Classical Music

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Peter’s Gelb’s last gambit gets low and personal

    Slipped Disc
    norman lebrecht
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:55 am
    The letter sent by Peter Gelb to every member of Metropolitan Opera staff was ostensibly intended to give advance warning of a lockout that will ensue if their unions do not agree to Gelb’s cuts by the end of next week. Its real purpose was to make ordinary people think about the personal cost of a lockout to themselves and their families, to drive a wedge of anxiety between individual workers and their union negotiators. Fear is the oldest tactic in the HR book and Gelb is wielding it because he has nothing else up his sleeve. The one person who has not considered the personal cost of…
  • 31 Days of Classical, Day 23: An authoritative cello

    Classical Music Features from Minnesota Public Radio
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:34 pm
    31 Days is a bite-sized month-long trial of Classical Music from across the spectrum of this wonderful, expansive music we love at Classical MPR. Today, we're looking at the first movement of Edward Elgar's Cello Concerto.
  • Audiences can cope if given the opportunity

    On An Overgrown Path
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:19 am
    In that photo senior Tibetan Buddhist monk Kenrap-la is introduced to Jonathan Harvey's Body Mandala for the first time. He is listening via my iPod as we approach his monastery at Thiksay at the end of the arduous 800 km drive from Kalka in the foothills of the Himalayas to Ladakh on the border of India and Tibet. When I took the photo we were 15,000 feet above sea level and more than 1000 km from the nearest concert hall, in a region where symphony orchestras are unknown and Western art music is culturally alien. Yet, despite this, Kenrap-la listened engrossed for the whole fifteen minutes…
  • Ramadan nights

    On An Overgrown Path
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:13 am
    Qawwali music at the shrine of the Sufi saint Nizamuddin Auliya in Delhi after sunset last Saturday. My Ramadan nights are being spent at a Buddhist puja in Ladakh, a Sufi ritual in India, the Freiburg Opera Parsifal in Norwich, and, finally, at William Byrd's Mass for Five Voices in the beautiful church of St Peter and St Paul in Salle, Norfolk. At the Salzburg Summer Festival during Ramadan there are performances of Sufi chants by an Egyptian brotherhood, the premiere of a work celebrating the Sufi martyr Mansur al-Hallağ by the Palestinan-Israeli composer Samir Odeh-Tamimi coupled with…
  • For the Netherlands

    On An Overgrown Path
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:37 am
    July 23rd is a day of mourning in the Netherlands for the victims of the Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 tragedy. My wife and I were particularly moved by this tragedy as our flight from Delhi to London a few days later was rerouted away from Ukrainian airspace - the photo was taken by me at Shey Tibetan Buddhist monastery in India. As a tribute to the victims of all nationalities I offer a link to a recording of the Dutch composer Lex van Delden's 1981 Musica di Catasto. Lex van Delden (1919-88) knew tragedy himself as a Jew in the Nazi occupied Netherlands. His music was championed by Bernard…
 
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    Slipped Disc

  • Flash! Yuja’s latest skimpies

    norman lebrecht
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:19 am
    Yuja Wang, the Chinese pinaist, made her name in the Hollywood Bowl three years ago in a scrap of orange. She was back last night, having refreshed the wardrobe. The new outfits: photo credit: (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)   Mark Swed’s review here.   One more (or less):    
  • Death of a prominent viola player

    norman lebrecht
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:40 am
    The Hungarian virtuoso Ervin Schiffer, viola player of the Haydn Quartet and its forerunner, the Dekany Quartet, has died at the age of 82. Born in Hungary, he moved to Holland and taught there at the leading conservatories. Our condolences to his wife and quartet partner Kati Sebestyen (pictured).  
  • Just in: Poland cancels Russian culture year

    norman lebrecht
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:16 am
    The Polish government has cancelled all cultural exchanges with Russia for next year. ‘The Council of Ministers decided to call off the Polish Year in Russia and the Russian Year in Poland, planned for 2015,’ said government spokesperson Malgorzata Kidawa-Blonska. ‘This is the decision of the government, but both the foreign and culture ministers – Radoslaw Sikorski and Malgorzata Omilanowska respectively – unequivocally came to the conclusion that in [this] situation [after the MH167 disaster], it is impossible to follow through […] with the organisation of the Polish…
  • Peter’s Gelb’s last gambit gets low and personal

    norman lebrecht
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:55 am
    The letter sent by Peter Gelb to every member of Metropolitan Opera staff was ostensibly intended to give advance warning of a lockout that will ensue if their unions do not agree to Gelb’s cuts by the end of next week. Its real purpose was to make ordinary people think about the personal cost of a lockout to themselves and their families, to drive a wedge of anxiety between individual workers and their union negotiators. Fear is the oldest tactic in the HR book and Gelb is wielding it because he has nothing else up his sleeve. The one person who has not considered the personal cost of…
  • Mr Pops is gone, at 96

    norman lebrecht
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:20 am
    Norman Leyden fronted the Oregon Symphony’s pop concerts for 34 years – and made the arrangements that are still used today.  
 
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    Adaptistration

  • Are You Making This Critical Mistake?

