Classical Music

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Music as a bridge between form and the formless

    On An Overgrown Path
    28 Jun 2015 | 10:45 am
    It was only when I stood on the Aswan High Dam and looked south across Lake Nasser that I really understood the tragedy of the Nubian people. Beneath more than 2000 square miles of water lie the Nubian homelands that were flooded when the dam was built in the 1960s, and between the dam and Aswan are the soulless villages that the Nubians were resettled in. Hamza El Din (1929-2006) - seen above - made it his mission to preserve the Nubian culture that was being extinguished by the waters of Lake Nasser. He was born in the Nubian village of Toshka which was flooded when the High Dam was built.
  • To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade? A Notation Software Update

    NewMusicBox
    Bill Holab
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:14 am
    There have been big changes in the notation software market in recent years, and a lot of people are confused about what is going on and what the future might hold. So here are a few updates (if not upgrades) from the land of music notation software.
  • Unlimited Music Online vs. My Old Record Collection

    Classical Commentary: Barry Lenson's Classical Music Blog
    Barry Lenson
    23 May 2015 | 5:05 am
    I promise that I am not going to write a post today about how wonderful things used to be when I was young and how awful they are today.  You wouldn’t want to read that kind of BS and frankly, I’m not interested in writing about it either.What I do want to write about, however, is how today’s streaming and video access to classical music – all we could want, anytime – is changing the way people encounter classical music for the first time. And of course, how they continue to interact with it over the course of their lives. Is the “new order” better or worse than the old? I…
  • You can't write that because it will deter sponsors

    On An Overgrown Path
    4 Jul 2015 | 3:51 am
    My intention to leave the hot potato of the ethics of funding alone has been blown out of the water by the letter in the Guardian from composers and academics opposing BP's sponsorship of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. What role ethics should play in classical music sponsorship has been a recurring and often unpopular theme On An Overgrown Path over the years. A series of posts here in 2011 explored classical music's ethically compromised sponsors and in 2012 two posts shifted the spotlight onto BP. One of these highlighted the sponsorship by BP of Jonathan Harvey's Weltethos - the…
  • First comes morality, then comes the belly

    On An Overgrown Path
    2 Jul 2015 | 12:40 am
    Ibn 'Arabi told how "I follow the religion of love wherever the camels turn". Recently my similar but far more modest search took me to the city of Guelmim in southern Morocco. Guelmim, which holds a weekly camel market, is known as the 'gateway to the desert', and is the capital of the Guelmim-Es Semara region which includes southern Morocco and the disputed northern Western Sahara. South of Guelmim is the territory of the Sahrawi people; the city is the base for many brave activists supporting the oppressed Sahrawi's, and I wrote about the Sahrawi musician and activist Aziza Brahim in 2012.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Slipped Disc

  • These musicians won’t take a cent from this sponsor

    norman lebrecht
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:07 pm
    A very long list of musicians has written to the Guardian, telling the Royal Opera House not to accept sponsorship from the oil company, BP. We wonder, with respect, how they heat their houses, drive their cars… and why they clamour for public subsidy from bad Governments. Below the list of names. And here’s the letter.   John Luther Adams Composer Paul Griffiths Opera librettist and writer Simon Holt Composer and professor of composition, Royal College of Music Trevor Wishart Composer Maja Ratkje Composer Jem Finer Composer Boff Whalley Composer Georgina Born Professor of…
  • ‘My name is Vittorio. I’m a (tenor and) sex addict’

    norman lebrecht
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:59 am
    Signore Grigolo has been talking to Italian Vanity Fair. Indiscreetly. I’m difficult to be with. I believe in fidelity, but that’s easier said than done. I like women. Yesterday I went out with a friend and he asked me how was it possible not to fall in love and become imprisoned by a woman; I told him, “Fall in love with another.” Read more, click on Gramilano.
  • Countertenor ties the knot

    norman lebrecht
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:48 am
    Happens all the time. But not with a Supreme Court justice as the officiant. Congratulations to David Daniels and William Scott Walters. Full story here.
  • Yannick seeks new clarinet and flute principals

    norman lebrecht
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:31 am
    Just in: he Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra – with music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin – is one of Europe’s top orchestras. Every year the orchestra gives over 100 concerts, ranging from appearances in Rotterdam to major foreign tours, for audiences totalling more than 150,000. The orchestra’s ambition is to bring symphonic music to as broad a public as possible. In addition, the orchestra focuses on adventurous and innovative projects. The orchestra is based at ‘De Doelen’ in Rotterdam.For our orchestra we are looking for talented, flexible and committed musicians who work…
  • Berlin Phil launches Free Kirill site

    norman lebrecht
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:27 am
    In an attempt to introduce the world its shy incoming chief conductor, the orch has cobbled together a microsite with two video interviews and two concerts. It’s free til the end of next month. Click here.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Adaptistration

  • The IRS Moves One (Tiny) Step Closer To Open Source 990 Data

    Drew McManus
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    The 6/30/2015 edition of The Chronicle Of Philanthropy has an article by Suzanne Perry (h/t Joe Patti) that reports on the legal battle over making Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 990 filings available in “machine-readable format.” Granted, that phrase covers a lot of ground so don’t expect the final result to measure up to open data standards but at least this is a step in the right direction, even if it is moving at a glacial pace. The decision came by way of Federal Court and as of now, there are no provisions for converting existing 990s. We examined this issue in…
  • Some Good Thinking On How To Present Sensory Friendly Events

    Drew McManus
    2 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    When it comes to performing arts and inclusion, one of the more recent issues is introducing elements related to structuring events around attendees with disabilities or developmental differences, especially families with Autistic members. To that end, Sarah Marczynski published a wonderfully informative article at ArtsHacker.com on 7/1/2015 about that very topic that does an excellent job at walking you though the topic if its new to you then diving into a good bit of detail. Marczynski provides first-hand experience along with a wealth of additional resources. A sensory friendly concert…
  • Introducing Venture Arts Incubator

    Drew McManus
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    I’m very pleased to announce the official launch of Venture Arts Incubator (VAI), an incubator exclusively for businesses that cater to the arts field. VAI’s Success Is Measured By Participant’s Success Far too often good business ideas die early deaths due to a lack of resources and support during critical startup and stabilization phases and business plans end up looking like this: Step 1: create business Step 2: ?????????????? Step 3: PROFIT! When putting VAI together, it was crucial to help arts focused businesses figure out that second point so one of the primary goals…
  • New And Improved Orchestra Compensation Resources

    Drew McManus
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    Now that the 2015 Orchestra Compensation Reports are all wrapped up, it was time to update the compensation reports index page, which is where you can find direct links to articles in the annual series stretching back to 2005, that’s eleven years of articles! The new compensation reports index page features a graphic interface that works even better than before on mobile devices. You can also find an updated Financial Reports index page which has a mobile friendly update along with an updated DOA link form to report any URLs that no longer connect directly to the respective…
  • How The Supreme Court Ruling On Same-Sex Marriages Will Impact Orchestras

    Drew McManus
    29 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    In the wake of the landmark United States Supreme Court ruling on Obergefell v. Hodges, employers that offer spousal benefits will be required to do so for same sex couples. An article in the 6/26/2015 edition of The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) by Rachel Emma Silverman reviews the FAQs that impact employers as a whole and is a good resource for orchestras. By and large, orchestras are comparatively progressive employers in that a number of institutions in states that previously banned same-sex marriage and/or denied same-sex partners spousal benefits have already adopted measures to circumvent…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    [listen]

  • interview: jason eckardt

    Steve Hicken
    9 Jun 2015 | 3:46 am
    I talked (via email) with Jason Eckardt about the music on his new CD Subject and about his music in general. His answers to some pretty specific compositional questions are open and thought-provoking. The interview is up at BurningAmbulance.
  • second place is the first loser, loser

    Steve Hicken
    7 Jun 2015 | 10:13 am
    Over at On An Overgrown Path, the always-thoughtful Bob Shingleton has a post about the current binary cultural paradigm "forces everything - including art - into the dualistic framework of 0 or 1, good or bad". (Links within quotes from Mr. Shingleton are present in the original.) This dynamic is one in which "[a] classical work is either a masterpieces or an also ran, and as a result audiences are denied permission to like unfamiliar music".One of my missions in writing about concert music has been to try to open up the cultural space for our music, especially for new music.
  • jason eckardt - subject

    Steve Hicken
    28 May 2015 | 4:50 am
    Burning Ambulance has my review of Jason Eckardt's new CD, Subject, Since BA doesn't include disc details as a heading, here they are:ECKARDT: Subject; Paths of Resistance; Trespass; Flux; Tongues. Tony Arnold, soprano; Alice Teyssier, Eric Lamb, flutes; Grace Hong, oboe; Andrew McCollum Campbell MacDonald, clarinets; Wendy Everett, bassoon; Danielle Bogacz, horn; Matthew Jenkins, Ross Karre, percussion; Marilyn Nonken, piano; Jordan Dodson, Daniel Lippel, guitar; Erin Ponto, harp; Christopher Otto, Ari Streisfeld, Yuncong Zhang, Jeffrey Young, violin; John Pickford Richards, Hanna Shaw,…
  • just because they say it's music doesn't make it music; but it's not music because i say it's not music!

    Steve Hicken
    24 May 2015 | 12:18 pm
    A few days ago, Alex Ross posted a piece by Amadeus Regucera called  obscured-distorted-redacted, performed by the great JACK Quartet. Blogger A. C. Douglas not only took exception to the piece itself, but also to Alex posting it as music. I can think of no non-subjective (or extremely prescriptive) definition of music that Mr. Regucera's composition fails to meet, and Mr. Douglas offers no support for his assertion that that it is not in fact music.As to the piece itself, It's got some very good stuff in it, especially in terms of texture. It may be a little long for what…
  • a thousand flowers

    Steve Hicken
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:49 pm
    Is this one flower or two? Beats me. At any rate, we need at least 998 more.Thanks to the good offices of Will Robin, 21st century orchestra music has taken over Facebook and Twitter, under the hashtag #21cOrch. I've listened to a good bit of this music over the last few weeks, and I have to say that I've been impressed with both the wide stylistic diversity of the music and with its quality. Whether I like a given piece or not (which is one of the least important aspects of writing about music), it's great to take note of the vitality in the field.When I was in school the last thing anyone…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    NewMusicBox

  • To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade? A Notation Software Update

    Bill Holab
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:14 am
    There have been big changes in the notation software market in recent years, and a lot of people are confused about what is going on and what the future might hold. So here are a few updates (if not upgrades) from the land of music notation software.
  • Charlie Morrow: Wearing Different Hats

    Frank J. Oteri
    1 Jul 2015 | 7:02 am
    The variety of activities that Charlie Morrow has been involved in for more than half a century is staggering even by today’s standards, when the wearing of numerous hats is almost a pre-requisite for being successful as a composer.
  • New Music USA Awards $287,050 to 54 Projects

    NewMusicBox Staff
    30 Jun 2015 | 10:42 am
    The 54 awarded projects include concerts and recordings as well as dance, film, theater, opera, and more, all involving contemporary music as an essential element.
  • Realizing Unrealized Projects

    Aaron Holloway-Nahum
    29 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    A lot of our most highly funded institutions and visible organizations are dominated by quickly aging visions of making music. This stretches from professional ensembles and orchestras to the academies and conservatories where future musicians are trained.
  • One of Our Brothers as Well as a Bright Light—Remembering James Horner (1953-2015)

    Roger Bourland
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:00 am
    James Horner was a true gentleman, a smart businessman, an excellent teacher, a sensitive artist with a big heart, and a composer who loved the art of collaboration—despite not always getting his way.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

  • Another Day in America

    Alex Ross
    4 Jul 2015 | 7:38 am
    Previously: Ten Lines from Laurie Anderson.
  • Soundcloud of the Day: Cassandra Miller

    Alex Ross
    3 Jul 2015 | 8:39 am
    Be sure to read the composer's note. Via Steve Smith.
  • A Tatiana Catanzaro moment

