossom, about to blossom, or was in the process of releasing its blossoms to the ground. Everything was quiet except for the sound of rain and the sound of birds. The trees were simply drinking in the water, and I was protected by my umbrella and my rain boots. Every once in a while I would stop in front of a flowering tree and watch the movement happening in the tree. Though I didn't actually see it happen, I felt that the flowers were opening up before my…
  • Robert Freeman's The Crisis of Classical Music in America: a minority opinion

    12 Apr 2015 | 9:20 am
    I'm surprised to find almost nothing but praise on the Internet for Robert Freeman's 2014 The Crisis of Classical Music in AmericaRobert Freeman was educated at the Milton Academy, Harvard, and Princeton, taught at Princeton and MIT, and served as an administrator at Princeton, Eastman, New England Conservatory, and the University of Texas. Part memoir and part handbook, the book has chapters aimed towards specific audiences: parents of young musicians, current college students, college faculty, deans, provosts and presidents, and foundation directors. There is some excellent advice about…
  • "Have something interesting to say . . ."

    10 Apr 2015 | 5:29 am
    Kenneth Woods has something interesting to say about making mistakes and getting second chances:Believe it or not, having an interesting musical point of view is, in my experience, the rarest quality in musicians, and also the most important. Anyone can be derivative, literal, formulaic or wayward. If your take on the Beethoven Violin Concerto sounds just like Mutter’s or Perlman’s but with more mistakes, then the mistakes really count. If you’re doing lots of attention-seeking “musical” stunts, any mistakes will also attract maximum attention. There’s no shortcut to an…
  • Plop and Pop: Creating a Reliable Left Hand Position on the Violin and Viola

    9 Apr 2015 | 7:27 am
    Much of what I know about violin and viola playing comes from practice, obsessive observation, and intuition. A lot of it comes from my experience as a wind player; particularly my experience with the recorder, and a lot of it comes from advice I learned from friends who happen to be great musicians. I have never been "trained" as a Suzuki teacher. If I were to identify with a "school," it would be the rather dowdy Samuel Applebaum "school" because that is the method I used to learn to play the violin when I was a child.I have been teaching students my "Plop and Pop" method for about ten…
  • Tap the World with Ben Leddy!

    7 Apr 2015 | 7:12 pm
    Our son Ben wrote this fantastic patter song that will teach you the countries and territories of North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe in less than four minutes.
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    an unamplified voice

  • A Verdi soprano

    JSU
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:50 pm
    I wanted to wait until I finished a full review of the several Don Carlo performances I've seen in the past weeks, but that may take a while to get to. So, a quick word on Wednesday night's house debut of Lianna Haroutounian.Simply put, she is a real Verdi soprano -- already the most exciting and appropriate in these middle-weight parts besides Sondra Radvanovsky (who has other mountains to climb next season). Haroutounian is not yet (and may never be) the tragedienne Barbara Frittoli is and was as Elisabetta, but from start to finish the scope and physical thrill of her voice was revelatory,…
  • The suitors

    JSU
    30 Mar 2015 | 2:00 pm
    I've been absent for a while, so let's go backwards.Ernani - Metropolitan Opera, 3/20/2015Meli, Meade, Domingo, Belosselskiy / LevineThe presence of superstar tenor turned embarrassingly amateur conductor turned hit-and-miss baritone Placido Domingo is no longer the most notable thing about a production. But perhaps he catalyzed what struck me so strongly on this night: the palpable attention, long familiar here but absent from shows I've seen this season, of the Met audience that recognized itself as such. The sounds and silences (and you can sense it best in the quiet) of a crowd sure in…
  • Met Council Finals 2015

    JSU
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:10 am
    The program is above. Singers discussed below in order.Deniz Uzun (mezzo, 26)This German (by way of Indiana University) singer, like most of this year's lineup, showed a quite promisingly expressive timbre, solid from top to bottom (where she directed a number of her elaborations) with threads of quick vibrato. The performance, though, was a bit herky-jerky, both in body -- it seemed that most of the singers had decided to flap their limbs around on stage -- and, more worrisomely, in phrase. The Rossini just seemed uncoordinated, phrases going hither and thither, but the Carmen aria suggested…
  • Eva outside Paradise

    JSU
    13 Dec 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Metropolitan Opera, 12/02 & 12/09/2014 Morris/Volle, Dasch, Cargill, Botha, Appleby, Kränzle, König / LevineThis revival, which has three more shows after this afternoon's moviecast matinee, is simultaneously an unmissable representation of Wagner's masterwork and a relative disappointment that leaves out much significance. Which aspect is more evident will, of course, depend on your familiarity, expectations, and priorities.The success is, I suppose, more remarkable. The Met managed - on rather shorter notice than usual - to find not one but two excellent…
  • Midlife