    Drew McManus
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    There is a fascinating post by Joe Patti up at Butts In The Seats, which in turn, is examining a post from Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq at MABlogs about ownership of an artist’s booking data; for example, name and contact information for arts org artistic administrators or performing arts center venue managers that are either leads or established contacts. Although the initial topic touched on the touchy issue of proprietary data (spoiler: it belongs to the artist, not the agent), it is an excellent gateway to a topic that comes up like clockwork via my consulting work: “how do I…
  • One Simple Key To Getting The Most Out Of Your Artist Agent Retainer

    Drew McManus
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    There is a fascinating post by Joe Patti up at Butts In The Seats, which in turn, is examining a post from Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq at MABlogs about ownership of an artist’s booking data; for example, name and contact information for arts org artistic administrators or performing arts center venue managers that are either leads or established contacts. Although the initial topic touched on the touchy issue of proprietary data (spoiler: it belongs to the artist, not the agent), it is an excellent gateway to a topic that comes up like clockwork via my consulting work: “how do I…
  • Yep, Email Newsletters Are Still Awesome

    Drew McManus
    22 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    It can be all too easy to overlook the need for driving email subscription conversion but make no mistake, email is still an enormously powerful tool, even in the wake of SMS and social media based messaging. Nonetheless, after taking a closer look at Adaptistration’s Weekly Email Subscriber list the other week and noticing the mostly consistent increase of 3.5 percent each month since late 2012 without so much as a single post directing readers over, it seems like a good time to rectify that oversight. Ideally, you should do what I just did for the past 18 months but at the same time,…
  • The Golden Age Of Orchestras & Opera Are At An End

    Drew McManus
    21 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    If you’re the type of person who forms an opinion about an article by reading the headline, you may be disappointed with today’s post. This isn’t going to be a lengthy commentary on how the field is overbuilt, classical music is dying, and the only way to save the future is via wholesale slashing of budgets. Instead, this is a post about the unique period of transition out of a time punctuated by tremendous accomplishment, growth, and output fueled in large part by record fundraising, comparative labor harmony, and improved governance; i.e. a Golden Age. One would be hard…
  • Time To Update Your Passwords

    Drew McManus
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    It’s been more than a year since the last reminder which means it is high time to remind everyone to update your passwords, especially ones related to work at your arts org. Hacker activity hasn’t subsided since a big spike at the beginning of the calendar year and one of the most useful steps in shutting down hackers before they get anywhere is using a strong password. Yes, strong passwords are a pain in the ass to remember and it is so much easier to pick something easy and burry your head in the sand, but you aren’t doing yourself any favors. We’ve covered this…
 
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    NewMusicBox

  • An Rx for Improvisation

    Jenny Undercofler
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:15 am
    Improvisation offers valuable educational applications and allows students to get their feet wet in the world of new music without being tied down to some of the technical challenges inherent in much modern repertoire.
  • James Lee III—Don’t Miss a Chance

    Molly Sheridan
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:44 am
    Whether inspired by history, Biblical texts, or purely sonic ideas, Baltimore-based composer James Lee III's music explores a landscape rich in color and rhythmic texture.
  • Charlie Haden (1937-2014)—One of the Greatest

    Carla Bley
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:57 am
    Death sucks, not for the person who dies—it's mostly a rational solution—but for the people who live on with the absence of a favorite living, breathing creature. There is a creepy scrawled note on my desk with “call Charlie” crossed off. For the past few years, we had been talking about making another Liberation Music Orchestra album.
  • Sounds Heard: Dan Becker—Fade

    Alexandra Gardner
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:25 am
    This selection of chamber works composed between 1993 and 2008 suggest that Becker has an "on/off" switch resulting in either intensely energetic music, or in work of concentrated repose. There isn't a lot in-between, but clearly such extremes suit the composer.
  • Why “Don’t Play for Free” Is Not Enough

    Daphne Carr
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:53 am
    I’ve been thinking a lot about this over the last two weeks because I felt that this was an unrealistic route to change. Here are some reasons why I think that the statement isn’t sufficient to address the problem of unpaid gigs.
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    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

  • For Elaine Stritch

    Alex Ross
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:28 pm
    The seemingly indestructible diva has died at the age of eighty-nine. Sarah Larson remembers her on the New Yorker website. Stritch's immortal versions of "The Ladies Who Lunch" have been widely shared, so I thought I'd feature this clip from her final run of Café Carlyle shows, in which she singles out one of her most ardent fans. (Levine famously went to see Elaine Stritch at Liberty fourteen times.) The recent documentary Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me captures her splendidly.
  • Recent work

    Alex Ross
    6 Jul 2014 | 11:24 am
    Shattered Passage. The New Yorker, July 7, 2014. The Met's Klinghoffer Problem. New Yorker website, June 25, 2014. Blockbuster. The New Yorker, June 23, 2014.
  • Midsummer hiatus

    Alex Ross
    9 Jun 2014 | 8:19 pm
  • Midsummer miscellany

    Alex Ross
    6 Jun 2014 | 8:40 pm
    The NYPhil Biennial may be winding down, but the schedule will remain lively through much of June. Opera Cabal stages Georg Friedrich Haas's ATTHIS at the Kitchen, June 12-13; the same weekend, Chelsea Opera presents Copland's The Tender Land. Alexandre Lunsqui is the featured composer at the Chelsea Music Festival. The Early Music Festival NYC, a new initiative under the direction of Jolle Greenleaf and Donald Meineke, has a rich week of concerts June 13-19, culminating in a reprise of the Green Mountain Project's legendary Vespers 1610. Caramoor is offering this summer a Garden of Sonic…
  • Unglaublich

    Alex Ross
    6 Jun 2014 | 10:25 am
    From Anastasia Tsioulcas's NPR Classical Facebook page: "If you've been following the ongoing conversation about how women are treated in classical music today...an interesting and relevant incident took place between yesterday & today. A source told me yesterday that during a session of the League of American Orchestras conference that is taking place right now in Seattle, a representative of the Berliner Philharmoniker was talking to a roomful of classical music professionals, and said that the reason that 78% of users for their (excellent) Digital Concert Hall is male is…
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    Sequenza21/

  • Vijay Iyer–The Most Happy Fellow

    Jerry Bowles
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:42 am
    Vijay Iyer and the Brentano Quartet in a live performance of sections from Mutations at Greene Space Over the past two decades, Vijay Iyer has recorded some 18 albums of bold, genre-defying and original music that navigates the fine line between composition and improvisation, between jazz and New Music.  Although his restless musical imagination roams easily through both Carter and Monk territory, unearthing insights that evolve and morph over time, the gestures have largely been identifiable as jazz.   His new and first ECM recording—Mutations—unveils more of the composer side of the…
  • FCM on Monday