    Alex Ross
    2 Jul 2015 | 11:20 pm
    The composer's website can be found here.
  • Dog Days

    Alex Ross
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:42 am
    photos by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging. photos by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging photos by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging photos by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging photos by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging photos by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging Photo by Greg Grudt / Matthew Imaging. One day after the end of the Ojai Festival, I saw David T. Little's Dog Days at LA Opera — or, more precisely, at the REDCAT space under Disney Hall, in a Beth Morrison Projects production presented by LA Opera. Although I'd seen the work on video, I was still unprepared for the visceral, clobbering impact of…
  • Ojai Festival 2015

    Alex Ross
    28 Jun 2015 | 9:12 pm
    John Luther Adams listens to his Sila at Ojai. Outsiders. The New Yorker, July 6, 2015. More: Streams of most Ojai concerts are archived here. Two obvious highlights: Steve Schick's solo turn (Friday 8pm); and Gloria Cheng and Vicki Ray's authoritative Visions de l'Amen, paired with a blend of Boulez and Ravel's Mallarmé settings, in a remarkable performance by Mellissa Hughes (Sat. 11am). But four of the most striking events—Sila, ICE in the park, Anna Thorvaldsdottir's In the Light of Air, and For Philip Guston—were not recorded.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sequenza21/

  • A Small Encounter with Gunther Schuller

    Michael McDonagh
    27 Jun 2015 | 9:43 am
    It used to be that you could pick up the phone and call someone, and they would answer. And so it was perhaps a decade ago that I called Gunther Schuller’s Manhattan publicist John Gingrich innumerable times to see if Schuller was available for a date with the San Francisco branch of The Duke Ellington Society, which I headed at that time. John was forever patient–he told me he’d noted all the times I’d called– as he went over Gunther’s schedule to see when he’d be free, and after many calls we arrived at a date when Gunther could talk to our little…
  • Terry Riley is 80

    Christian Carey
    24 Jun 2015 | 1:59 pm
    Happy birthday to composer Terry Riley, who turns 80 today. There are CD releases out this week to celebrate the composer. My assessment of ZOFO Plays Terry Riley appears in the CD Reviews section of Sequenza 21 and on my blog. But wait, there’s more. Nonesuch Records has done right by Riley. They have released One Earth, One People, One Love, a 5-CD boxed set of the complete recordings of Riley’s music composed for Kronos Quartet. The set contains a disc of unreleased tracks, Sunrise of the Planetary Dream Collector: Music of Terry Riley. For those of you yelling –…
  • RIP Gunther Schuller (1925-2015)

    Christian Carey
    24 Jun 2015 | 7:51 am
    Saddening news. Gunther Schuller has died at the age of 89. A musical polymath, Schuller was active as a composer, conductor, arranger, historian, educator, arts administrator and, earlier in his career, French horn player. He pioneered the concept of “Third Stream” music: works that combine influences and materials from jazz and classical music. In Schuller’s honor, today I’m listening to a Boston Modern Orchestra Project recording of his pieces for jazz quartet and orchestra. Given all of the attempts over the years to synthesize jazz and classical, it is amazing how…
  • ICE at Ojai Music Festival

    Paul Muller
    18 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
    The International Contemporary Ensemble – ICE – was one of the featured groups performing at the 69th Ojai Music Festival. On Friday, June 12, 2013 ICE presented a varied concert of virtuosic pieces at the gazebo in the center of Libbey Park. A good-sized crowd turned out to hear the ICE artists play traditional acoustic instruments artfully combined with amplification and electronics.     Dan Lippel was first with Electric Counterpoint, a piece for guitar and tape by Steve Reich. The music was immediately recognizable as classic Reich and bubbled along with a satisfying groove.
  • Ojai Music Festival – Sila: The Breath of the World by John Luther Adams

    Paul Muller
    12 Jun 2015 | 7:49 pm
    The 69th annual Ojai Music Festival featured the West Coast premiere of Sila: The Breath of the World by John Luther Adams, staged outdoors in Libby Park as a free community event. Performers from ICE, red fish blue fish and Cal Arts – some 80 musicians in all – were placed in selected positions in the center of the park and the audience was invited to move around and among them as the piece progressed. Sila is an Inuit concept for the spirit that animates the world and marks the second outdoor piece by John Luther Adams at Libby Park. Inuksuit was performed here in 2012 under…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical Performance Podcast

  • Beethoven, with the Shanghai String Quartet

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    22 Jun 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The Shanghai Quartet play Beethoven on opening weekend of the 2015 Rockport Chamber Music Festival Ludwig van Beethoven: String Quartet No. 6 in B-flat, Op. 18 No. 6 Shanghai String Quartet Recorded at the Shalin Liu Performance Center, Rockport Massachusetts on June 6, 2015. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
  • Bach, with Sergey Schepkin

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    26 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Bach, with Sergey Schepkin Johann Sebastian Bach: Capriccio on the Departure of His Most Beloved Brother, BWV. 992 Sergey Schepkin, piano Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, March 7, 2013. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts Photo credit: Kathy Chapman
  • Ravel, with the Chameleon Arts Ensemble

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    11 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Ravel, with the Chameleon Arts Ensemble Maurice Ravel: Introduction and Allegro Members of the Chameleon Arts Ensemble: Anna Reinersman, harp; Deborah Boldin, flute; Kelli O'Connor, clarinet; Joanna Kurkowicz, violin; Heidi Braun-Hill, violin; Scott Woolweaver, viola; Rafael Popper-Keizer, cello Recorded in WGBH's Studio One, May 16, 2003. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts Photo credit: Susan Wilson
  • Beethoven, with Anton Nel

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    5 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Pianist Anton Nel plays Beethoven and Mendelssohn Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 6 in F, Op. 10 No. 2 Mendelssohn: Fantasy in F-sharp minor, Op. 28 Anton Nel, piano Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, December 4, 2008. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
  • Sarah Chang plays Franck and Elgar

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Violinist Sarah Chang is joined by pianist Andrew von Oeyen for music by Franck and Elgar Cesar Franck: Sonata in A major, Mvt. 4 (Allegretto poco mosso) Edward Elgar: Salut d’Amour Sarah Chang, violin; Andrew von Oeyen, piano Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, October 14, 2011. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    PlaybillArts.com

  • Meredith Monk In Her Own Voice

    30 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    It has a lot to do with listening to the other layers and to the series of musical events. It takes a different kind of listening. It's a very hands-on kind of music.
  • On Her Own Terms: Wendy Whelan Comes to City Center

    26 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    It's here that she began to recover her strength and learn her limits, and build the confidence to know that she needn't be defined by them. With the backing of the associateship, she can feel free to experiment. "I'm incredibly confident".
  • Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock Together Again

    22 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock have run on relatively parallel courses since both appeared on the scene in the early 1960s. Both musicians built their reputations on their fervent experimentalism and rejection of convention.
  • MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet: 50 Years Later, And Still For The First Time

    20 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    Though no English writer would dare try to improve upon William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, certain adaptations, especially in other art forms, can take on such a life of their own that they become—like the play itself—so consummate, it seems hard to imagine the world without them. Perhaps this was never truer than in the case of Kenneth MacMillan's 1965 balletic masterpiece of the same title, which is currently celebrating 50 splendid years.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    JDCMB

  • Honeymoon music-making, and a story about Brahms

    4 Jul 2015 | 2:18 am
    Rattle (left), Zimerman (centre) and the LSO: a night to remember. Photo: Amy T. ZielinksiThe honeymoon is underway over at the Barbican: Sir Simon Rattle is here for his first concerts with the LSO since The Announcement a few months back. On Thursday night he kicked off this stint with his orchestra-to-be, offering a high-octane programme of Brahms and Dvorak.The LSO, let's face it, needs him. We need him, too. He offers a taste of the genuine passion that should be at the heart of musical experience, yet all too often isn't as others let its precedence falter under the competing weight,…
  • Edward Gardner bows out

    3 Jul 2015 | 3:07 am
    Photos both by Richard Hubert SmithYesterday Edward Gardner took his final bow as music director of English National Opera after the last night of The Queen of Spades.The new incumbent, Mark Wigglesworth, steps up in the new season. We love Mark too, but we are going to miss Ed like the blazes. I have no doubt that the brightest of brilliant futures awaits this thrilling, charismatic and galvanisingly energetic musician. The good news is he's coming back to do Tristan & Isolde next year.ENO sent out a range of pictures from the event. Below, John Berry, flanked by the orchestra, bids…
  • Watch the Tchaikovsky Competition Prizewinners' Gala NOW

    2 Jul 2015 | 11:40 pm
    The Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow and St Petersburg has concluded with a storm of controversy in some departments. OK, let's face it, that is perhaps par for the course in contests of this magnitude. Today is your chance to see and hear the winners. It's on NOW at Medici.tvThe Prizewinners' Gala is taking place today at 5pm GMT in the Mariinsky II concert hall, St Petersburg - and you can watch it live. Valery Gergiev will also be announcing the winner of the Grand Prize - the one overall winner from the five categories of piano, violin, cello and voices male and female.Piano: Dmitry…
  • The other Prokofiev

    29 Jun 2015 | 10:54 pm
    I had a lovely interview a few weeks ago with Gabriel Prokofiev: composer, grandson of Sergei, founder of Nonclassical and composer of a Concerto for Turntables and Orchestra which is now on the new secondary school Ten Pieces list compiled as a music resource for schools by the BBC. It was in the Independent while I was away in Turkey. Here is a longer version with a good few chunks of bonus material.Gabriel Prokofiev is pondering, over a Turkish lunch in Bethnal Green, a surprise development in his career as composer. The BBC has picked a movement from one of his most famous compositions to…
  • Congratulations, Tchaikovsky Competition. You have an all-male piano final.

    28 Jun 2015 | 5:31 am
    We are not amused. Can it REALLY be the case that no women, not even Maria Mazo, were considered good enough to have a try for the final? Or is it same-old same-old yet again?The piano jury is all male too.The cello jury includes one woman. The cello final also includes one woman.The violin jury includes three women. The violin final also includes three women.Make of this what you will, because it all seems so wonderfully coincidental that I am stumped.You can watch the final live, and catch up on earlier rounds, on Medici.tv, here.Good luck to them all and may the best, er, man win.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Features - Classical MPR

  • Moveable Feast: Fourth of July

    2 Jul 2015 | 10:01 pm
    With the Fourth of July coming up, it's a perfect time for lakeside dining! On Moveable Feast, John Birge and Rachel Hutton of Minnesota Monthly check out some spots for good food and optimal fireworks viewing.
  • A Summer Copland Treat

    2 Jul 2015 | 12:20 pm
    Members of the faculty of the North Dakota State University (NDSU) School of Music, pianist Tyler Wottrich and flutist Catherine Gregory, perform 'Flowing' from the Copland Sonata for Flute and Piano from a performance recorded at NDSU in Fargo, N.D., earlier this year.
  • Fourth of July 2015: Where to find fireworks in the Twin Cities

    2 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    A guide to fireworks in the Twin Cities, with an interactive map.
  • Chris Huelsbeck's career leaps to next stage

    2 Jul 2015 | 8:50 am
    The enduring success of composer Chris Huelsbeck's early works has created a fan following in his native Germany and across the world. His work inspired a 2008 concert series, and more recently, he's crowd-funded a new album of piano works. Learn more about Chris Huelsbeck on this week's Top Score
  • Harmony in the Park: Recap in Photos

    1 Jul 2015 | 10:40 am
    Classical Minnesota Public Radio returned to Minnehaha Falls in Minneapolis and Leif Erikson Park in Duluth for Harmony in the Park in June. Relive the events through photos by MPR's Steve Cohen.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ionarts