    JSU
    6 Oct 2014 | 4:30 pm
    Macbeth - Metropolitan Opera, 9/24/2014Lucic, Netrebko, Calleja, Pape / LuisiThis was, despite what seems to be generally positive press, a dispiriting night at the Met. It hasn't been that long since Anna Netrebko was the wonder of the Mariinsky's 1998 tour, a bel canto soprano of limitless beauty and promise (as one can hear from Gergiev's Bethrothal in a Monastery and Ruslan & Lyudmila recordings), but that silver-voiced singer never really sang with this company -- at least not past her official debut in 2002's War and Peace. Netrebko returned in the late-Volpe/early-Gelb era a different…
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    On An Overgrown Path

  • Music of things

    17 Apr 2015 | 2:07 am
    In 2015 the big new technology trend is the 'internet of things'. In this the focus shifts from software to physical objects, with digital technologies moving from being an end in themselves to a tool that increases the utility of 'things' such as cell phones, coffee makers, washing machines and wearable devices. The internet of things provides an interface between the physical and virtual world, and its emergence sends the important message that no matter how clever the technology, digital solutions can only enhance and not replace physical interactions. This message needs to be taken on…
  • To everything, turn, turn, turn

    16 Apr 2015 | 3:08 am
    Classical music's pursuit of the dollar into regions controlled by despotic regimes has long been a preoccupation on this blog, with the uneasy marriage of art and politics in the Gulf States receiving particular attention. To date On An Overgrown Path has been a lone voice on this topic, so I was heartened to find my esteemed fellow blogger Norman Lebrecht joining me in taking a critical position on classical music's exploitation of the petro-dollar. In a new post on Slipped Disc* about the purchase of a crystal encrusted Steinway by an oil sheikh, Norman rails against the Qatari regime with…
  • This is my radio

    15 Apr 2015 | 1:53 am
    Three months into the role, the new controller of BBC Radio 3 Alan Davey has revealed his vision to rejuvenate the station and make it relevant in an age of multiple media. At the centre of his vision is bringing back the Pied Piper programme last heard in 1976, and winding back the clock on the breakfast programme by dropping the vox pop contributions from listeners. When I explained last year why classical radio must change or die, I incurred the wrath of the Friends of Radio 3 by suggesting they advocated that Radio 3 presenters should once again wear dinner jackets while on air. It now…
  • Classical music is lone art and not crowd art

    12 Apr 2015 | 9:39 am
    Loneliness has been the reason behind the creation of many masterpieces of art and literature, but compared to the general picture of lonely people and their miseries, these are only exceptional cases. We have missed seeing this most important of human conditions as a talent, as an inward concentration to be used for, rather than against, a human's well-being. We teach, from kindergarten through the universities, all sorts of useful lessons to children. Reading writing, arithmetic and hundreds of other subjects are taught in schools, to be used on small occasions in life, but no occasion…
  • The Orthodox Veil

    10 Apr 2015 | 12:45 pm
    One day during 1986 Steven Isserlis rang me up. I had never heard of him; he was apparently a cellist. He said, 'I'm a Jew, I'm a Russian Jew. My father is Russian. I love your music. I particularly love the Russian Orthodox qualities that it has. Although I'm a Jew, I'm not a practising Jew. I always go to the service of Easter in the Orthodox Church, because I love the music so much and I love the ceremonies. I just wonder whether you could write a piece for cello and orchestra that has some connection with the Orthodox music that I love so much.' Of course, if another kind of cellist had…
 
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    Naxos New Releases

  • Piano Recital: Fischer, Thomas - CERVANTES, I. / FONTANA, J. / GOTTSCHALK, L.M. / LECUONA, E. (Cuba Piano) (8.551297)

    6 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
  • HENZE, H.W.: Il Vitalino Raddoppiato / Violin Concerto No. 2 (Sheppard Skærved, Longbow, Parnassus Ensemble, Henze) (8.573289)

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Henze’s Violin Concerto No. 2 occupies a space between the theatre and concert stages. A dramatic work with a rôle for a speaker, it comes from the period of his interest in ‘action music’ and is scored for a large experimental chamber orchestra. Equally Janus-faced, but very different, is the Italianate Il Vitalino raddoppiato, vividly coloured and overtly romantic ‘chamber music’ that looks back to the example of Tomaso Vitali. The Concerto is heard in an archive performance conducted by the composer, and this volume concludes Peter Sheppard…
  • Brass Septet Music, Vol. 2 - HANDEL, G.F. / PURCELL, H. / RAMEAU, J.-P. / BLOW, J. (Septura) (8.573386)