    Christian Carey
    20 Jul 2014 | 10:21 am
    On Monday, July 21st at 8 PM, the last concert of Tanglewood’s 2014 Festival of Contemporary Music is a well-stocked program of orchestral works. The centerpiece is Roger Sessions’s Concerto for Orchestra, a work commissioned by the BSO thirty years ago. Steven Mackey’s violin concerto Beautiful Passing will feature as soloist Sarah Silver, one of Tanglewood’s New Fromm Players. Music by John Adams has not in recent memory frequently been featured on FCM programs, but this year his Slonimsky’s Earbox makes an appearance. The sole work by a younger composer, The Sound of Stillness by…
  • The Importance of the New

    George Grella
    3 Jul 2014 | 9:38 am
    Marc Day and Patrick Fennig in “Brother Brother” In June I sat on a panel organized by Opera Cabal, in their visit to the Kitchen to produce Georg Haas’ Atthis, with two other critics, John Rockwell and Zachary Woolfe. While the audience was sparse, they were generally attentive and the talk, which began with the question of whether or not we missed City Opera, was varied and interesting. I was surprised, though, by how much we ended up talking about the Metropolitan Opera, and how Rockwell and Woolfe’s critical thinking is so involved in the context of not only what…
  • 2014 Ojai Music Festival – The Classical Style

    Paul Muller
    15 Jun 2014 | 2:07 pm
    The 2014 Ojai Music Festival opened on Thursday June 12 to begin 4 days packed with informative talks, movie screenings, parties and concerts. The Festival’s Music Director this year is Jeremy Denk and the resident musical groups included The Knights orchestral collective and the Brooklyn Rider string quartet. Friday night’s concert was built around an examination of the Classical period and featured a Haydn string quartet as well as the world premiere of a new opera – “The Classical Style” – by Jeremy Denk and Steven Stucky that was commissioned by the festival…
  • Dogstar 10: Experimental Music Concert Series in Los Angeles

    Paul Muller
    13 Jun 2014 | 11:32 am
    The annual Dogstar Orchestra concert series of experimental music has been going in various locations in and around Los Angeles since May 30. The venue on June 10 was the Wulf, a converted industrial loft space on Santa Fe street downtown, and a good-sized crowd settled in for an evening of spoken and electronic works. The concert was curated by Sara Roberts and Clay Chaplin. The concert opened with Black & White Oratorio by Robert Lax. A chorus of 15 voices and three soloists performed this piece which consists of groups of words for color that are spoken in various patterns and…
 
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    Classical Performance Podcast

  • The Calder Quartet Plays Haydn

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Calder Quartet plays Haydn in WGBH’s Studio One *** Franz Joseph Haydn: String Quartet in G Major, Op. 76, No. I Benjamin Jacobson and Andrew Bulbrook, violins; Jonathan Moerschel, viola; Eric Byers, cello +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on February 22, 2005 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts (photo of Calder Quartet by Autumn de Wilde)
  • Guitarist Eliot Fisk

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    21 Jun 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Turina - Fantasia Sevillanas Ponce - Porti mi Corazon Villa Lobos - Prelude No. 2 Eliot Fisk, guitar © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org (photo of Eliot Fisk by Keitaro Yoshioka)
  • Strauss's Piano Quartet

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    2 Jun 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Musicians from the Rockport Chamber Music Festival play music by Richard Strauss, in WCRB's Fraser Performance Studio *** Richard Strauss: Piano Quartet in C minor, Op.13 David Deveau, piano; Irina Muresanu, violin; Yinzi Kong, viola; Emmanuel Feldman, cello +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on June 4, 2008 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org (portrait of Richard Strauss by Max Liebermann, via Wikimedia Commons)
  • Sean Chen Plays Scriabin

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    18 May 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Sean Chen plays Alexander Scriabin’s Piano Sonata No. 5, in the Fraser Performance Studio *** Alexander Scriabin: Piano Sonata No. 5 Sean Chen, piano +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on April 26, 2013 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org
  • Chiara Plays Haydn

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    7 May 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Chiara String Quartet plays Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 20 No. 2 in C major, in the Fraser Performance Studio *** Franz Joseph Haydn: String Quartet Op. 20 No. 2 in C major Chiara String Quartet: Rebecca Fischer, violin; Hyeyung Julie Yoon, violin; Jonah Sirota, viola; Gregory Beaver, cello +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on October 23, 2013 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org (photo of Chiara Quartet by Roger Ressmeyer)
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    JDCMB

  • More good news! This time, music education

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    It's in short supply out there in the wider world, but in the UK's musical sphere, hot on the heels of Judith Weir's official appointment up top comes more good news. Protect Music Education says that their efforts have secured a £18m increase in funding for the country's "music hubs" for 2015/16, totalling£75m. Led by the Incorporated Society of Musicians, 134 musical organisations have been involved in Protect Music Education and their tireless campaigning has borne fruit.And now, hot on the heels of that news, comes a further triumph: the government has backed down on its ghastly plan to…
  • Great news for two wonderful composers, who happen to be women

    22 Jul 2014 | 12:25 am
    As of this morning, Judith Weir is officially Master of the Queen's Music. She is off to Buckingham Palace today for an audience with HM.She is also launching a blog, which you can follow from her website.Here's Tom Service's interview with her about what she plans to do with the post. Meanwhile, here is my interview from today's Independent with another marvellous British composer: the one and only Errollyn Wallen. Her new opera Anon is a very contemporary adaptation of Manon...and was partly inspired by her own experience of nearly getting murdered when travelling around Europe in her…
  • Wedges - of several kinds

    20 Jul 2014 | 5:03 am
    The thin end of one wedge is webcasting. I was supposed to be in Verbier now. Long boring story about storms, leaks and missed planes. I was planning to hear a tetralogy of my piano gods, and more, but am running after builders instead. Gutted to be missing Ferenc Rados and Grigory Sokolov - the latter still the man I regard as the greatest living pianist, and tragically one we will not hear in the UK any time soon (I understand he refuses to go through the visa rigmaroles that we require). But the good news - if wedgy - is that the concerts these past two nights featuring respectively Martha…
  • This is Jonas Kaufmann's next CD and look what's on it...