  • Dip Your Ears, No. 198 (Mahler Transcribed)

    jfl
    4 Jul 2015 | 7:30 am
    G.Mahler/B.Walter, Sys. 1 & 2 arranged for piano four hands, Trenkner & Speidel Piano Duo MD|G Mahler Doubling Down on Ivory What do you give the Mahlerian who already has everything and of each Symphony five or twenty recordings? Why, piano transcriptions of those symphonies—in this case of Symphonies One and Two, arranged by Mahler-student Bruno Walter. The liner notes are onto
  • Dismally Banal 'Tell' at Covent Garden

    Charles T. Downey
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:35 am
    Sometimes it is good to know that you can still hit a nerve. Italian director Damiano Michieletto certainly did with his new production of Rossini's Guillaume Tell, which opened earlier this week at the Royal Opera in London. As reported by Rupert Christiansen for The Telegraph, the booing started long before the curtain call: Unprecedentedly at Covent Garden, the abusive heckling threatened to
  • Beethoven Sonatas - A Survey of Complete Cycles The Great Incomplete Cycles

    jfl
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:10 am
    Incl: Arrau “0” • Hungerford • Gieseking “Saarbrücken”• Gieseking “0” • Gilels • Gould • Kempff “0” • Richter “Philips” • Richter “Prague” • Richter-Haaser • Serkin “CBS” • Solomon Having listed all the complete* recordings of the Beethoven Sonatas, it is high time to list the “great near-complete”** such cycles. One might argue that Wilhelm Backhaus II and Claudio Arrau II also belong in the
  • Tchaikovsky Competition in Final Round

    Charles T. Downey
    30 Jun 2015 | 6:16 am
    You may already have been following the 15th Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow and St. Petersburg, which concludes its third and final round today. Viewers worldwide have been able to stream the competition online, but if you want to catch up, you can also stream the competition on demand. The piano competition has come down to six finalists: the Russian-trained Lukas Geniušas (from Lithuania),
  • Luciana D'Intino Upstages Gheorghiu in Paris

    Charles T. Downey
    29 Jun 2015 | 7:54 am
    The "departing gift" of Nicolas Joel, who stepped down as director of the Opéra de Paris last summer, is a production of Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur, on the stage now. Like so much of Joel's work in Paris, as far as the critics were concerned, this was not exactly a novelty, in a production by David McVicar, created for soprano Angela Gheorghiu, which has already made the rounds in London,
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Rambler

  • Programme for Music We’d Like To Hear, 2015

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    18 Jun 2015 | 2:43 am
    Quickly reposting here, for those who may not have seen yet. As always, a fantastic programme. All three concerts look pretty unmissable. music we’d like to hear 2015 three concerts on three fridays curated by two composers this edition supported by the RVW Trust, the Hinrichsen Foundation and the Canada Council for the Arts I … Continue reading →
  • BBC SO’s 2015-16 season

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    17 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
    The BBC SO’s season brochure has just arrived at the door. I’ve griped about the apparent ongoing demise of the orchestra’s Total Immersion days at the Barbican – days devoted to the work of a single contemporary composer through (usually) two or three concerts, some talk, a film and one or two other items. But this … Continue reading →
  • Save our Sounds at the British Library

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    19 May 2015 | 10:48 pm
    Email received today from the British Library: On the 12th January, the British Library launched a new initiative titled Save our Sounds.  One of the key aims of this programme is to preserve as much as possible of the nation’s rare and unique sound recordings, not just those in the Library’s collections but also key … Continue reading →
  • #promsnewmusic 2015

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    24 Apr 2015 | 2:15 am
    It’s Proms announcement time again. See below for the definitive list of new music in this year’s festival, or follow  #promsnewmusic on Twitter. Some brief observations. Last year it was all about the birthdays of Sir Harrison Birtwistle and Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. This year it’s Pierre Boulez’s turn. I had a bit of moan last 12 months ago that … Continue reading →
  • Icelandic Composer Watch

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    21 Apr 2015 | 1:55 am
    I happen to have heard two very good pieces by Icelandic composers this week. First is INTERWOVEN, by Úlfur Hansson, which opened the Tectonics Festival in Rejkjavik last week. A recording has just appeared on Hansson’s website. Textural/spectral, but with an unpredictable emotional ripple running through it. Second is Daníel Bjarnason‘s Five Possibilities, which I heard played … Continue reading →
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Opera Today

  • Latest news

    gary@operatoday.com
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:13 am
     
  • Guillaume Tell, Covent Garden

    gary@operatoday.com
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:35 pm
    It is twenty-three years since Rossini’s opera of cultural oppression, inspiring heroism and tender pathos was last seen on the Covent Garden stage, but this eagerly awaited new production of Guillaume Tell by Italian director Damiano Micheletto will be remembered more for the audience outrage and vociferous mid-performance booing that it provoked — the most persistent and strident that I have heard in this house — than for its dramatic, visual or musical impact.
  • Sara Gartland Takes on Jenůfa

    gary@operatoday.com
    30 Jun 2015 | 10:21 am
    Sara Gartland is an emerging singer who brings an enormous talent and a delightful personality to the opera stage. Having sung lighter soprano roles such as Juliette in Gounod’s Romeo et Juliette and Violetta in Verdi’s La traviata, Gartland is now taking on the title role in Leoš Janáček’s dramatic opera Jenůfa.
  • Aida, Opera Holland Park

    gary@operatoday.com
    26 Jun 2015 | 10:45 am
    With its outrageous staging demands, you sometimes wonder why opera companies want to produce Verdi’s Aida. But the piece is about far more than pharaohs, pyramids and camels.
  • Welsh National Opera explores Madness for autumn season

    gary@operatoday.com
    26 Jun 2015 | 8:57 am
     
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Opera Today News Headlines

  • Latest news

    Gary
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:13 am
    Go to our Facebook page for the latest news.
  • Welsh National Opera explores Madness for autumn season

    Gary
    26 Jun 2015 | 8:57 am
    Madness descends upon Welsh National Opera for its autumn 2015 season, with three new productions that will explore human turmoil through some of the finest musical expressions of madness and the human condition. The season launches WNO’s 70th birthday year which will see the company stage seven new productions over the course of the year — including two world premières — and a classic revival. [More . . . . ]
  • New Releases from Opera Rara

    Gary
    5 Jun 2015 | 10:03 am
    This month, Opera Rara embark on back-to-back recording projects — Donizetti’s Le duc d’Albe and Gounod’s La Colombe — with their Artistic Director Sir Mark Elder conducting the Hallé. Following last year’s release of Donizetti’s Rita which marked the company’s 50th complete opera recording to date, this is Opera Rara’s second collaboration with the Hallé. La Colombe will be released in November while Le duc d’Albe will be available next spring. Click here for more information.
  • A Time-Out With Isabel Leonard: In 'L'Heure Espagnole' at San Francisco Symphony

    Gary
    2 Jun 2015 | 7:30 pm
    By Sean Martinfield [Huffington Post, 2 June 2015] Mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard appears with conductor Charles Dutoit and the San Francisco Symphony this week in Ravel's one-act comic opera, L'Heure espagnole. (The Spanish Hour). The program opens with Ravel's brief "morning song," Alborado del gracioso and concludes with Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain featuring pianist Javier Perianes. The opera (not quite an hour) also features tenors Jean Paul Fouchécourt and John Mark Ainsley, along with baritones Jean-Luc Ballestra and David Wilson-Johnson. Isabel sings the role of…
  • On Site Opera Presents 'Barber of Seville' at Fabbri Mansion on New York’s Upper East Side

    Gary
    1 Jun 2015 | 10:02 am
    By K. Young [Classicalite, 31 May 2015] This summer, On Site Opera (OSO) will present a new production that personifies the company's mission to produce operas in non-traditional locations ideally suited to the stories they tell. This June (9-13), OSO will stage a site-specific production of The Barber of Seville at the opulent Fabbri Mansion (House of the Redeemer) on New York City's Upper East Side. [More . . . . ]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    aworks :: "new" american classical music

  • aworks top ten :: today's listening #perchance #modularsynth

    rgable
    14 Jun 2015 | 10:00 pm
    William Tyler - Man of Oran. Deseret Canyon Jon Hopkins - Open Eye Signal. Immunity Colin Stetson and Sarah Neufeld - And Still They Move. Never Were the Way She Was The Modern Jazz Quartet - Bags' Groove. The Modern Jazz Quartet (Bonus Track Version) Judd Greenstein / Now Ensemble - City Boy. Dreamfall Gloria Coates / Susan Allen - Perchance to Dream. Postcard from Heaven. Not quite typical harp music. Steve Flato - I'll Never Be Able to Afford a Modular Synth. Poverty Electronics. The artist"is concerned with impurity, taking processes and concepts and freely interchanging them without the…
  • aworks top ten :: today's listening #possibility #difficulty #railroad

    rgable
    13 Jun 2015 | 9:38 pm
    Aidan Baker - Doors as Possible. Souvenirs of the Eternal Present EP David Lang - The Difficulty of Crossing a Field. A new and interesting recording from Cantaloupe Music.  Modern Jazz Quartet - Bag's Groove (Live). The Complete Modern Jazz Quartet Prestige & Pablo Recordings Steve Gunn - Dive for the Pearl. Melodies for a Savage Fix Steve Gunn - Topeka AM Melodies for a Savage Fix Atheus - Deploy. Occult Symphony (Unmixed) Steely Dan - Do It Again. Can't Buy a Thrill Charles Ives / Stephen Drury - The Celestial Railroad. Faith, The Loss of Faith, And The Return of Faith. The album…
  • aworks top five of the day :: ssingggg, cat people

    rgable
    27 Apr 2015 | 9:34 pm
    Ssingggg Sschlllingg Sshpppingg. Charlemagne Palestine Musica de Palladium. Dan Román Retrospectos. Dan Román Sometimes I Feel So Deserted. The Chemical Brothers Cat People (Putting Out Fire). David Bowie Palestine: I may have mistyped that name above but apparently this is a new recording, on the idiosyncratics label although Google only returns six results when searching. In any case, this is a noisy, creative 51 minute stream, if not river, of music and beyond. Román: A native of Puerto Rico, the composer writes lyrically and rhythmically. Innova calls it "post-minimalism with the…
  • aworks weekly top ten :: mostly cage, dylan & caribou

    rgable
    8 Mar 2015 | 5:11 pm
    The Unavailable Memory Of. John Cage/Philipp Vandré - Vol. 37: Complete Short Works For Prepared Piano  The Ensemble Chord In C With A Major 7th And A Guitar Base. Duane Pitre - Organized Pitches Occurring in Time  These Shadows. Wooden Shjips - Back to Land  Like a Rolling Stone. Bob Dylan - Highway 61 Revisited Souvenir. John Cage/Teodoro Anzellotti  - John Cage: Cheap Imitation, Souvenir & Dream  Highway 61 Revisted. Bob Dylan  - Highway 61 Revisited Desperate Man Blues. John Fahey - The Best of John Fahey 1959-1977 (Remastered)  Melody Day. Caribou - Andorra  Niobe. Caribou -…
  • aworks weekly top ten :: led, glass & bernstein

    rgable
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:40 pm
    Milly's Garden. Steve Gunn - Way Out Weather  Gathering of Ancient Tribes. Goat - Commune  Over the Hills and Far Away. Led Zeppelin - Houses of the Holy (Deluxe Edition)  Mad Rush. Philip Glass/Bojan Gorišek- Solo Piano Roll with the Changes. REO Speedwagon - The Hits  No Quarter. Led Zepellin - Houses of the Holy (Deluxe Edition)  Amo Bishop Roden. Boards of Canada - Warp20 (Chosen) Orphee's Bedroom. Philip Glass/Bojan Gorišek  - Solo Piano  The Last Time I Saw Your Face. Jefre Cantu-Ledesma - A Year With 13 Moons  Symphony No. 2. Charles Ives/Leonard Bernstein - Ives: Symphony…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sounds & Fury

  • Berliner Philharmoniker Elects Kirill Petrenko Chief Conductor

    A.C. Douglas
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:59 am
    The musicians of the Berliner Philharmoniker yesterday overwhelmingly elected Kirill Petrenko to be their new chief conductor on the resignation of Sir Simon Rattle in...
  • Great Fun!