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    This second volume of Septura’s brass chamber music series takes us back to the 17th century and the music of Baroque opera, in four contrasting works by Rameau, Blow, Purcell and Handel. The astounding variety in content, colour and character of the originals demands especially inventive arrangements, and these pieces are vividly brought to life by incorporating stylistic elements from ‘period performance’. The exhilarating result is a stunningly virtuosic set of new Baroque works for brass. Volume 1 is available on Naxos 8.573314.
  • VILLA-LOBOS, H.: Symphony No. 12 / Uirapuru / Mandu-çarará (Sao Paulo Symphony, Karabtchevsky) (8.573451)

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Villa-Lobos’ Symphony No. 12, his last, was completed on his 70th birthday and shows no lessening of his powers, marrying symphonic craftsmanship with explosive energy, harmonic richness, and rhythmic vitality; a fitting summation of his symphonic canon. Uirapuru is one of his most original works, couched in a modernism that teems with colour and creates a specifically Brazilian sound world without drawing on folkloric elements, whilst Mandu-Çarará is a notably inventive, lush, and exciting but little-known secular cantata.
  • BRIAN, H.: Symphonies Nos. 6, 28, 29 and 31 (New Russia State Symphony, Walker) (8.573408)

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Havergal Brian’s extraordinary late creativity is almost unparalleled in musical history. Between the completion of Symphony No. 6 in 1948 and the end of his compositional life two decades later he wrote 26 symphonies. No. 6 marks a crucial point in his adoption of more concise forms and economy of expression in its single-movement span, a process taken even further in the brief but free polyphonic fantasia of No. 31. In Symphonies Nos. 28 and 29 Brian turned to the classical four-movement model but one which is wholly and idiosyncratically re-imagined. The intensity and even savagery…
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    The Naxos Blog

  • Blind date

    Naxos-FC
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    All recitalists on concert tours face the speed-dating issue of having to become intimate with a hall’s peculiar acoustics as quickly as possible. For pianists, there’s the extra demand of courting the character of an entirely new instrument to ensure that performer, instrument and music all click in good time for their one-night stand. Boris Giltburg describes a pianist’s emotional roller-coaster in making such a brief encounter. Every musician has a special connection with their instrument, yet for pianists there’s an extra dimension: whereas all others (excepting organists) play…
  • Prelates and preachers

    Naxos-FC
    10 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    So, it’s confirmed that Sir Simon Rattle, currently artistic director of the Berlin Philharmonic, will be winging it to London in 2017 to take up the post of music director of the London Symphony Orchestra. Reporters have been at pains to ask, and Rattle has taken every opportunity to deny, that his acceptance of the post was dependent on the building of a shiny new concert hall, another of our veritable temples to music, often kitted out with a mammoth organ to reinforce the solemnity and spirituality of the whole musical experience. As with most ensembles nowadays,…
  • Podcast: The Kernis Kaleidoscope

    Naxos-FC
    3 Apr 2015 | 12:00 am
    Raymond Bisha introduces us to the eclectic and exuberant imagination of the American composer Aaron Jay Kernis, whose works are inhabited by a host of influences – musical, historical and personal. This new disc of three of his diverse compositions features deliciously titled works in delectable performances by Andrew Russo, James Ehnes and the Albany Symphony Orchestra. Album details… Catalogue No.: 8.559711
  • Sounds unusual

    Naxos-FC
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    There’s nothing unusual about any musical instrument to the person who is its master. But if you look at those commonly played by concerto soloists, there’s only a handful that have a repertoire of hundreds of works at their disposal. When asked to think beyond the many famous examples for violin or piano, for example, other masterpieces spring much less readily to mind, even from amongst the most familiar orchestral sections. Interestingly, the Holland Festival has announced an initiative to ‘Save the Bassoon’ in its 2015-16 season and use eight short world première…
  • Podcast: Poised purity. Poulenc’s choral settings.