    19 Jul 2014 | 6:42 am
    A note for the Kaufmaniacs: this little box of delights is due out in September, we hear, and features Viennese and German operetta-plus.Du bist die Welt für mich will also enjoy a 2015 concert tour...but not to the UK, which is a crying shame. I would conjecture that this might be a poor reflection on how our tub-thumping tabloids affect British taste in music ("Germany 1930s, eew!"). Is it possible that the delights of Lehár, Kálmán, Tauber, Benatzky, etc, and, er, Korngold - and yes, there is Korngold (Marietta's Lute Song) - are still perceived as too hard a sell in Blighty for…
  • Dvorák's The Jacobin in Buxton, aka When Viktor Laszlo Went Home....

    18 Jul 2014 | 8:02 am
    In a gloriously sunny Buxton for our Alicia's Gift concert the other day, I took the opportunity to catch The Jacobin, a little-known opera by Dvorák that the doughty festival director Stephen Barlow, the conductor, had somehow, somewhere, found and resuscitated. Here he is, with director Stephen Unwin, talking about it and how it all happened:Result? An absolute joy - indeed with a great, warm heart. This is Dvorák in Slavonic Dances mode, glittery and foot-tappy and soulful, with a touching family twist and a subplot that was almost surreal in its clash of two worlds.The opera ostensibly…
 
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    Ionarts

  • Ionarts-at-Large: Mozart-Woche 2014 (CPE Bach Oratorio)

    jfl
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:12 pm
    In the current issue of AUDITORIUM: Picture courtesy Salzburg Mozart Woche, © Wolfgang Lienbacher
  • Free Concert Series at National Building Museum

    Charles T. Downey
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:43 am
    Charles T. Downey, National Building Museum kicks off summer concert series with Reverb Washington Post, July 22, 2014 For parents of young children, summer often boils down to a frantic search for activities that will divert their kids, even for just a few minutes. By mid-July, the situation can get desperate, so the first summer concert at the National Building Museum, heard Sunday afternoon,
  • Notes from the 2014 Salzburg Festival ( 1 ) Bach Recital • Pierre-Laurent Aimard

    jfl
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:13 am
    Recital • Pierre-Laurent Aimard A Happy Spiritual Vortex For a couple years, the Salzburg Festival has opened its doors a week earlier than traditionally, dubbing the prequel to the Festival—officially part of it, but taking place before the official opening ceremony— “Ouverture spirituelle”. It began on the 18th with the BRSO and Haitink in Haydn’s Creation. On Saturday came the first highlight—
  • NSO at Wolf Trap

    Charles T. Downey
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:09 am
    Ravel, Piano Concertos (inter alia), J.-Y. Thibaudet, Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, C. Dutoit (Decca, 1997) Charles T. Downey, National Symphony Orchestra shines in quiet moments at Wolf Trap (Washington Post, July 21, 2014) The National Symphony Orchestra’s summer season at Wolf Trap includes a lot of fluff, quite appropriately. Friday night’s concert in the Filene Center was an
  • Perchance to Stream: Tour de France Edition

    Charles T. Downey
    20 Jul 2014 | 8:20 am
    Here is your regular Sunday selection of links to online audio and online video from the week gone by. After clicking to an audio or video stream, press the "Play" button to start the broadcast. Some of these streams become unavailable after a few days. Listen to a recital of Lieder by Schubert and Wolf, performed by baritone Florian Boesch and pianist Malcolm Martineau at the Wigmore Hall in
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    The Rambler

  • Contemporary Notation Project: Michael Baldwin

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:06 am
    It gives me great pleasure to welcome Michael Baldwin as the Rambler’s first ever guest poster. Michael is an American artist currently living in Huddersfield, who works around the medium of sound, specifically in contemporary concert-hall music performance contexts. In his words, he is ‘primarily invested in examining the margins of musical performance practice through … Continue reading →
  • Bryn Harrison: Vessels (Recent releases from another timbre, part 3)

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    11 Jul 2014 | 4:26 am
    (This post is part of a series looking at recent releases by Sheffield’s another timbre label. See here for the introduction.) Bryn Harrison | Vessels | Philip Thomas, piano | another timbre (at69) Of the current batch of another timbre CDs that I’m reviewing, this one seems the most problematic. I’ve raved about Bryn Harrison’s music … Continue reading →
  • Laurence Crane: Chamber Works 1992–2009 (Recent releases from another timbre, part 2)

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    (This post is part of a series looking at recent releases by Sheffield’s another timbre label. See here for the introduction.) Laurence Crane | Chamber Works 1992–2009 | Apartment House | another timbre (at74x2) For newcomers to the world of experimental music – hovering happily between composition and improvisation, determinism and experiment – to which another timbre dedicates itself, this is … Continue reading →
  • Recent releases from another timbre, part I

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    7 Jul 2014 | 3:45 am
    Sheffield’s indie new music label another timbre have been on a heck of a burn the last few months, and two more luscious looking discs have recently fallen through the door this week. With the eyes of the sporting world turned on God’s own county thanks to the opening stages of the Tour de France, I figured the time had come … Continue reading →
  • Secret Music: July