    A.C. Douglas
    20 Jun 2015 | 8:24 am
    Point Ones, work for "sensor-augmented conductor [and] small ensemble" by Schubert (Alexander, that is, not Franz). (Our thanks to Alex Ross for the link.)
  • 16 June 1904

    A.C. Douglas
    16 Jun 2015 | 7:09 am
  • Trouble At Bayreuth — Again

    A.C. Douglas
    10 Jun 2015 | 8:55 am
    Those who really know what's behind what actually happened here have so far remained strangely silent about it publicly and the press can offer only...
  • An Especially Unsettling Earworm

    A.C. Douglas
    31 May 2015 | 11:57 pm
    Prompted by our rereading of Kafka's The Trial (we'd just added it to our Kindle after realizing it was missing from our Kindle library) we...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    grecchinois

  • Love Wins

    nick
    26 Jun 2015 | 7:37 pm
    Waking up to the news of the Supreme Court of the United States' ruling legalizing gay marriage this morning, was an incredible and overwhelming sensation.  All day, I've felt so joyous, jubilant, emotional, enfranchised and empowered as the news has sunken in as a reality.  Surrounded by rainbows everywhere in my recently adopted home of San Francisco, where Pride celebrations have now stepped into overdrive, I couldn't be in a more perfect place to celebrate this historic, beautiful day.A dear friend wrote to me today, expressing his admiration for last night's performance of…
  • Throwback Thursday: Oleg and Pierre

    nick
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:26 pm
    Oleg Bryjak, centerA quick throwback Thursday post on two fronts. Firstly, remembering the bass-baritone, Oleg Bryjak, who was among the 150 passengers on the Germanwings flight that crashed in the French Alps on Tuesday.  I had the chance to sing with Oleg back in 2010 during a production of Rossini's L'Italiana in Algieri at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein.  Oleg was a wonderful colleague - smart, funny, and an incredibly strong singer with an impressively agile and powerful voice, he was truly fearless on stage. All of the news about this Germanwings plane is more…
  • Old Lutes

    nick
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:35 am
    See how happy he is, playing his lute?The text of the second song in Britten's Songs from the Chinese, 'The Old Lute', which Eliot Fisk and I performed recently at the Menil Collection with Da Camera of Houston, has been nagging at the back of mind since our concert a few weeks ago. The Old LuteOf cord and cassia-wood is the lute compounded;Within it lie ancient melodies.Ancient melodies weak and savorless,Not appealing to present men's taste.Light and colour are faded from the jade-stops;Dust has covered the rose-red strings.Decay and ruin came to it long ago,But the sound that is…
  • Michigan-inspired Serenades

    nick
    23 Jan 2015 | 7:22 am
    Post-performance shot backstage with the amazing David CooperIn a way, if one thinks about it, much of Britten's music after 1939 is, in a way, inspired by my home state of Michigan.  One night, in a hotel room in Grand Rapids, the relationship between Britten and Pears escalated from a professional friendship to the intense romance that knit the two together for the rest of Britten's life.  A quote from one of Pears' later letters to Britten:"I shall never forget a certain night in Grand Rapids -- Ich liebe dich, io t'amo, jeg elske deg(?), je t'aime, in fact, my little…
  • Pink Elephants

    nick
    20 Jan 2015 | 8:50 pm
    A week from tonight, I'll be performing with guitarist, Eliot Fisk, with Da Camera of Houston. The program is comprised of music performed by Sir Peter Pears and the famed guitarist, Julian Bream - who accompanied Pears with increasing frequency towards the end of Britten's life, the period when Britten wasn't anymore able to accompany Pears in recital due to the deterioration of his right hand after undergoing heart surgery in 1973. Bream and PearsThe program opens with a song that I initially thought was just a simple silly song, but has over the past couple of months given me pause.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bass Blog

  • LOTR:TROTK

    8 Jun 2015 | 1:29 pm
    “Well, I'm back.” – Sam Gamgee   Sorry for the lengthy hiatus. For some of the time, I have a good excuse for not posting – I was away on sabbatical for a year – and for the rest of it, I have an even better one – general malaise, with a side of laziness. Thanks to those kindly who inquired as to the fate of the blog, and even in a few rare instances, my own well-being. The requests to have the blog start up again were all greatly appreciated and truly touching. Any fellow creeping along a high ledge, hearing the crowd below encouraging him to 'jump!' would be…
  • Return to Mordor

    14 Jul 2013 | 11:36 am
     A pattern seems to be evolving at Ravinia; begin the truncated summer session with a week of Christoph von Dohnányiand end with a week of Lord of the Rings. I'm not sure how many years the eighty-three-year-old maestro has left, but now that the LOTR folks have turned The Hobbit into a trilogy of films, we have five more to go. (If they tackle The Silmarillion, I'll probably throw myself under a train. If Ravinia ever makes us play LOTR, the musical, I might self immolate in the parking lot.)  Sometimes it feels as if Sauron himself takes a hand in scheduling during the summer…
  • Heart of Darkness

    24 Jun 2013 | 3:08 am
    The Rivers Festival came to an end on June 9th, although the onstage activities seemed to take a week off for a Haydn/Martinu/Scriabin program that had nothing to do with rivers, as far as I could tell. Music directors conduct what they want, when they want to, and the rest of the season kind of takes shape around that. However, among other things going on that week, there was some sort of outdoor concert which the MD took part in, and also a bunch of brass players went down the local river in a boat (He got a real pretty mouth ain't he? - insert your favorite quote from deliverance here. I…
  • Without a Paddle

    2 Jun 2013 | 12:26 am
    Rivers Festival, May 9 – June 9  After two weeks of the Rivers Festival, it is hard to determine if we are headed up or down stream. Whatever direction, the journey has had its interesting moments. In spite of the minor drought of audience members, the Festival deserves credit for at least attempting to find some connection to the world outside the concert hall. Heaven knows we need some of that. For those interested in more background information, a handsome website has been put together. Go to {redacted}so.org and look for the link to the Rivers Festival. Although talking…
  • Oh Doctor!

    2 May 2013 | 5:21 pm
    My vacation took me far away from the first couple weeks of the latest installment of music director mania. The third week had some underplayed gems on the program - Mendelssohn Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage, Beethoven Consecration of the House, Schumann Rhenish. (Mozart, Piano Concerto no. 21 with Pollini rounded out the show.)  Legitimately a masterpiece, the Schumann is also the least underplayed of the of the three. Nevertheless, I would gladly trade in a few extraneous repetitions of Bruckner 4, Beethoven 3, (and while in the key of E flat, throw in Ein Heldenleben) for a couple…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Collaborative Piano Blog

  • Simon Lepper Talks About the Accompanying Program at The Royal College of Music

    Chris Foley
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:20 am
    Over the last few months, I've been in correspondence with Simon Lepper, one of Britain's top accompanists. He was recently featured on a CPB article on what it takes to be an accompanist and why the British are so awesome at it, and reached out regarding a possible profile of the accompanying program at London's Royal College of Music, which he coordinates. Simon is a recipient of the Gerald Moore and Geoffrey Parsons Awards, and has an incredibly active musical career, including serving as official accompanist of the Cardiff Singer of the World Competition. If you would like to contact…
  • Photo of the Day: Telemann Fantasia in D minor

    Chris Foley
    2 Jul 2015 | 8:30 am
    Sometimes you need to explain things to students in the most visual way possible. This is from the middle section of the Telemann Fantasia in D minor:
  • Vote Now: What Are the Greatest Art Songs of All Time?

    Chris Foley
    1 Jul 2015 | 7:26 pm
    Art song, the distressed poorer cousin of opera, hiding within its forgotten leaves some of the most beautiful and fleeting moments of poetry for singers, pianists and audiences to partake of....La Scena Musicale is conducing a survey of people in the musical field to determine the 10 greatest art songs of all time. This is part of a larger initiative to promote both classical music and the art song genre(!) through its upcoming Next Great Art Song contest.The first part of the initiative is to compile a list of the 10 greatest art songs of all time, to be mentioned in upcoming print editions…
  • Simon Lepper Talks About What It Takes To Be An Accompanist And Why the British Are So Awesome At It

    Chris Foley
    28 Mar 2015 | 7:10 pm
    I'm very glad to have recently made the acquaintance of Simon Lepper, the Head of Piano Accompaniment at the Royal College of Music in London. In an interview from a recent Vrije Geluiden episode, Simon talks about the British tradition of accompanying and how collaboration works so well with the British psyche. What particularly resonated with me was the way Simon explained how poetry informs his approach to the keyboard.Kudos go to Vrije Geluiden for how they are able to bring to life the immediacy of classical music with such a contemporary and genuine context. If only this approach could…
  • Wendy Hatala Foley and I Will Be Performing This Saturday at the Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts

    Chris Foley
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:36 am
    When Wendy and I lived in Vancouver, we performed together all the time. Astonishingly, since we moved to the Toronto area in 2002, we have never yet shared the stage for a concert. Wendy quickly got work in the opera, symphony, and described video fields, while I've been mostly busy with the worlds of contemporary opera and piano pedagogy.Each year, the Oakville Symphony holds several outreach events to introduce younger audiences to the instruments and voices that they will hear throughout the symphony's season. On Saturday, March 28, Wendy and I will be performing two free concerts at the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    parterre box

  • Midwestern union

    Buck Aye
    3 Jul 2015 | 11:51 am
    This past Tuesday, Cincinnati Opera presented its first world premiere in over 50 years with Morning Star by Ricky Ian Gordon and William Hoffman. The opera was originally commissioned by Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Goodman Theater in the late 1990s, but the collaboration fell apart. When Gordon was contacted in 2012 by Opera Fusion: New Works, he chose to continue work on Morning Star with Hoffman. Three years later, here we are, with mixed results.   In a pre-performance talk, Gordon called Morning Star an “operacal” which I took to mean opéra comique. The source material is Sylvia…
  • Conquering New York

    WindyCityOperaman
    3 Jul 2015 | 11:34 am
    On this day in 1954 the musical Wonderful Town closed at Winter Garden Theater after 559 performances.   Born on this day in 1854 composer Leos Janacek http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeQK27m79yk Born on this day in 1878 composer and performer George M Cohan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIr-FoBW5Xw Born on this day in 1890 bass Josef von Manowarda http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCO1zcQJHQk Born on this day in 1903 opera administrator David Webster http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwNOIFUPbNw Born on this day in 1922 bass David Ward http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgrqS4e_1aA Born on this day…
  • Time is the reef upon which all our frail mystic ships are wrecked

    WindyCityOperaman
    2 Jul 2015 | 3:21 am
    On this day in 1941 Noël Coward‘s Blithe Spirit premiered in London.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwVMC5w0BNU Born on this day in 1714 composer Christoph Willibald von Gluck http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hpm-kAPNZgg Born on this day in 1900 theatre and opera director Tyrone Guthrie http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWvzxGFA4Cs Born on this day in 1922 conductor Bryan Balkwill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cGZpsnt5848 Born on this day in 1923 baritone György Melis http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuaK0zINEJQ Happy 71st birthday baritone Christian Johannes Du Plessis…
  • Pop! Six! Squish! Uh-uh!