    Naxos-FC
    20 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    Raymond Bisha introduces the latest Naxos recording of the Elora Festival Singers in performances of Poulenc’s unaccompanied choral works. Transcending a backcloth of geopolitical and personal turmoil, these gems marry a delicacy of form with harmonic pungency, described by conductor Noel Edison as “like putting a stained glass to song.” Album details… Catalogue No.: 8.572978
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    Classical CD Reviews

  • Raffi Besalyan: The Return

    Gavin Dixon
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
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  • Bruckner 3 Skrowaczewski London Philharmonic

    Gavin Dixon
    8 Apr 2015 | 3:20 am
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  • Schnittke Symphony No 3 Jurowski

    Gavin Dixon
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:07 am
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  • Strauss Feuersnot Schirmer

    Gavin Dixon
    18 Mar 2015 | 7:17 am
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  • Bruckner Symphonies 6 7 Jansons

    Gavin Dixon
    3 Mar 2015 | 1:40 am
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    Classical CD Reviews

  • Raffi Besalyan: The Return

    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
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  • Bruckner 3 Skrowaczewski London Philharmonic

    8 Apr 2015 | 3:20 am
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  • Schnittke Symphony No 3 Jurowski

    30 Mar 2015 | 6:07 am
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  • Strauss Feuersnot Schirmer

    18 Mar 2015 | 7:17 am
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  • Bruckner Symphonies 6 7 Jansons

    3 Mar 2015 | 1:40 am
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    Rosebrook Classical

  • News Updates

    Rosebrook Classical
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:58 pm
    Despite the radio silence on our blog, it’s been a pretty busy start for 2015! We’ll try to recap a […]
  • Rosebrook Classical Clients Nominated for Four ICMAs!

    Rosebrook Classical
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:44 pm
    A quick word of congratulations to Rosebrook Classical Clients, Delos Productions and Reference Recordings! The labels combined for four nominations […]
  • New Robert Greenberg OraTV Promo!

    Rosebrook Classical
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:37 am
    The promo for the new Robert Greenberg OraTV Series, Scandalous Overtures has been released! From RobertGreenbergMusic.com: Together with OraTV CEO […]
  • New Website — Robert Greenberg

    Rosebrook Classical
    19 Aug 2014 | 9:43 am
    These are exciting times to be following Robert Greenberg! Not only does he have new composition premieres this season, he […]
  • New RC Video — Carolyn Enger Plays Copland’s Down a Country Lane

    Rosebrook Classical
    2 Jul 2014 | 8:08 am
    A fun new video to celebrate one of America’s greatest composers before the 4th of July weekend — Copland’s Down […]
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    Artiden

  • Finding Your Next Passion Project

    Grace Miles
    3 Apr 2015 | 10:09 pm
    These days, I only think about attending church when in need of kindness. Like, if I feel that I’ve let people down; but today, I’d rather hunt for Easter eggs. Which brings us to passion projects. A passion project gives you a glimpse into how a person manifest interests, takes control in an area they believe in. (Only new […]
  • How I Beat Stage Fright

    Grace Miles
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:00 am
    While most people can play piano in their room, the magic of the stage can be too much to handle. Ten minutes before my design event, my hands were shaking at the thought of people having woken up on a Saturday morning because of me. I’d printed cue cards (which I have never done, and will likely never do […]
  • 6 Light & Expressive Piano Pieces for The “Easy Days”

    Grace Miles
    26 Mar 2015 | 12:45 pm
    If you’re like me, a state of busy-ness doesn’t keep you away from music. In fact, it might turn you towards music for slight refuge. Today, I’d like to share some light and expressive piano pieces I’m itching to play this summer, plus my first composition in a long time (really, it’s more of a […]
  • If you’re having a bad day, read this.

    Grace Miles
    13 Mar 2015 | 6:43 pm
    My piano teacher would pretend to barf when I botched a piece of music. She’d say that Beethoven would rise from his grave to strangle me, her favourite question being all variations of, Why? Why would you play the rhythm this way? Why are you crying? She was in her fifties and was to undergo surgery for those large, glaring eyes. We’d clap sonata […]
  • 12 Pretty Chinese Piano Solos

    Grace Miles
    3 Mar 2015 | 10:13 am
    Asian music was based on the pentatonic scale. This was true for Chinese music, at least. I spent hours copying characters in Chinese school, and although the same pen strokes require more effort now, I can look back to that time of utter dedication for filling the square boxes with unending characters. It was like drilling music. On […]
 
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    Grand Piano Passion™

  • The Wurlitzer

    Guest Writer
    13 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    In this literary short story by Christi Craig, a piano tuner reluctantly turns up at the house of a flighty woman who has no appreciation for her Wurlitzer.
  • Inaugural Conference for Musicians with Hearing Loss

    Guest Writer
    30 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    As the Association of Adult Musicians with Hearing Loss announces its first conference, the founder recounts growing up as a hearing-impaired music student.
  • Creating the Layers of an Intricate Painting