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    2 Jul 2014 | 5:37 am
    (Click for the background to the Secret Music listings.) Friday 4 July: Silk Street Music Hall, GSMD | Plus Minus | 7.00pm | FREE Plus-Minus ensemble present five new works by postgraduate Guildhall composers, and a rare opportunity to hear Peter Ablinger’s experimental Amtssee bei Regen. Friday 4 July: St Mary at Hill | 7.30pm | £8 advance/£10 on … Continue reading →
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    Opera Today

  • Il turco in Italia at the Aix Festival

    vmmilenski@yahoo.com
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:51 am
    Twenty years ago stage director Christopher Alden introduced Rossini’s then forgotten comedy to Southern California audiences in a production that is still remembered. In Aix Alden has revisited this complex work that many critics now consider Rossini’s greatest comedy.
  • First Night of the BBC Proms : Elgar The Kingdom

    vmmilenski@yahoo.com
    20 Jul 2014 | 3:02 pm
    The BBC Proms 2014 season began with Sir Edward Elgars The Kingdom (1903-6). It was a good start to the season,which commemorates the start of the First World War. From that perspective Sir Andrew Davis's The Kingdom moved me deeply.
  • Le nozze di Figaro, Munich

    vmmilenski@yahoo.com
    19 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
    One is unlikely to come across a cast of Figaro principals much better than this today, and the virtues of this performance indeed proved to be primarily vocal.
  • Winterreise and Trauernacht at the Aix Festival

    vmmilenski@yahoo.com
    19 Jul 2014 | 7:13 am
    That’s A Winter’s Journey and A Night of Mourning for metteurs-en-scène William Kentridge (South Africa) and Katie Mitchell (Great Britain), completing the clean sweep of English language stage directors for the Aix Festival productions this year.
  • James Gilchrist at Wigmore Hall

    vmmilenski@yahoo.com
    18 Jul 2014 | 10:50 am
    Assured elegance, care and thoughtfulness characterised tenor James Gilchrist’s performance of Schubert’s Schwanengesang at the Wigmore Hall, the cycles’ two poets framing a compelling interpretation of Beethoven’s An die ferne Geliebte.
 
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    aworks :: "new" american classical music

  • Electrikaleidoscope (1972). George Rochbert #listeninglog #rock #nostalgia

    rgable
    14 Jul 2014 | 8:12 pm
    George Rochberg's Electrikaleidoscope, with its amplified ensemble of flute, clarinet, cello, piano and electronic piano, is an artifact of the Seventies. From a Village Voice review: Though this piece has its amusing moments and seems tongue-in-cheek for a while, it leaves one with the impression that a serious statement has been made. Throughout the work the composer never stands above the traditions he is referring to, taking potshots at them, but relates to each one on a sincere level, employing his own astute craftsmanship to make his own kind of Beethoven and his own kind of rock……
  • Henry Jacobs. Sonata for Loudspeaker (1953-54) #listeninglog #kpfa

    rgable
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:28 pm
    Henry Jacobs is a name new to me. He is an American sound artist who presented taped recordings at KPFA in Berkeley in the 1950s. As of 2005, he was living somewhere on the coast of Northern California. So far, the music is only of historical interest. listening log: Henry Jacobs. Sonata for Loudspeaker. Radio Programm no.1: Henry Jacobs' Music and Folklore Henry Jacobs. Loop 2-Channel Rhythms. Radio Programm no.1: Henry Jacobs' Music and Folklore James P. Johnson. Felicity Rag. William Albright - Ragtime James P. Johnson. Eccentricity-Syncopated Waltz. William Albright - Ragtime James P.
  • aworks listening log :: july 12, 2014 #glass #lively #good-spirited

    rgable
    12 Jul 2014 | 9:08 am
    Philip Glass. Metamorphosis. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Mad Rush. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Piece in the Shape of a Square. Clair Chase - Density Judith Shatin. View from Mt. Nebo. Eva Gruesser, Andre Emelianoff - Dreamtigers Dan Trueman. Five (and-a-half) Gardens Elliott Carter. Holiday Overture. Kenneth Schermerhorn: Nashville Symphony Orchestra - Carter: Piano Concerto, Symphony #1, Holiday Overture Lou Harrison. Music for Violin with Various Instruments. Oakland Youth Orchestra, Robert Hughes, Thomas Halpin Lou Harrison. Two…
  • aworks listening log :: july 12, 2014 #glass #lively #good-spirited

    rgable
    12 Jul 2014 | 9:07 am
    Philip Glass. Metamorphosis. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Mad Rush. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Piece in the Shape of a Square. Clair Chase - Density Judith Shatin. View from Mt. Nebo. Eva Gruesser, Andre Emelianoff - Dreamtigers Dan Trueman. Five (and-a-half) Gardens Elliott Carter. Holiday Overture. Kenneth Schermerhorn: Nashville Symphony Orchestra - Carter: Piano Concerto, Symphony #1, Holiday Overture Lou Harrison. Music for Violin with Various Instruments. Oakland Youth Orchestra, Robert Hughes, Thomas Halpin Lou Harrison. Two…
  • aworks favorites :: john cage

    rgable
    4 Jul 2014 | 7:39 pm
    Four2 (1990) Latvian Radio Choir - Mythes Étoilés Three Dances (1945) Xenia Pestova - Works for Two Keyboards - 2 The Unavailable Memory of (1944) Alexei Lubimov - As It Is Philipp Vandré - Complete Short Works for Prepared Piano A Room (1943) Giancarlo Simonacci - Cage: Complete Music for Prepared Piano Imaginary Landscape No. 1 (1939) Forbidden Planets (Music From The Pioneers Of Electronic Sound) Wikipedia: Four Imaginary Landscape John Cage John Cage compositions Alexei Lubimov A Room The Unavailable Memory of  YouTube:  A Room - Giancarlo Simonacci The Unavailable Memory of…
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    parterre box