    La Cieca
    1 Jul 2015 | 2:07 pm
    “In a sudden, stunning, and largely unexplained change in procedure, Lyric Opera of Chicago has opted not to release any details of its financial performance for FY2015 that ended yesterday.” [Chicago Business Journal]
  • Tu che di gelato sei cinta

    La Cieca
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    It’s the first of July, and naturally La Cieca won’t let the day go by without a salute to those wonderful advertisers who keep parterre.com online and thriving. This month, let’s hear a round of applause for The Lincoln Center Festival, Bard SummerScape, the Bayerische Staatsoper and the Martina Arroyo Foundation Prelude to Performance.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Kenneth Woods- conductor

  • Four for the Fourth

    Kenneth Woods
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:42 am
    I gave up a long time ago on trying to find much meaning or substance in music for patriotic occasions. We live an age of such small-minded, parochial jingoism that thinking of any music in terms of nationalist celebrations seems only to cheapen the music. This year I got thinking that maybe it’s gotten so bad that it’s time to fight back. Leaving music out of the discussion seems to only encourage the triumphalist nitwits. A day like the Fourth of July ought to be a moment for reflection as well as celebration. We ought to take at least a moment to think about the nation’s…
  • Malcolm MacDonald on Brahms opus 26

    Kenneth Woods
    25 Jun 2015 | 2:41 am
    Rehearsals have been going well for this weekend’s performance of my arrangement of the Brahms A major Piano Quartet for orchestra in Guildford. For some reason, the A major has always been the least played of the Brahms Piano Quartets. I’m sure it’s absolutely epic scale puts some groups off, but I know many of my chamber music colleagues seem to feel it’s a weaker piece than either the G minor or C minor, or, for that matter, the much more famous Piano Quintet. I’ve always loved the piece, and spending so much one-on-one time with it lately has really made me…
  • RIP Gunther Schuller

    Kenneth Woods
    23 Jun 2015 | 11:06 am
      I met Gunther at his wonderful festival at Sandpoint in the 1990’s. On the second night of the festival, I ran into him in the bar and in spite of our vast difference in age, achievement and knowledge, had one of the all-time great bar hangs of my life. Gunther’s public persona could be quite imperious, but one-on-one, one quickly realised that everything he did and said was motivated by an incredibly deep love of music. The man lived music- he only slept about 3-4 hours a day, and while everyone else was talking, resting, eating or chatting, he was always busy composing,…
  • On Orchestrating Brahms’s Opus 26

    Kenneth Woods
    20 Jun 2015 | 8:02 am
    The idea for this orchestration of the Brahms Piano Quartet in A Major, opus 26 came to me spontaneously in a real flash of inspiration while I was coaching chamber music at the Ischia Chamber Music Festival in the Bay of Naples in 2008. I vividly remember the bright blue sea and cloudless sky over  Mount Epomeo that morning as I listened to a  group play though the first movement of the piece in its original form. As I began to work with them on the piece, I found myself speaking to the pianist, as I often do, in orchestral terms. “Can you try playing the opening phrase like…. a…
  • Charleston: I am aware

    Kenneth Woods
    18 Jun 2015 | 11:45 am
    I was not aware of what had just happened, but sometimes, it’s better not to know. Today my colleagues (Matthew Sharp, David LePage, Suzanne Casey and Catherine Leech) and I played a noontime recital as part of the English Symphony Orchestra’s Magna Carta 800 celebrations at Worcester Cathedral . The entire festival has been a musical exploration of the on-going struggle for freedom, liberty and human dignity. Our program was called America’s March Toward Freedom, and focused particularly on America’s troubled history of slavery, race relations and the fight for equality. Blissfully…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Iron Tongue of Midnight

  • Once Again, I Beg of You.

    3 Jul 2015 | 8:46 am
    Dear Concert Presenters:PLEASE, oh pretty please with sugar on top, please provide your schedule on web page that works like paper, where at a glance an interested person can see the following for every one of your concerts:Date, day of weekLocationPerformersWorks on program (and who is playing what, if it there is an ambiguity)I'm looking at you, Music@Menlo, and you, Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Do you  make money from every click? I don't think so.Yours,Frustrated
  • London Friday Photo

    3 Jul 2015 | 8:46 am
    Gate at Shakespeare's GlobeLondon, May, 2014
  • Funding

    2 Jul 2015 | 2:11 pm
    We could see more performances of Les Troyens if opera companies would stop performing Faust, Romeo & Juliet, Manon, and Samon & Dalilah* and put the money aside for better operas. Seriously, just stop with that stuff.* Added for Joshua Kosman's benefit. I thought it was a hoot the one time I saw it....but once in a lifetime is enough for me.
  • Les Troyens: 2.5 and Counting

    29 Jun 2015 | 10:30 am
    Back in the fall - this seems a million years ago now - I swapped my Troyens subscription seats from a night assigned to Davida Karanas for Cassandre to one of the nights when Anna Caterina Antonacci was singing. I now wish I had not, what with Karanas leaving the production and Michaela Martens coming in, but I think I was sick or recovering from being sick that Saturday night, and anyway I did get to see Martens at the second performance.What I did not expect, and neither did anyone else, was that star tenor Bryan Hymel would sing the first two performances, then get sick and miss the…
  • If Only I Gave a Damn About Fidelio.

    29 Jun 2015 | 9:14 am
    To SFS last night, for the last of their semi-staged? concert? performances of Beethoven's only opera, Fidelio. I am afraid that it merely confirmed my past experience of the piece, that while it's got a lot of decent music, it's not a very good opera. There's a decent opera somewhere in the story (I said that about another opera recently....) but Beethoven and his librettist don't manage to find it.And that is because not only does not much happen in the opera, which has about five minutes of dramatic tension, but the first act is really a waste as far as advancing the plot goes. It is all…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Musical Assumptions

  • The Farmer's Evening Entertainment

    3 Jul 2015 | 9:23 am
    I came across this gem in the IMSLP, and thought I'd transcribe Solomon Howe's "Miscellaneous Observations" from 1804 and share them here.Miscellaneous Observations on MusicVOCAL Music is the easiest of all Arts, if the Performers have an accurate perceptions in distinguishing the semitones, and are favor’d with seasonable and careful instruction. Tho’ Music appears mysterious to a beginner, yet the difficulties soon vanish after trial. They, who wish to sing gracefully, should observe the following Directions, with care, viz.1. That none continue to sing, who cannot, on sufficient trial,…
  • Enough Never Is

    29 Jun 2015 | 8:34 am
    The poor have little,Beggars none;The rich too muchEnough not oneBenjamin Franklin (quoted above) was talking about money, but I think that we musicians suffer from a different kind of perpetual deficit. It would not be too much of a leap to assume that most musicians in the non-pop field are not in music mainly for the money. Music as a profession actually makes little economic sense since the amount of work musicians put in (practicing and learning music, building and maintaining technique, rehearsing, marketing) and the costs of the materials involved (the cost of buying and maintaining…
  • Marshall Fine's Music in Homage, Op. 69

    28 Jun 2015 | 12:02 pm
    Robert Patterson made a beautiful edition of my brother Marshall's Music in Homage (a piece that he wrote 1991 for violin, horn, and piano) and uploaded it into the IMSLP. Patterson, violinist Gregory Maytan, and pianist Maeve Brophy gave the first performance of the piece earlier in June, and there is now an excellent recording of it in the IMSLP.
  • A Very Nice Performance of My Pachelbel Canon Transcription

    27 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    I was really pleased to find this lovely performance of my Pachelbel Canon transcription by a string quartet in Japan (I think) on YouTube, so I'm sharing it here.[You can find the score and parts here.]
  • Inside Out: A Movie for Grown-ups

    26 Jun 2015 | 7:24 am
    Inside Out is about a "typical" girl who has a "typical" emotional response to moving from the place she spent all 11 of her childhood years to somewhere new. We learn about her from the "cocktail" of emotional functionaries inside of her brain. In the scene below we actually get to meet the emotional functionaries in her parents' brains as well.Here are Riley's "controllers" for (in order) Disgust, Anger, Joy, Sadness, and Fear:Here are Riley's father's "controllers" for (in order) Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear, and Disgust:Here are Riley's mother's "controllers: for (in order) Fear, Joy,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    eighth blackbird » Blog

  • eighth blackbird joins Matt Ulery and Active Child in Millennium Park’s “Downtown Sound” music series

    Michael
    18 Jun 2015 | 7:37 am
    The post eighth blackbird joins Matt Ulery and Active Child in Millennium Park’s “Downtown Sound” music series appeared first on eighth blackbird.
  • For immediate release – Celebrate Brooklyn

    Michael
    15 Jun 2015 | 6:02 am
    The post For immediate release – Celebrate Brooklyn appeared first on eighth blackbird.
  • Position Opportunity – Director of Development

    Michael
    19 May 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Full job description below. The post Position Opportunity – Director of Development appeared first on eighth blackbird.
  • a fond farewell to Curtis

    Yvonne
    11 May 2015 | 8:25 am
    In C Rehearsal with Steve Mackey Enjoying omelettes at Little Pete's Visiting schools with Artist Year fellow Alexandra Von der Embse   A couple of weeks ago, we visited Curtis for the last official week of our three-year residency. It was a busy and exciting week with Steve Mackey in residence, and we pulled together a wonderful program of his music that was live-streamed on Curtis’ website. His music is super fun but unbelievably challenging, so there wasn’t much time during the week to reflect on our past time at Curtis. The concert went well, the students pulled it together…
  • Countdown to Old Town

    Yvonne
    15 Apr 2015 | 3:32 pm
    There are officially nine (9) days until our debut at Old Town School of Music! We’re really excited to finally perform at one of Chicago’s most venerable cultural institutions, and we have a lineup of our greatest hits in store, including a four-hand piano work by our very own Lisa Kaplan. The other two hands for each of the three movements of her piece, whirligig, will be supplied by Nick, Matthew, and yours truly. Also on the program is a duo by Timo Andres, sextets by Nico Muhly, Bryce Dessner and Andy Akiho, as well as an arrangement of works we call Songs of Love and…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    an unamplified voice

  • Off topic: the sleeping prince's awakening

    JSU
    25 Jun 2015 | 1:34 pm
    It's been five years since I wrote more than a line here about this publication's official off-topic topic: ABT's Veronika Part.In that time, all too many of Part's lead performances have been dragged down by the use of New York native and recentish (2011) principal Cory Stearns as her primary ABT partner. As absent as she was present, as callow as she was wholly formed, Stearns -- whose actual steps and jumps, to be fair, have certainly gained focus -- left the balletic tragedienne little-or-nothing to work with. Most of her successes have been in her irregular pairings with Gomes, Bolle, et…
  • Hvorostovsky has a brain tumor

    JSU
    24 Jun 2015 | 8:55 pm
    This sounds very bad. Let's hope for the best.
  • A Verdi soprano

    JSU
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:50 pm
    I wanted to wait until I finished a full review of the several Don Carlo performances I've seen in the past weeks, but that may take a while to get to. So, a quick word on Wednesday night's house debut of Lianna Haroutounian.Simply put, she is a real Verdi soprano -- already the most exciting and appropriate in these middle-weight parts besides Sondra Radvanovsky (who has other mountains to climb next season). Haroutounian is not yet (and may never be) the tragedienne Barbara Frittoli is and was as Elisabetta, but from start to finish the scope and physical thrill of her voice was revelatory,…
  • The suitors

    JSU
    30 Mar 2015 | 2:00 pm
    I've been absent for a while, so let's go backwards.Ernani - Metropolitan Opera, 3/20/2015Meli, Meade, Domingo, Belosselskiy / LevineThe presence of superstar tenor turned embarrassingly amateur conductor turned hit-and-miss baritone Placido Domingo is no longer the most notable thing about a production. But perhaps he catalyzed what struck me so strongly on this night: the palpable attention, long familiar here but absent from shows I've seen this season, of the Met audience that recognized itself as such. The sounds and silences (and you can sense it best in the quiet) of a crowd sure in…
  • Met Council Finals 2015

    JSU
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:10 am
    The program is above. Singers discussed below in order.Deniz Uzun (mezzo, 26)This German (by way of Indiana University) singer, like most of this year's lineup, showed a quite promisingly expressive timbre, solid from top to bottom (where she directed a number of her elaborations) with threads of quick vibrato. The performance, though, was a bit herky-jerky, both in body -- it seemed that most of the singers had decided to flap their limbs around on stage -- and, more worrisomely, in phrase. The Rossini just seemed uncoordinated, phrases going hither and thither, but the Carmen aria suggested…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    On An Overgrown Path