    Guest Writer
    16 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    Contributing Artist Annika Connor uncovers the process of how her painting Augustus was created, from outline to filling in negative space to adding color.
  • Debussy’s Sarabande from Pour le Piano in Video

    Guest Writer
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    Playing the Sarabande from Debussy's Pour le piano is like losing yourself in an Impressionist painting. Shirley Gruenhut performs the piece in this video.
  • Bach French Suite No. 4 Amplified

    Michael Brazile, Contributing Editor
    16 Feb 2015 | 2:00 am
    The Bach French Suite No. 4's Allemande is relatively short, making its contrapuntal demands on the player manageable; get tips on how to play the piece.
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    Classical Commentary: Barry Lenson's Classical Music Blog

  • Earth, Wind & Fire and Baroque Performance Norms

    Barry Lenson
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:24 am
    A while ago I really enjoyed Les Intouchables, a charming French sidekick movie about an unlikely friendship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic man and Dris, his African-born physical therapist. The theme music for the film is “September,” a song by the band Earth, Wind & Fire. And then later in the movie comes a feel-good scene when Dris leads a group of staid Parisians as they dance to that same song. It’s fun, right? I have to admit that until I saw that movie, I had hardly heard of Earth Wind & Fire.  I guess that during the years when they were topping the…
  • Did George Gershwin Orchestrate his Own Compositions? And Should We Care?

    Barry Lenson
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:40 am
    Back when I was in conservatory, I heard lots of students and faculty members dismiss George Gershwin (1897-1938) on the grounds that, “He couldn’t even orchestrate his own compositions.”I was reminded of that opinion the other day when I was listening on my car radio to “Catfish Row,” an orchestral suite from Gershwin’s opera Porgy and Bess. Boy, are those melodies wonderful. Boy, is that orchestration good. But I was unsettled to realize that the orchestration of that work simply sounds a lot different from that of An American in Paris,which has been getting a lot of air time…
  • Buy Your Tickets Today for the Chicago Bach Project’s St. John Passion on March 20

    Barry Lenson
    24 Feb 2015 | 7:11 am
    A year ago I encouraged my readers in Chicago to reserve tickets early for an upcoming performance of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion that took place at the Harris Theater. Some Chicagoans did just that and told me afterwards that the performance, conducted by John Nelson, was exceptionally inspiring.  Apparently John von Rhein, the music critic at the Chicago Tribune, agreed. In his review of Maestro Nelson and that performance, he wrote . . ."He led a splendid team of soloists, chorus and orchestra in a fervent, moving account of one of the great monuments of Western music. This was the…
  • Carl Orff, Hockey Composer

    Barry Lenson
    5 Feb 2015 | 1:57 pm
    I went to see the New Jersey Devils play the Pittsburgh Penguins last week, and I have a piece of advice to offer you. If you are a musician or a music-lover who values your hearing or your sanity, you should never attend a professional hockey game.  The volume of sound is cranium-cracking. The hair-curdling music and organ-playing and midi files pause only momentarily while the game of hockey – remember that was why you attended? – is actually taking place.  When play is not happening, there is not one second when fans are not being manipulated or motivated or marketed to with…
  • Why Does Music Sound Like Music the Way It Does? Part II: Modes

    Barry Lenson
    27 Jan 2015 | 12:37 pm
    “Mode” can be defined as the arrangement of notes within a musical scale – the sequence of whole tones and half tones within an octave. In ancient times, both Plato and Aristotle believed that music that had been composed in different modes would cause listeners to feel different emotions. Later, in the 6th century, a Roman philosopher/theorist named Boethius attempted to reconstruct what those Greek modes were. Then a few centuries after that, early church musicians used the modes identified by Boethius to define modes that could be used to write Christian liturgical music.Different…
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    Stars & Catz » Classical Music & Opera Buzz