  • The battle is on

    La Cieca
    23 Jul 2014 | 1:27 pm
    “The labor strife at the Metropolitan Opera took on a new urgency Wednesday, when the company’s general manager, Peter Gelb, sent its orchestra, chorus, stagehands and other workers letters warning them to prepare for a lockout if no contract deal is reached by next week.” [New York Times]
  • You’ll get no argument from me

    La Cieca
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:54 pm
    “Renee Fleming appears to be having as much fun as the audience with her send-up of a fragile opera diva.” [Troy Record]
  • Play your hunch

    Poison Ivy
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
    Bel Canto at Caramoor is something that I’ve always wanted to attend but never have because … well because frankly I’m just too lazy during the summers, and I’m also a big baby about outdoor performances. What if it’s torrential downpour? What if it’s 100 degrees? What if it’s a five hour opera and it sucks and there’s no way of peacing out? What if the cast sucks? I’d rather focus on the three big B’s during the summer: Ballet, Beach, and Big Brother. Yesterday I popped my Caramoor cherry. The whole experience was fairly pleasant, although the air was quite chilly by…
  • The curse of drink

    John Yohalem
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:46 am
    Two operas both alike in dignity, set in dimly lit Renaissance towns ruled by seething, conspiratorial courts. Parties blaze, alleyway shadows threaten, half the characters are spies or bravos for the other half, plus a few on spec. Love is in short supply, usually twisted. What these folks need is a competent social worker with a dagger-proof vest and a cast-iron stomach. What they get is melody to live upon and die upon, melody as rich and various as the forms of pasta.   This summer, Will Crutchfield’s annual Bel Canto program at the Caramoor estate in Katonah, New York, focused on the…
  • Funspielhaus

    La Cieca
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Our Own Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin (not pictured) gets all giddy and girlish as she salutes the opening of the 103rd Bayreuth Festival this week. Bayreuth Follies Members of the Bayreuther Festspielorchester Tennessee Bassoon Quartet Members of the Berliner Philharmoniker 01 – Gabriel Fauré/André Messager: Souvenirs de Bayreuth 02 – Arthur Kulling: Assoziationen eines Geigers beim Wotan-Monolog 03 – Arthur Kulling: Siegfried-Walzer 04 – Antonin Dvorák: Larghetto from Terzetto Nr. 2 for Violins and Viola 05 – Emmanuel Chabrier: Souvenirs de Muniche 06 – Vittorio Monti:…
 
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    The Wagnerian

  • OU Offers Free Undergraduate Course

    22 Jul 2014 | 2:33 pm
    While it may seem a little off topic,  there are certainly things here of interest to those with an interest  in Wagner. We recently discovered that the Open University offers a number of distance learning course on-line and for free.  While nodoubt intended to offer "tasters" to their full graduate and undergraduate course many of the modules themselves - for that is what they appear to be - would seem to offer something of interest for more than a few people. We have gone through the list available under "Arts and History" and have selected a few we thought general readers…
  • Where To Listen To Bayrueth 2014 - Free

    22 Jul 2014 | 12:56 pm
    Yes, its that time of year again. As always there are multiple places to listen to the Bayreuth festival live on the net but alas, should you not have any German they can be difficult to traverse. So, with that in mind we list the live performances available to listen to below. Clicking a link will take you directly to the player which should then allow you to listen to the performance - on the date specified.Note: Clicking the link pay lead to a "popup". If so, you may need to temporarily disable any popup blocker you use for these links. July 25 - TANNHAUSER. Starts 14.00 GMT. Click Here To…
  • Wagner Festival - Norfolk

    9 Jul 2014 | 10:06 am
    Epic Operas Come To Norfolk as Dynamic Company Makes Theatre Royal Debut THEATER FREIBURGThe scale, dynamic vision and sheer grandeur of two of Wagner’s epic works are set to provide a summer treat in rural Norfolk as one of Europe’s most highly-regarded opera companies leave their German base for some major UK dates.Theater Freiburg will swap the German city where they have been presenting opera for over 100 years for a temporary summer home at Norwich Theatre Royal to present both Parsifal and Tannhäuser.Peter Wilson, chief executive of Norwich Theatre Royal, said: “I am absolutely…
  • Joachim Köhler & Why Wagner Did Not Cause The Holocaust.

    29 Jun 2014 | 7:49 pm
    "Wagner always considered himself a spiritual revolutionary whose concern was the liberation of human beings, including the Jews, from their so-called 'curse'. Joachim Köhler. The Wagner JournalWhile there is much of interest in the July issue of the Wagner Journal, perhaps Joachim Köhler's reversal on the centrality of Wagner's antisemitism in his work, his influence on the the Third Reich and the persecution of the Jews; is one of the most interesting, extraordinary and "brave" "turn-a-rounds" in Wagner research. But first a little background:Köhler first came to…
  • New Issue Of The Wagner Journal Now Available

    29 Jun 2014 | 5:10 pm
    The July 2014 issue (vol.8, no.2), now available, contains the following feature articles:• 'Spinning the Yarn: Intertextuality in Wagner's Use and Reuse of his Songs in his Operas' by Malcolm Miller• 'Richard Wagner and the "Zurich Writings" 1849–51: From Revolution to Ring' by Hilda Meldrum Brown• ‘Wagner's Acquittal', in which Joachim Köhler retracts his claim that Wagner was a forerunner of the Holocaust (See the Wagnerian's "review" here)• ‘Reckoning up the Ring: A Mathematician's Diary of Bayreuth 1876' by Patrick Carnegy, discussing the journal kept by Alfred Pringsheim,…
 
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    Naxos AudioBooks New Releases