  • You can't write that because it will deter sponsors

    4 Jul 2015 | 3:51 am
    My intention to leave the hot potato of the ethics of funding alone has been blown out of the water by the letter in the Guardian from composers and academics opposing BP's sponsorship of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. What role ethics should play in classical music sponsorship has been a recurring and often unpopular theme On An Overgrown Path over the years. A series of posts here in 2011 explored classical music's ethically compromised sponsors and in 2012 two posts shifted the spotlight onto BP. One of these highlighted the sponsorship by BP of Jonathan Harvey's Weltethos - the…
  • Late night thoughts on listening to Woody Guthrie

    3 Jul 2015 | 2:10 am
    Researching yesterday's post about activist musicians putting their money where their mouth is - or rather not putting it where their mouth is in the case of some celebrities - led me to an article in Dissent magazine by Evgeny Morozov, a former Google fellow at Georgetown University. Here is a short extract from his thoughtful analysis of the social media revolution:... Harmless activism wasn’t very productive either: what do 100 million people invited to join the Facebook group “100 Million Facebook members for Democracy in Iran ” expect to get out of their membership? Is it just a…
  • First comes morality, then comes the belly

    2 Jul 2015 | 12:40 am
    Ibn 'Arabi told how "I follow the religion of love wherever the camels turn". Recently my similar but far more modest search took me to the city of Guelmim in southern Morocco. Guelmim, which holds a weekly camel market, is known as the 'gateway to the desert', and is the capital of the Guelmim-Es Semara region which includes southern Morocco and the disputed northern Western Sahara. South of Guelmim is the territory of the Sahrawi people; the city is the base for many brave activists supporting the oppressed Sahrawi's, and I wrote about the Sahrawi musician and activist Aziza Brahim in 2012.
  • Music as a bridge between form and the formless

    28 Jun 2015 | 10:45 am
    It was only when I stood on the Aswan High Dam and looked south across Lake Nasser that I really understood the tragedy of the Nubian people. Beneath more than 2000 square miles of water lie the Nubian homelands that were flooded when the dam was built in the 1960s, and between the dam and Aswan are the soulless villages that the Nubians were resettled in. Hamza El Din (1929-2006) - seen above - made it his mission to preserve the Nubian culture that was being extinguished by the waters of Lake Nasser. He was born in the Nubian village of Toshka which was flooded when the High Dam was built.
  • Conflict cannot exist without agreement

    28 Jun 2015 | 2:41 am
    When nations fight they must first agree on something to fight about. Conflict cannot exist without agreement, an agreement more fundamental than the conflict. To fight there must be cooperation.Those words come from Jonathan Harvey in his 1999 book In Quest of Spirit; such penetrating insight supports the view I expressed at the time of his death that Jonathan had a Bodhisattva mind. Header graphic is Tunisian oud virtuoso Anouar Brahem's ECM CD Le Voyage de Sahar. Also on Facebook and Twitter. Any copyrighted material is included as "fair use", for the purpose of critical analysis only, and…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    rogerbourland.com

  • La Paloma y el Ruiseñor (2014) — Mazatlán premiere

    Roger Bourland
    23 Jun 2015 | 2:05 pm
    La Paloma y el Ruiseñor (Spanish subtitles) La Paloma y el Ruiseñor (English subtitles) Premiere performance of LA PALOMA Y EL RUISENOR (2014) Music by Roger Bourland, Libretto by Mitchell Morris, Spanish adaptation by Placido Domingo Jr, and additional orchestrations and adjustment to the Spanish setting by Scott Dunn. Composer: Roger Bourland Libretto: Mitchell Morris Spanish adaptation: Placido Domingo Jr. Conductor: Scott Dunn November 14, 15 2014: 8:00 CULTURA/MAZATLÁN Producer: Raúl Rico González Production assistant: Abril Márquez Orchestra: Camarata Mazatlán; Percival Álvarez,…
  • Press conferences

    Roger Bourland
    23 May 2015 | 10:28 am
    Raúl Rico coordinated several press conferences for the opera. I was delighted to learn later that the premiere was widely publicized throughout Mexico. Scott Dunn and I had one interview with Raúl Rico as our faithful translator. (This has inspired me to become fluent in Spanish so that I don’t ever have to rely on translators, and besides, it’s a beautiful and great language.) The second interview involved town scholar, Enrique Vega, a professor and the go-to man with any questions regarding Mazatlán history, including Ángela Peralta. Raúl set up this little panel…
  • Meta meta

    Roger Bourland
    5 Feb 2015 | 1:20 pm
    My spouse kept telling people that my opera was a “meta opera” and by that, he meant: • this is an opera about an opera singer (Angela Peralta) • an opera that takes place in Mazatlán and that will be premiered in Mazatlán And there was another one. Act 1 involves a ship ride from La Paz to Mazatlán over the Sea of Cortez. Squalls, called “chubascos” can come up at any time and just as quickly go away. Just after this picture was taken (above) it started raining. It was Hurricane Vance going over. The streets outside our rehearsal turned into rivers. The room we…
  • Arriving early to listen to voices

    Roger Bourland
    13 Dec 2014 | 10:22 am
    [The next group of posts were written after the premiere of the opera.] Opera director and friend Peter Kazaras insisted that I meet with the singers as early as possible. As our performance was a combination of students and faculty it is especially important to have that early meeting. Peter explained that singers internalize their music, becoming a kind of muscle memory. It’s easy to make note changes for instrumentalists: “Clarinet, that is a B flat in measure 47″ and they change the note. Singers have to change a lot more making that change, it has to become part of…
  • Scott Dunn: The art of collaboration

    Roger Bourland
    7 Nov 2014 | 2:35 pm
    I have been blessed in my recent collaboration with pianist, conductor Scott Dunn who will be conducting the world premiere of my opera, La Paloma y el Ruiseñor at the Teatro Angela Peralta in Mazatlán, Mexico on November 14 and 15, 2014. Having scored several feature films, I have learned the value of “cutting”——this happens on all levels of the film industry, but in music it means that just because a composer provides good music for a scene, if, in the mind of the director, the music is not helping or doesn’t capture the mood, he asks that the music be rewritten. All…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Naxos New Releases

  • SIBELIUS, J.: Belshazzar's Feast / Overture in E Major / Scène de ballet / Cortège / Menuetto (Pajala, Turku Philharmonic, Segerstam) (8.573300)

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Alongside the great symphonies and tone poems, music for the theatre played an important rôle in Sibelius’s development. From exquisite nocturnal tranquility to the macabre ‘Dance of Life’, Belshazzar’s Feast is an exotic tale of seduction and tragedy to which Sibelius responded with some of his most hauntingly beautiful writing for the stage. The early Menuetto and lively Cortège were considered good enough by the composer to be recycled for further stage productions, while the Overture in E and Scène de Ballet started life as Sibelius’s…
  • BALADA, L.: Concerto for Piano, Winds and Percussion / Cello Concerto / Viola Concerto (Graf, Premo, Pillai, Carnegie Mellon Wind Ensemble) (8.573064)

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Long admired as a pioneer of the blending of ethnic music with avant-garde techniques, Leonardo Balada first encountered experimental electronic music in New York in the early 1960s. It was to have a significant bearing on his compositional development. In Cumbres (Heights), a ‘Short Symphony for Band’, he employs an ‘electronic’ effect with dramatic results. He pursues the idea of cluster-like textures in the Concerto for Piano, Winds and Percussion while also paying homage to Chopin, Poulenc and Stravinsky. Conflict and lyricism mark out the Viola Concerto, while the…
  • MILÁN, L.: El maestro, Libro 1 (Escobar) (8.573305)

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Although biographical details of his life remain sketchy, Luys Milán’s Libro de música de vihuela de mano intitulado El Maestro is certainly the oldest surviving printed collection of vihuela music. Tuned like the contemporary Renaissance lute, the Spanish vihuela is a guitar-shaped instrument and for it Milán wrote a series of compelling works including fantasias and pavans that maturely fused improvisatory and polyphonic elements. This recording presents all the solo vihuela pieces from the first book of El Maestro in the order in which they appear.
  • BECK, F.I.: Symphonies, Op. 2 (Thirteen Strings Chamber Orchestra, Mallon) (8.573323)

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Franz Ignaz Beck is increasingly acknowledged as one of the most forward-looking and inventive of mid-eighteenth-century symphonists. A student of the celebrated Johann Stamitz, Beck was trained in Mannheim, a focal point of new approaches to orchestral writing. Although small in scale, his Op. 2 set includes some of the most striking and harmonically daring works of their kind from the period. Further Beck Symphonies may be heard on Naxos 8.553790, 8.554071, 8.570799, 8.573248 and 8.573249.
  • LISZT, F.: Transcriptions from Operas by Meyerbeer (Liszt Complete Piano Music, Vol. 40) (Gallo) (8.573235)

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Naxos Blog

  • Podcast: The latest from the Canadian Classics series

    Naxos-FC
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    Canada’s Gryphon Trio was established in 1993 and its founding members remain the same to this day. Indefatigable as performers, teachers and administrators at institutions around Canada, the trio has commissioned over 75 new works since its inception. Raymond Bisha explores their latest recording of works by four distinguished Canadian composers: Brian Current, Andrew Staniland, Michael Oesterle and James K. Wright. Album details… Catalogue No.: 8.573533
  • Women Behaving Badly

    Naxos-FC
    26 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    I was eleven years old when I paid my first visit to a Madame Tussaud’s waxworks. Lookalike film stars and world leaders held some interest for a youngster, but the much anticipated highlight was a visit to the Chamber of Horrors. The display of instruments of torture had the desired effect on the visitor as much as the waxy victims, but the tableau that stuck in the mind (and remains there to this day) was that of an execution. No blood and gore. Just a gallows with the noose ready to do its service to society. The most arresting aspect was that the condemned person was a woman: Ruth…
  • Podcast: Toward a Season of Peace

    Naxos-FC
    19 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    Contemporary American composer Richard Danielpour calls them ‘siblings’: two discrete yet connected works that ponder the current endless cycle of brutalization and despair in the Middle East. Raymond Bisha introduces ‘Darkness in the Ancient Valley’ and ‘Toward a Season of Peace’, perfectly channeled subject areas for a composer who describes himself as “a 21st-century American composer with a Middle Eastern memory”. Album details… Catalogue No.: 8.578311-12
  • Sounds disastrous

    Naxos-FC
    12 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    The ease of global communication nowadays brings home the frequency of natural disasters and their tragic consequences. The only positive offshoot of such terrible occurrences seems to lie in the artistic reflections that composers have made in trying to capture these events, born of the less comforting side of Mother Nature. Picking through the catalogue throws up a number of works on this theme that may not be widely known, but are worth exploring over a few paragraphs here. The flood to end all floods was indeed on a biblical scale and in a biblical setting, and Mario…
  • Podcast: Hindemith’s String Quartets Nos. 1 and 4

    Naxos-FC
    5 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    Violinist, violist, pianist, conductor, composer, teacher, concert presenter and author—the impact of Paul Hindemith (1895-1963) on twentieth-century music is vast. Critic Paul Bekker said of him: “He doesn’t just compose—he musics!” Hindemith composed seven string quartets between World Wars I and II, and they have all been recorded and released on a highly-acclaimed cycle with the Amar Quartet on the Naxos label. In this podcast, Rick Phillips explores the third and final volume of the series. Album Details… Catalogue No.: 8.572165
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Berkshire Review for the Arts » Music

  • Jeannette Sorrell, Music Director of Apollo’s Fire: The Cleveland Baroque Orchestra, talks to Michael Miller