  • PBO and SF Opera Adlers + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    18 Apr 2015 | 10:40 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Indigenous soldiers inspire anthem – www.dailytelegraph.com.au THE unsung indigenous heroes who have fought for Australia will finally get their recognition with a new John Schumann song. Continue Reading On www.dailytelegraph.com.au » PBO and SF Opera Adlers – operatattler.typepad.com * Notes * A number of San Francisco Opera Center’s Adler Fellows […]
  • John Malveaux: Barbara Sherrill now lives in Atlanta but her YouTube piano recording of AMAZING GRACE has provided inspiration to me. + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:09 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Not funny – Mahler Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt – classical-iconoclast.blogspot.com Is Mahler’s song,  Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt,  from Des Knaben Wunderhorn,  meant to be funny ?  On the surface, it’s droll, but as with so much good art, it’s not a good idea to judge by surface […]
  • Ambitious Royal Opera House 2015/2016 season + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:39 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Lost in Translation – www.newmusicbox.org Unlike composing concert music, in film and advertising a composer is tasked with writing music the audience wants, but sometimes that audience has trouble parsing what it wants. Continue Reading On www.newmusicbox.org » Time and again I would try to say – parterre.com Our […]
  • ArtsBeat: In Lecture, the Conductor Alan Gilbert Gives Job Description, Lauds New Music + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:12 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Rome opera house finds harmony with cost cuts and state cash – www.reuters.com ROME (Reuters) – Rome’s opera house has brought down the curtain on years of losses and infighting and started breaking even after cutting costs, taking special state funds and reaching a peace deal with fractious employee […]
  • SoundBox 2, Zellerbach Recital Hall, San Francisco — review + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    13 Apr 2015 | 8:40 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   The Official Classical Chart – www.classical-music.com Rating:  0 Week ending 11 April 2015   1 Monteverdi: Vespers of 1610 The Sixteen/Harry Christophers Coro COR16126 Buy from Amazon Download on iTunes RE 2 The Beethoven Journey – Piano Concertos Leif Ove Andsnes Sony Classical 88843058872 Buy from Amazon Download on iTunes       […]
 
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    The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source

  • FLASHBACK FRIDAY | Gil Shaham, 1991 – 20 Years Old, Sibelius Violin Concerto [VIDEO]

    admin
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    1991 archival footage of a then 20 year old Gil Shaham performing the 1st movement of Sibelius Violin Concerto – with conductor Adam Fischer and the NHK Symphony GIL SHAHAM | SIBELIUS VIOLIN CONCERTO | 1ST MVT | ADAM FISCHER | NHK SYMPHONY | 1991 The post FLASHBACK FRIDAY | Gil Shaham, 1991 – 20 Years Old, Sibelius Violin Concerto [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source.
  • Eastman School’s Ying String Quartet Announce New 1st Violinist

    admin
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:17 pm
    The Eastman School of Music-based Ying String Quartet has today announced 28 year old Robin Scott as their new 1st violinist – replacing Ayano Ninomiya, who will stand down from the ensemble after 5 seasons. A graduate of the New England Conservatory and Indiana University, Robin is a former prize winner at the Menuhin, Klein and Stulberg International Violin Competitions – and has previously served as Concertmaster of the New York Classical Players and as Guest Principal Second Violin of the St Paul Chamber Orchestra. “Robin is both an insightful, creative musician and top-shelf…
  • Leipzig Quartet to Replace Arrested Violinist Due to Travel Restrictions

    admin
    16 Apr 2015 | 3:45 pm
    The Leipzig String Quartet has today announced that Mattias Wollong, Concertmaster of the Staatskapelle Dresden, and Raphael Chris, Principal 2nd Violinist of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra will replace arrested violinist Stefan Arzberger for the next two weeks. Arzberger, 42 was arrested and released on US $100,000 bail in a New York City court on March 27th – after it has been alleged he attempted to strangle a 64 year old female hotel guest at the Hudson Hotel, on Columbus Circle. A spokesperson for the Quartet has earlier made claim that “ the episode happened after someone…
  • THROWBACK THURSDAY | VC ‘Young Artist’ Fédor Roudine – 11 Years Old, Rondo Capriccioso, 2004 [VIDEO]

    admin
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:54 am
    Archival footage of the then 11 year old Russian-French VC ‘Young Artist’ Fédor Rudin performing Saint-Saens’ ‘Introduction & Rondo Capriccioso’ – with Maestro Plamen Djouroff and the Sofia Soloists Chamber Orchestra. FEDOR ROUDINE | SAINT-SAENS | INTRODUCTION & RONDO CAPRICCIOSO | DJOUROFF | SOFIA SOLOISTS | 2004 The post THROWBACK THURSDAY | VC ‘Young Artist’ Fédor Roudine – 11 Years Old, Rondo Capriccioso, 2004 [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source.
  • Rochester Symphony Orchestra President Resigns Amidst Theft Allegations

    admin
    14 Apr 2015 | 3:58 pm
    The Rochester Symphony Orchestra, in Minnesota has today announced the resignation of its CEO & President, Jeffrey Amundson – midst allegations he stole more than $19,000 from a vulnerable adult. Court papers filed in a Minnesota County Court, in February revealed the 45 year stood to face four counts of Financial Exploitation of a Vulnerable Adult – accused of stealing from an alleged victim, over a 3 year period, whilst acting as the man’s power of attorney. On February 3rd of this year, the orchestra announced Amundson would be placed on paid administration leave, pending…
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    Stephen P Brown