  • COLLINS, W.: Moonstone (The) (Unabridged) (NA0162)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Upon inheriting the Moonstone, a huge and priceless diamond, Rachel Verinder’s delight turns to dismay when the gem suddenly disappears. But this is no ordinary theft. Sergeant Cuff of Scotland Yard is called in and immediately suspects an intricate plot. However, not even his powers of detection can penetrate fully the mysteries surrounding the diamond. And as we listen to each character’s version of the events, layer upon layer of drama and suspense build to the final and astonishing denouement of this magnificent, classic English detective novel.
  • HARDY, T.: Far from the Madding Crowd (Unabridged) (NA0154)

    31 May 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In a remote corner of early Victorian England, where traditional practices remain untouched by time, Bathsheba Everdene stands out as a beacon of feminine independence and self-reliance. However, when confronted with three suitors, among them the dashing Captain Troy, she shows a reckless capriciousness that threatens the stability of the whole community. Published in 1847, and an immediate best-seller, Far From the Madding Crowd established Thomas Hardy as one of Britain’s foremost novelists.
  • LAWRENCE, D.H.: Lady Chatterley's Lover (Unabridged) (NA0027)

    31 May 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Lady Chatterley’s husband returns from the War paralysed from the waist down. Frustrated by his attitudes as much as his disability, she begins a love-affair with the gamekeeper, Mellors. She realises that to be fully alive she must live the life of the body as well as the mind, but in doing so she angers the conventions of her day. Banned for over 30 years for the explicit nature of its language and descriptions of sex, Lady Chatterley’s Lover also exposes the dehumanisation of the mechanical age, and underlines the profound power of tenderness.
  • HEYER, G.: Masqueraders (The) (Unabridged) (NA0179)

    30 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    After participating in the Jacobite Rising of 1745, Robin and Prudence, brother and sister, become engaged in a swashbuckling, romantic adventure. Our hero and heroine must cross-dress and switch genders if they are to escape prosecution—a humorous move that allows Heyer to explore the manners and language affectations of the period as the two romp through the elite saloons and clubs of London. But what the two don’t foresee is that they might fall in love along the way: Prudence with the elegant and dashing Sir Anthony Fanshawe, and Robin with the charming Letitia Grayson. Can…
  • HEYER, G.: Venetia (Unabridged) (NA0183)

    30 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Venetia Lanyon, beautiful, intelligent and independent, lives in comfortable seclusion in rural Yorkshire with her precocious brother Aubrey. Her future seems safe and predictable: either marriage to the respectable but dull Edward Yardley, or a life of peaceful spinsterhood. But when she meets the dashing, dangerous rake Lord Damerel, her well-ordered life is turned upside down, and she embarks upon a relationship with him that scandalises and horrifies the whole community. Has she found her soul-mate, or is she playing with fire?
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    Kenneth Woods- conductor

  • Karajan 25th Anniversary Perspectives part 2- Music of Mozart, Brahms, Strauss, Strauss and Wagner

    Kenneth Woods
    18 Jul 2014 | 3:15 am
    In part 2 of my look back at the work of the still-controversial Herbert von Karajan, who died 25 years ago this week, I share an essay from Warner Classic’s new box set of music by Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, J and R Strauss and Wagner recorded for EMI. A fascinating collection- some surprises, one complete disaster (guess which one!) and some stunning performances.   It’s not unusual to hear the emergence of the Historically Informed Performance movement described as a direct reaction against the “excesses” of Karajan, and his generation’s, interpretations of the Classical…
  • Karajan 25th Anniversary Special- Music of Ravel, Debussy and Bartok

    Kenneth Woods
    16 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    Today marks the 25th anniversary of the death of Herbert von Karajan- one of the most influential, accomplished, controversial and contradictory musicians who ever lived. Not too long ago, I was asked to provide introductory essays for two volumes the Warner’s news collection of EMI-era Karajan recordings. It was a fascinating challenge, but one I seriously considered not taking on simply because Karajan remains such a divisive figure, both as a person and a musician. In the end, I took the gig. The two sets comprise an enormous amount of very diverse repertoire- it made for…
  • CD Review- Classical CD Reviews on Verklarte Nacht and Brahms Serenade no. 1

    Kenneth Woods
    16 Jul 2014 | 2:26 am
    A new review of the recent Somm CD of Schoenberg’s Verklarte Nacht and Brahms’s Serenade in D major from critic Gavin Dixon at Classical CD Reviews “. But this group, the string trio Ensemble Epomeo with three extra players, instead strives for, and achieves, clarity of line and texture. The textures are appropriately bass heavy, and the two cellos dominate, but every line comes through with exceptional clarity. This gives the piece a new profile, with the complex but now clear counterpoint driving the music and leading the ear through the harmonic web. There is atmosphere…
  • Explore the Score- Arnold Schönberg, Verklärte Nacht

    Kenneth Woods
    9 Jul 2014 | 6:25 am
        The Brahms-Wagner rivalry was largely an affair of the press, whipped up by critics like the Brahmsian Eduard Hanslick and his pro-Wagnerian rivals. Brahms actually professed great admiration for Wagner’s music on many occasions. Nonetheless, there was a time when the two men were perceived as embodying irreconcilable aesthetic approaches. In the end, it was Arnold Schönberg who succeeded in Verklärte Nacht and the works which followed it, in marrying the joint influences of Wagner and Brahms as no one had before.   Brahms’s music- its density, richness and rigour-…
  • Howard Karp

    Kenneth Woods
    7 Jul 2014 | 12:42 pm
      Pianist Howard Karp (photo by Katrin Talbot)   For the last few weeks, I’ve been meaning to write a blog post titled “If you buy only one recording this year, make it this one.” The recording in question is a new six-disc collection of live performances by the American pianist Howard Karp, released in May by Albany Records. Howard Karp died on Monday, June 30, 2014 at the age of 84 after suffering a cardiac arrest. He  was surrounded by his wife Frances and his two sons Parry and Christopher. Although the set was only released last month, I’ve been listening to and…
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    Iron Tongue of Midnight