    Michael Miller
    1 Jul 2015 | 10:56 pm
    Just yesterday I had the pleasure of talking with Jeannette Sorrell, Music Director of Apollo’s Fire, the highly acclaimed period orchestra based in Cleveland, where she founded it twenty-three years ago. Today, rather like the venerable Cleveland Orchestra, Apollo’s Fire tours extensively in North America and Europe, bringing Ms. Sorrell’s warm, expressive vision of Baroque playing to both seasoned and neophyte audiences. Tomorrow, July 2, she will lead them at Tanglewood in a program called “Bach’s Coffee House,” referring to the Café Zimmermann in Leipzig, where first Georg…
  • A weekend of Monteverdi will conclude the Boston Early Music Festival and launch Aston Magna in Great Barrington

    The Editor
    18 Jun 2015 | 9:41 pm
    This spring has been teeming with a dizzying profusion of riches for the lover of early music in the Northeast. In April Carnegie Hall launched “Before Bach,” a month-long festival of Renaissance and Baroque music performed by the the most admired international groups and soloists in the field. Since this was an “on” year for The Boston Early Music Festival, an equally distinguished group of regulars and visitors just now packed about the same amount of musical activity into a week, supplemented by hosts of mostly outstanding comprimarii in its Fringe. This coming weekend BEMF’s…
  • Excitement at the Boston Symphony—Lots of It! But Questions Remain

    Larry Wallach
    19 May 2015 | 6:51 am
    The perfect word to describe Andris Nelsons’ conducting is “exciting.” He elicits spectacular playing from the Boston Symphony and knows how to mold the sound of the orchestra to his taste. The strings now sound rich, deep, and solid rather than airy, transparent and elegant, as was their traditional, French–flavored style. This works well in a German-Russian program; I am curious to hear what they (Nelsons and the orchestra) will do with canonical French material such as the orchestral works of​ Ravel. The post Excitement at the Boston Symphony—Lots of It! But Questions Remain…
  • The Winter of Our Discontent: Classical Music in Boston 

    Lloyd Schwartz
    6 May 2015 | 8:33 am
    As everyone in New England knows, this winter was one long slog. But significant musical events actually got to take place, and some of these have been exceptional. But many have been frustrating and disappointing. The post The Winter of Our Discontent: Classical Music in Boston  appeared first on The Berkshire Review for the Arts.
  • Wagner, Tannhäuser Overture. Sibelius, Symphony No. 2 – the BSO’s first recording under Andris Nelsons

    Steven Kruger
    25 Jan 2015 | 9:17 am
    I don’t think I have heard the Boston Symphony sound this full and deep since Koussevitzky. This CD inaugurates Andris Nelsons’ era at the helm of the BSO and signals a reinforcement of the orchestra’s considerable strengths in the more brooding side of the continental repertory. The post Wagner, Tannhäuser Overture. Sibelius, Symphony No. 2 – the BSO’s first recording under Andris Nelsons appeared first on The Berkshire Review for the Arts.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical CD Reviews

  • Firsova A Triple Portrait Marsyas Trio

    Gavin Dixon
    18 Jun 2015 | 3:40 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]-->Elena Firsova: Hommage to Canisy. Lost Vision. A Triple Portrait. Night Songs. Spring Sonata. For Slava. Meditation in the Japanese Garden. Three Poems of Osip
  • Alfred Schnittke Film Music Edition Strobel

    Gavin Dixon
    8 May 2015 | 2:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • MAHLER Symphony No. 4 Manning RCS Chamber Ensemble

    Gavin Dixon
    27 Apr 2015 | 9:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Raffi Besalyan: The Return

    Gavin Dixon
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Bruckner 3 Skrowaczewski London Philharmonic

    Gavin Dixon
    8 Apr 2015 | 3:20 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical CD Reviews

  • Firsova A Triple Portrait Marsyas Trio

    18 Jun 2015 | 3:40 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]-->Elena Firsova: Hommage to Canisy. Lost Vision. A Triple Portrait. Night Songs. Spring Sonata. For Slava. Meditation in the Japanese Garden. Three Poems of Osip
  • Alfred Schnittke Film Music Edition Strobel

    8 May 2015 | 2:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • MAHLER Symphony No. 4 Manning RCS Chamber Ensemble

    27 Apr 2015 | 9:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Raffi Besalyan: The Return

    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Bruckner 3 Skrowaczewski London Philharmonic

    8 Apr 2015 | 3:20 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Artiden

  • Please Don’t Start

    Grace Miles
    11 Jun 2015 | 10:02 am
    Please don’t tell me I’m strong. I can’t believe it when dishes are cluttering up the sink, clothes are strewn around my room, 30 urgent emails go unanswered, and I’m not talking to one of my best friends. I can’t help dwelling on that one negative comment even when there are a hundred positive ones […]
  • 6 Summer Jazz Piano Songs

    Grace Miles
    3 May 2015 | 10:02 am
    “Why are you wearing sandals?” “I’m dressing for what I want the weather to be,” I say. “Not what it is.” Megs and I inch our umbrellas closer to cross the street. I’ve collected some lazy summer songs, inspired by a cabaret-style performance I recently attended. These are great for jamming with a friend (or sister, in my case) as […]
  • 9 Grand & Flowing Piano Pieces: Popular Favourites

    Grace Miles
    26 Apr 2015 | 12:34 pm
    Grand, flowing, and fast. There is something to be said about an intricate melody, where a person can bang on the piano. When I shared my favourite piano solos, readers shared their beautiful favourites– here are some of the most popular piano solos from the community. Would you play any of these?   Polanaise in F Sharp Minor – […]
  • Finding Your Next Passion Project

    Grace Miles
    3 Apr 2015 | 10:09 pm
    These days, I only think about attending church when in need of kindness. Like, if I feel that I’ve let people down; but today, I’d rather hunt for Easter eggs. Which brings us to passion projects. A passion project gives you a glimpse into how a person manifest interests, takes control in an area they believe in. (Only new […]
  • How I Beat Stage Fright

    Grace Miles
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:00 am
    While most people can play piano in their room, the magic of the stage can be too much to handle. Ten minutes before my design event, my hands were shaking at the thought of people having woken up on a Saturday morning because of me. I’d printed cue cards (which I have never done, and will likely never do […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Grand Piano Passion™

  • How to Find the Right Audiologist: Service, Service, Service

    Nancy M. Williams, Founding Editor
    23 Jun 2015 | 9:00 am
    A musician with hearing loss offers tips on how to find the right audiologist for your needs—such as custom hearing aid settings for playing and performing.
  • The Chopin Prelude in A Major Amplified

    Cosmo Buono, Special Contributing Writer
    8 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
    The Chopin Prelude in A Major is a very short piece that offers a wonderful study in dynamics, color, and rubato. Find tips on how to achieve these effects.
  • Why I’m Going to the HLAA Convention

    Nancy M. Williams, Founding Editor
    11 May 2015 | 2:00 am
    As she gets ready to attend the HLAA convention, Nancy M. Williams reflects on how freeing it is to be part of this community of people with hearing loss.
  • American Grand, PBS Documentary, Created by Amateur Pianist

    Guest Writer
    27 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    A film director and amateur pianist describes the making of American Grand, a documentary depicting the drama of taking apart and rebuilding a grand piano.
  • The Wurlitzer

    Guest Writer
    13 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    In this literary short story by Christi Craig, a piano tuner reluctantly turns up at the house of a flighty woman who has no appreciation for her Wurlitzer.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical Commentary: Barry Lenson's Classical Music Blog

  • Getting Opinions Out of My Ears . . . or how I stopped thinking and enjoyed Wagner

    Barry Lenson
    11 Jun 2015 | 6:24 am
    “ If you wish to see truth, then hold no opinions for or against anything. The struggle of what you like and what you dislike is the disease of the mind.” - Hsin Shin Ming, “The Great Way”A few days ago I sat down to write a post about Richard Wagner. I planned to write something like this:Wagner’s early operas grew out of the German supernatural operas of Marschner and Weber . . . Wagner’s operas Tannhuser, Lohengrin and die fliegende Hollnder are in a line with those earlier works . . . at a certain point, Wagner got infatuated with the writings of Schopenhauer and Kant and…
  • Unlimited Music Online vs. My Old Record Collection

    Barry Lenson
    23 May 2015 | 5:05 am
    I promise that I am not going to write a post today about how wonderful things used to be when I was young and how awful they are today.  You wouldn’t want to read that kind of BS and frankly, I’m not interested in writing about it either.What I do want to write about, however, is how today’s streaming and video access to classical music – all we could want, anytime – is changing the way people encounter classical music for the first time. And of course, how they continue to interact with it over the course of their lives. Is the “new order” better or worse than the old? I…
  • Earth, Wind & Fire and Baroque Performance Norms

    Barry Lenson
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:24 am
    A while ago I really enjoyed Les Intouchables, a charming French sidekick movie about an unlikely friendship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic man and Dris, his African-born physical therapist. The theme music for the film is “September,” a song by the band Earth, Wind & Fire. And then later in the movie comes a feel-good scene when Dris leads a group of staid Parisians as they dance to "Boogie Wonderland," another song from Earth Wind & Fire. It’s fun, right? I have to admit that until I saw that movie, I had hardly heard of Earth Wind & Fire.  I guess that…
  • Did George Gershwin Orchestrate his Own Compositions? And Should We Care?

    Barry Lenson
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:40 am
    Back when I was in conservatory, I heard lots of students and faculty members dismiss George Gershwin (1897-1938) on the grounds that, “He couldn’t even orchestrate his own compositions.”I was reminded of that opinion the other day when I was listening on my car radio to “Catfish Row,” an orchestral suite from Gershwin’s opera Porgy and Bess. Boy, are those melodies wonderful. Boy, is that orchestration good. But I was unsettled to realize that the orchestration of that work simply sounds a lot different from that of An American in Paris,which has been getting a lot of air time…
  • Buy Your Tickets Today for the Chicago Bach Project’s St. John Passion on March 20

    Barry Lenson
    24 Feb 2015 | 7:11 am
    A year ago I encouraged my readers in Chicago to reserve tickets early for an upcoming performance of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion that took place at the Harris Theater. Some Chicagoans did just that and told me afterwards that the performance, conducted by John Nelson, was exceptionally inspiring.  Apparently John von Rhein, the music critic at the Chicago Tribune, agreed. In his review of Maestro Nelson and that performance, he wrote . . ."He led a splendid team of soloists, chorus and orchestra in a fervent, moving account of one of the great monuments of Western music. This was the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stars & Catz » Classical Music & Opera Buzz

  • Ensemble. Endlessly Memorable + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    3 Jul 2015 | 11:13 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Richard Wagner: Supreme Annihilator of the German War Gods – thinkclassical.blogspot.com In his book Wagner and Philosophy, Bryan Magee tells us that:Those of my readers who know Wagner only by his reputation may be surprised at the portrait I have presented so far of a left-wing revolutionary writing the […]
  • Ask Alice + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:45 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Ask Alice – www.mvdaily.com ‘Death of a Salesman’, with classical music agony aunt Alice McVeigh Continue Reading On www.mvdaily.com » Harlem Chamber Players: Mozart Wind Serenades in the Garden, FREE Outdoor Concert Monday, July 6 at 6 PM; Coming Soon, Symphonic Benefit for Civil Rights – africlassical.blogspot.com Mozart Wind […]
  • No Gold Given in the 2015 International Tchaikovsky Competition Violin Division + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    1 Jul 2015 | 10:14 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Fiona Shaw: 'Operas are more interesting than plays' – www.telegraph.co.uk The actress-director tells Rupert Christiansen why a dark Britten opera has lured her back to Glyndebourne Continue Reading On www.telegraph.co.uk » Vote Now: What Are the Greatest Art Songs of All Time? – collaborativepiano.blogspot.com Art song, the distressed poorer […]
  • The other Prokofiev + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:43 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Tell-Tale Too Far – lietofinelondon.wordpress.com At what point does art go too far? At what point do artists stop and think that perhaps their actions go beyond what is necessary to make a point? At what point do artists think they should speak up? I wonder if any of […]
  • Virtuosity with a human touch – An encounter with Matthew Sharp (part 1) + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    29 Jun 2015 | 9:13 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Doric Quartet Play with Lyricism, Subtlety and Flexibility at Aldeburgh – www.seenandheard-international.com  Haydn, Schubert, Britten, Adès: Doric Quartet (Alex Redington & Jonathan Stone [violins], Hèléne Clément [viola], John Myerscough [cello]) (A) Snape Maltings 26.6.2015 and (B) Aldeburgh Church 27.6.2015. (CS)   (A) Haydn: String Quartet in D Op.76 No.5 […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News Source. Est 2009.