  • How to build the colossal fan club you need

    stephenpbrown
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:01 am
    Gone are the days a newsletter costs a fortune – send it via email! Perhaps the biggest factor of my own success as a musician, is the people that support me regularly. There are a few hundred folk who love what I share with them, and who go out of their way to send me positive words, buy my music (live and online), and have a laugh on social media. Some of these folk found me online. Others I met through friends and neighbors, but most of my regular fans grew from attending live concerts. I hope you are one of them – if not now, then soon! And according to my last few Annual…
  • #PsalmQuest 43 progress 1: Harmonics

    stephenpbrown
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Click on the image to enlarge   Our new #PsalmQuest composition is well underway with an interesting feature: harmonics. Harmonics on a string instrument are very similar to double-stopping (see #PsalmQuest 41 progress report 4) but with a slight difference: Instead of two fingers holding down two different strings, both fingers are on the same string with the lower note pressed firmly against the fingerboard, and the higher note just pressed very lightly against the string – not enough to ‘stop’ it from vibrating, but to create two separate vibrating lengths of string.
  • #PsalmQuest 43 planning

    stephenpbrown
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
      Having now established what psalm 46 is all about (its ‘theme’) it is time to plan the actual composition. Click here to see my plan notes To be honest, I am still a little undecided regarding the structure of this composition. I would like to incorporate the element of music called “Timbre” and to do that it makes sense to use similar material in different ways to demonstrate the different timbres, or quality of sounds. But then the piece becomes about musical technique rather than a psalm. Perhaps Longman & Garland’s structure of psalm 46 is most conducive:…
  • #PsalmQuest 43 research

    stephenpbrown
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    “Be Still” by Ellen Jones The next psalm in my quest is number 46. I am undecided if this psalm will be for just solo violin, or for violin and piano duet. The psalm contains one of the most famous phrases known “Be still and know that I am God.” Let’s find out what it’s about: Click here to read Psalm 46 Ellen Jones (artist) titles her visual representation of psalm 46 “Be Still” Click here to read Frank McEleny’s poem based on psalm 46. R.E.O White titles his narrative on this psalm “God Is With Us.” Longman and Garland call…
  • #PsalmQuest 42 picture

    stephenpbrown
    14 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Each #PsalmQuest composition is represented online by a picture. The pictures are used on the composition’s description page, its audio file pages as well as in the free MIDI-generated videos. Some of them are my own photos, but most are sources from Flickr. When starting an advanced search on Flickr there is an option to choose photos that are covered by a Creative Commons copyright license. These licenses permit various degrees of use for free, sometimes even commercially. However, none of the photos are included in the #PsalmQuest sheet music that is sold on my website and therefore…
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    The Amati Magazine

  • Find us on social media…

    Jessica Duchen
    18 Apr 2015 | 2:49 am
    Dear Reader, we’re out there! We want to make it even easier for you to find our regular updates, so in case you’re not already following us on Twitter or Facebook, here are the links. Follow or like or both. And you can of course register to receive our content by email – just fill in your email address in the “subscribe” box. Whatever floats your boat. Remember, our articles are up here in perpetuity – so if you enjoy what you see on the front page, do explore the category links for more (hopefully) delectable reading matter on music, musicians and…
  • REVIEW: Joyce DiDonato (mezzo-soprano), Jake Heggie (piano), Brentano Quartet

    Peter Quantrill
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Milton Court Concert Hall, London, 14 April 2015 Pleasing synergy in the storytelling as Joyce DiDonato joins forces with the sympathetic Brentano Quartet Joyce DiDonato. Photo: Pari Dukovic Reynaldo Hahn’s Venezia is a store-wrapped gift of a song-cycle for a mezzo of such dramatic inclinations as Joyce DiDonato, who can wrap Italian vowels around throaty, essentially Spanish vocal lines, reflecting Hahn’s mixed parentage (and not forgetting the German in there: if Verdi was Joe Green, Hahn was Prince Chicken). She had an easy, understated way with the gondolier rhythm of No.1, the…
  • COMMENT: Dinosaurs, brainwashing and bunkum

    Jessica Duchen
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:09 am
    Jessica Duchen has seen the phrase “Music shouldn’t be a Museum Culture” a few times too many… An iguanodon skeleton in London’s Natural History Museum. Photo: Trustees of the Natural History Museum You know the notion that if you repeat something often enough it becomes true? Actually it doesn’t. It just means you stop thinking about what it means. You parrot it without any understanding of its implications, its realities or the fact that its repetition ad infinitum is a form of brainwashing. The music world is full of little gems of brainwashed rubbish and…
  • NEWS: Radical overhaul for Royal College of Music

    Jessica Duchen
    16 Apr 2015 | 2:02 am
    An impression of the planned new RCM foyer. Credit: John Simpson Architect The Royal College of Music in London has announced radical plans to transform its South Kensington home with a redevelopment costing some £25m. The architect John Simpson is to create the design and HRH Prince Charles, president of the RCM since 1993, has pledged to be patron of the associated fundraising campaign, More Music. The plans aim to develop the courtyard at the heart of the college’s buildings and to create two state-of-the-art performance spaces with full digital facilities, plus more practice…
  • YOUNG ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Jonathan Mann, conductor

    Amati Q&#38;A
    15 Apr 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Jonathan Mann has come a long way since his first violin studies in Cardiff. Now he is a conductor in Thailand, working in some inspiring outreach projects in the Bangkok slums   What are your earliest musical memories? How did you first start wanting to be a conductor?  My earliest memories are of my dad playing the violin. I grew up in Cardiff, where he is a violinist in the BBC National Orchestra of Wales. My mum would take me to their rehearsals at St David’s Hall, Cardiff, when I was a toddler. I used to stand on my plastic lunchbox and conduct along with a chopstick. Mum…
 
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    CMUSE

  • Pianist starts concert series for parents and carers of autistic children

    Jordan Smith
    18 Apr 2015 | 12:15 pm
    Two concerts aimed at parents and carers of children and young people suffering from autism will take place in the UK over the next month. They are part of the Jamie’s Concerts series founded in 2004 by acclaimed Japanese pianist Noriko Ogawa. The performances, which are the first Jamie’s Concerts to be held in the UK since 2012, will be held in Manchester on 22 April and London on 5 May. Noriko Ogawa came up with the idea of Jamie’s Concerts after staying with a family with an autistic child. (Image: Milena Mihaylova) As anyone who has brought up a child with autism will know, it…
  • Study to look in to new concert hall for London

    Jordan Smith
    18 Apr 2015 | 6:04 am
    The British government revealed at the end of February that it was supporting a feasibility study in to constructing a new purpose-built concert hall in London. Reports have suggested that the project would combine educational and rehearsal facilities along with a performance auditorium and could cost upwards of £200 million. The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO), is currently based at the Barbican Centre, but the suitability of the venue has been called in to question, even though it has undergone recent renovations. The investigation is due to last six months and is being led by the Barbican…
  • Do you have what it takes to play in the Berlin Philharmonic?

    Jordan Smith
    18 Apr 2015 | 5:39 am
    The Berlin Philharmonic is one of the leading orchestras in the world with a powerful tradition going back decades. Now they are hiring, and that’s not just for the position of chief conductor following the departure of Sir Simon Rattle. The orchestra’s website is advertising two positions for violinists, a principal horn, high horn, principal trumpet and contra-bassoon. Requesting highly qualified applicants, some of the requirements to be considered include a Mozart concerto for the violins, and Mozart’s concerto K495 and Strauss’ first horn concerto for both horn positions. An…
  • Pop Stars Pay Tribute To Beach Boy Legend Brian Wilson

    D Grant Smith
    18 Apr 2015 | 5:22 am
    Tribute shows may come and go, but few will shine as brightly as the memorable night in LA where pop stars from different musical paths paid tribute to Beach Boy legend Brian Wilson. The famed Fonda Theater hosted Brian Fest: A Night To Celebrate The Music Of Brian Wilson, featuring landmark performances by Kesha, Pop-Jazz sensation Norah Jones, Wilson Phillips, Flaming Lips and others. Brian Wilson, Beach Boys (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images) Sisters Carny and Wendy of Wilson Phillips were among the musical features to pay homage to the surf rock legend, while also performing a cover of In…
  • Pipe Organ History at Westminster Abbey

    Cynthia Collins
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:46 am
    Pipe organs have been part of the majestic history of Westminster Abbey for hundreds of years. The current organ, made by the organ builders of Harrison and Harrison, was installed in 1937 for the Coronation of George VI. Since that time, it has also been used for the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, weddings and funerals of members of the royal family and others, special events, as well as daily religious services and weekly organ recitals. Image of Harrison and Harrison pipe organ at Westminster Abbey The first known account of an organ in the history of Westminster was in 1304 and…
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