  • FLASHBACK FRIDAY | Pinchas Zukerman – 1971, 22 Years Old [VIDEO]

    admin
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Amazing 1971 archival footage, of a then 22 year old Pinchas Zukerman performing Wieniawski’s ‘Polonaise in D Major’ – with American pianist Lawrence Smith. PINCHAS ZUKERMAN & LAWRENCE SMITH | WIENIAWSKI | POLONAISE IN D MAJOR | 1971 The post FLASHBACK FRIDAY | Pinchas Zukerman – 1971, 22 Years Old [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News Source. Est 2009..
  • Sydney Conservatory Dean Resigns Over Corporate Credit Card Enquiry

    admin
    2 Jul 2015 | 3:09 pm
    It has been reported today that Sydney Conservatorium of Music Dean, Professor Karl Kramer has resigned amidst an ongoing investigation into an alleged misuse of thousands of dollars on his corporate credit card. It was announced in April this year, the American-born head was set to step down in July 2015, citing personal reasons, but the Sydney Morning Herald has today reported Dr Kramer was “forced to resign” following the internal revenue enquiry. While exact figure have not been publicly disclosed, one item of contention is believed to be a dinner at a European restaurant totaling for…
  • THROWBACK THURSDAY | Stern, Gitlis, Haendel & Mintz – Vivaldi Concerto for 4 Violins [VIDEO]

    admin
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Legendary historical video footage of soloists Isaac Stern, Ivry Gitlis, Ida Haendel and Shlomo Mintz performing Vivaldi’s Concerto in B Minor for Four Violins – with conductor Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic. Recorded live at the 1983 Huberman Festival, in Israel. VIVALDI | CONCERTO FOR 4 VIOLINS | STERN, GITLIS, HAENDEL & MINTZ | ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC | 1983 The post THROWBACK THURSDAY | Stern, Gitlis, Haendel & Mintz – Vivaldi Concerto for 4 Violins [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News Source. Est 2009..
  • MEET THE PROS | Australian VC ‘Artist’ Ray Chen – ‘VC 20 Questions’ [VIDEO]

    admin
    1 Jul 2015 | 2:02 pm
    The Violin Channel recently caught up with 2009 Queen Elisabeth Competition 1st Prize winner, Australian VC ‘Artist’ Ray Chen – in Brussels. We sat the 26 year old violin virtuoso down for a fun game of ‘VC 20 Questions’ – to help gain some fascinating insight into the man behind the merry. MEET THE PROS | VC ’20 QUESTIONS’ | AUSTRALIAN VC ‘ARTIST’ RAY CHEN The post MEET THE PROS | Australian VC ‘Artist’ Ray Chen – ‘VC 20 Questions’ [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News…
  • Maestro Edo de Waart New Music Director of New Zealand Symphony

    admin
    1 Jul 2015 | 1:48 pm
    The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra has today announced Dutch conductor Edo de Waart as their new Music Director – effective March 2016. “I am delighted to deepen my artistic relationship with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra – an orchestra I have come to know well over the years,” de Waart has said, “ … we share a common bond – a mutual love and respect for excellent music-making and a desire to share this spirit with all New Zealanders.” Maestro De Waart, 74 in addition currently serves as Chief Conductor of the Royal Flemish Philharmonic, Music Director of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stephen P Brown

  • #PsalmQuest 46 progress 15: user friendly

    SPB
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Click on the image to enlarge   There is little point in creating anything if nobody can use it. Even you. What is the point of composing music if no-one can hear it? And how is anyone going to hear it if there is no sheet music for other musicians to play from? Well, they could guess and play by ear and with musical knowledge, and that is what happens in a great deal of live music – especially jazz, rock, gamelan, and other world cultures. But without the user-friendliness of sheet music, most Western Classical music would never make it into the audio of a hall (which is the…
  • #PsalmQuest 46 progress 14: admin

    SPB
    2 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Click on the image to enlarge   There is always something to do to wrap things up. Sometimes those tasks can seemingly take forever, but sometimes it is quick. Regardless, usually once we have created something new we want to be done. Finished. Dusted off and move on. But there is always something to do to wrap things up. In this case, uploading the new composition to the various services that allow you to hear it! Such as Youtube, Reverbnation and Soundcloud. Fortunately, after 45 #PsalmQuest compositions, I understand the process and can get through it pretty smoothly. What do you do…
  • #PsalmQuest 46 progress 13: extensions

    SPB
    1 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Click on the image to enlarge   You’ve finished the piece. It’s wonderful! Just needs a bit of editing. Right? Well, sometimes. What usually happens to me is that changes are made. Sometimes drastic changes. However, most of the time, during the editing phase I discover sections that do not seem to end quite right, or the transition into the next bit is a little awkward. Sometimes there is something so lovely it simply HAS to be repeated, albeit a little differently. So the piece ends up getting extended a little. And that’s just fine. Apart from the recent trend of…
  • #PsalmQuest 46 progress 12: not quite done

    SPB
    29 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    Click on the image to enlarge   There can be a tremendous peace to ending a piece of music not with a bang, crash, wallop, but gently, calmly, and quietly. Just because the last few bars now exist does not mean the composition is finished. Oh no! Now comes the refining, the editing, the tweaking here and there, making sure the instruments are balanced, the dynamics are appropriate, and any articulations are used consistently. It’s like fishing. Just because you caught a fish does not mean your trip is over and you can have dinner! No, there is much cleanup and preparation to do…
  • Time, Location, Bewilderment

    SPB
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:26 am
      What barriers are there to enjoying live classical music?   Time is perhaps our most precious and simultaneously wasted possession. (Click to Tweet) Location, location, location. All cliches are born out of truth. (Click to Tweet) Bewilderment drives our fears and prevents us from living life to the full. (Click to Tweet)   Over the past couple of weeks one of my projects has been soliciting from folk in various stages of life what interferes with their enjoyment of live classical music. On one level it has been a fascinating journey – mostly due to the participation…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Amati Magazine

  • BLOG: Stand by me – and my violin – and purr…

    Jessica Duchen
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:01 am
    Something cute for the weekend. Whether this kitten is trying to help or disrupt her human’s efforts isn’t clear. Maybe she just wants to play with that nice piece of wood and horsehair he is moving about. Thanks to Love Meow and a doughty Facebook friend for sending it our way. The post BLOG: Stand by me – and my violin – and purr… appeared first on The Amati Magazine.
  • NEWS: Flying fur at the Tchaikovsky Competition

    Jessica Duchen
    1 Jul 2015 | 11:26 pm
    Yu-Chien Tseng No first prize has been awarded in the violinists’ category of the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Russia. Silver medal and second prize went to Yu-Chien Tseng, 20, from Taiwan. Bronze and third prize was shared between no fewer than three contestants: Alexandra Conunova, 26 (Moldova), and two Russian candidates, Haik Kazazyan, 32, and Pavel Milyukov, 31. Clara-Jumi Kang, 28 (Germany) was fourth and Bomsori Kim, 25 (South Korea), fifth. Only two gold medals have been awarded in the violin category since 1990. Yu-Chien Tseng has an impressive track record…
  • YOUNG ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Charlotte Barbour-Condini, recorder

    Amati Q&#38;A
    1 Jul 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Charlotte Barbour-Condini in the BBC Young Musician of the Year competition, 2012   The former Young Musician of the Year finalist is pushing herself towards a range of exciting ventures, from baroque/jazz fusion to a history degree and a special new initiative to help increase awareness of diversity in the classical music field. She’s also Amati’s first recorder player interviewee…   Charlotte, is your family musical? How and when did you realise you wanted to be a musician? Although neither of my parents played instruments after their school years, they both…
  • NEWS: New roles for Rattle

    Jessica Duchen
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:10 am
    Rattle, reaching out. Photo: Creative Commons Sir Simon Rattle has been appointed Artist-in-Association at the Barbican Centre and also – crucially – at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. The organisation, making the announcement during a week of exciting Rattle projects in the Square Mile, declares that the posts will drive forward ‘his desire to bring performance, orchestral practice, artistic creation, learning and discovery together in a single vision for the future’. It is no small coup for the GSMD to establish an association with a figure of such world…
  • REVIEW: Danish String Quartet/CLF

    Peter Quantrill
    30 Jun 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Plaisterers’ Hall, London, 22 June 2015 With the big bang that launches his F minor String Quartet Op.5, Nielsen seems to say: Here I am, ready to face the great tradition head on. In this City of London Festival performance, the Danish String Quartet created an explosion that radiated after-shocks through the rest of the movement, where other ensembles have created a slower-burning surge. This is not to say that the DSQ were unconsidered or impulsive: absolute unanimity of tone and gesture were defining characteristics of the concert as a whole. In the simple octave-unison song which opens…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    CMUSE

  • Now you can see what it’s like to study at the Juilliard School, thanks to a new app

    Jordan Smith
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:32 am
    Do you have an ambition to study at the Juilliard School one day? Or maybe you’ve just always wondered what it looks like behind the scenes? You can find out with the help of the new Juilliard Open Studios app released on the iTunes store last month. Rather than serving as a way to access learning material or take courses, the idea behind the app is to give viewers a glimpse of the artistic process at the world famous conservatory. The format is a series of episodes between 20 and 35 minutes long, showing students and teachers engaged in various aspects of music and dance practice. Seven…
  • Watch Bach’s Prelude and Fugue in C Major rendered as a beautiful digital animation

    Angelica Frey
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:17 am
    Is Bach the most “visual” composer ever? You may remember that The Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, when it served as the opener of Disney’s Fantasia in 1941, was accompanied by a sequence of abstract animations, from glimmering celestial-like bodies to sand dunes reflecting a reddish light. Animator Alan Warburton recently conceived a similar idea, and thus created a sleek, simple yet stunning animation called “Bach in Lights,” featuring Prelude and Fugue in C Major from The Well Tempered Clavier. Given the complexity of those two pieces, Warburton realized he needed to create a…
  • The U.S. Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps Preserves Colonial Music and History

    Cynthia Collins
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:03 am
    Fife and drum corps ensembles are familiar sights during the Fourth of July celebrations and other patriotic special events. These small groups of military musicians played an important role both on and off the battlefield during the American Revolution. To preserve the corps’ history and music, The United States Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps was founded in 1960 and has been the official escort to every United States president since John F. Kennedy. This ensemble is part of the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment known as The Old Guard. According to the regiment’s mission statement, their role…
  • The Moonlight Sonata played on the harp guitar sounds more wistful than the original

    Angelica Frey
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:26 am
    We all liked the romantic, longing and vaguely haunting tone of the first movement of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata, which actually owns its name to a remark by music critic Ludwig Rellstab. Rellstab, in fact, compared the effect of the first movement to the shimmers of moonlight on the surface of Lake Lucerne. For composer Hector Berlioz, the melody of the first movement, which he defined as a  lamentation,  “is one of those poems that human languages does not know how to qualify,” while Beethoven’s student Carl Czerny envisioned it as a “nocturnal scene in which a mournful…
  • Soviet Airliner Doubles As Musical Instrument

    D Grant Smith
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:21 am
    Technology that takes music and machines formerly purposed for other endeavors and combines them into something transformational has hit Moscow. At the recent Polytech Festival, a soviet airliner was converted into a massive percussion instrument and used in a duet with Russian pop artist Jekka. The performance was a part of the festival’s art programs, one of many taking place across the globe. The Playtronica Collective has been using various educational platforms as features to bring communities together through music technology. In Moscow, they converted a Yakolev Yak-42 jetliner to an…
Log in