  • Peter Gelb Wants to Lose His Job

    23 Jul 2014 | 3:38 pm
    He's threatening to lock out the Met's unionized workers on August 1:In letters to the company’s unionized workers, Mr. Gelb, who is seeking to cut pay and benefits, wrote that “if we are not able to reach agreements by July 31 that would enable the Met to operate on an economically sound basis, please plan for the likelihood of a work stoppage beginning Aug. 1.” He added, “I sincerely hope to avoid such an unfortunate event.” Mr. Gelb said in an interview, “If we haven’t reached agreements, the Met really has no option in my opinion but to impose a lockout.”C'mon:…
  • Wagner Here and There

    23 Jul 2014 | 10:53 am
    The 103rd Bayreuth Festival opens this week. Even if you're not going, you can hear plenty of Wagner:The festival radio broadcast schedule is at OperaCast.Over at Parterre Box, hear a compendium of Wagnerian amuse-bouches assembled by a parterrian.
  • A Trip to Texas?

    22 Jul 2014 | 7:24 am
    If only these two productions, 195 miles apart in space, weren't also months apart in time:Opera San Antonio's Salome, with a bunch of role debuts, including Patricia Racette's first staged Salome.  January 8 & 11, 2015.Houston Grand Opera's Die Walkuere, with Christine Goerke, Iain Paterson, Karita Mattila, Simon O'Neill, Jamie Barton, and Ain Anger. April 18 - May 3, 2015.
  • Fantasy Opera Update

    16 Jul 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Three years ago, I wrote a series of postings detailing the operas I would stage if I had all the money in the world. It was, of course, a list of operas I'd like to see. Here's an update on which of those works I've managed to see.Ades, The Tempest. Seen on HD broadcast, heard some excerpts live at SFS (never reviewed the program). I continue to like this opera a lot. People like to pound on the libretto, which I think is quite a bit better than they do. If not for supertitles, would it be so disliked?Birtwistle (The Minotaur, or any opera). I saw Gawain and Yan Tan Tethera in…
  • More on Birtwistle's Birthday

    15 Jul 2014 | 11:39 pm
    Tributes and commentary elsewhere:Thomas May, Memeteria, Birthday Salute to Sir Harrison BirtwistleTom Service, The Guardian, Happy Birthday Sir Harrison Birtwistle! (Five Introductory Pieces)Tom Service, The Guardian, A Guide to Harrison Birtwistle's Music (May, 2012)Ethan Iverson, Do the Math, The Triumph of TimeFiona Maddox, The Guardian, Interview from May, 2014
 
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    Musical Assumptions

  • Sam I Am Eggs

    22 Jul 2014 | 12:18 pm
    I was talking with my father about making deviled eggs with Avocado for the picnic before our Summer Strings concert this evening, and he suggested I could make "Sam I Am" eggs. So I did. I also drew this nifty little sign, and made a few extra eggs to have for lunch with Michael. He liked them a lot, and he suggested that I should put the recipe on my blog.So I did. Here's a close-up shot to click on so that you can see the details.I can't give you exact amounts, but I don't think that exact amounts really matter in a recipe like this.I cooked eggs in a steamer (which makes them easier to…
  • Nicolas Slonimsky on Val Rosing

    22 Jul 2014 | 9:09 am
    [From Perfect Pitch]In concert recitals Rosing could get away with anything as long as he was confident that his accompanist would follow him through all his vagaries. But a real disaster befell him when he undertook the lead role in an Eastman School production of Gounod's Faust. He knew the arias, but the recitatives were beyond his power of retention. He sang in French, and as usual was not sure of the words. For safety's sake he planted scraps of paper with words written on them in the scenery for the garden scene, which had a lot of recitative in it. At the last moment, a misguided…
  • When You Open it to Speak (or Sing) are you Smart?

    21 Jul 2014 | 8:48 am
    Amoeba Music in Los Angeles had a Thomas Quasthoff section. I knew that he had retired from singing a few years ago, so I just bought all of his recordings including "The Jazz Album" (from 2007). Quasthoff's Bach is superb (but I knew that), and so is his German Lieder singing (naturally). I'm pretty discerning when it comes to German diction, but as a native speaker I feel that I have some expertise in American English diction. Quasthoff's American English is excellent. It might even be idiomatic to a fault, incorporating the colloquial pronunciation of a word like "sister" as it would be…
  • Summer Strings Concert Tomorrow Night!

    21 Jul 2014 | 6:27 am
    It's had to believe that we have been doing Summer Strings for ten years. What started as a way to give students a way to play music together in the summer has grown into something that string players around here look forward to all year. This year's concert has a little less in the way of pop music than previous years, and it will open with the first performance ever (a world premiere, if you will) of my "May Day Overture" a piece that I completed on the first of May. All of the other music on the program that I have either written or arranged I have already made available through the IMSLP…
  • Music of Gratitude: Beethoven

    20 Jul 2014 | 8:36 am
    Last night's concert was a wonderful experience. Before we played Beethoven's Sixth Symphony our conductor Kevin Kelly mentioned to the audience how grateful he was to have enjoyed 18 seasons of the Prairie Ensemble in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. The orchestra's response, prompted by Beethoven, was one of collective musical gratitude (felt by everyone in the room) in this Symphony that is really "about" gratitude. I had never thought of the piece that way before, and after last night I will never think of it without feelings of extreme gratitude for being able to make music in this most…
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    On An Overgrown Path

  • Audiences can cope if given the opportunity

    24 Jul 2014 | 12:19 am
    In that photo senior Tibetan Buddhist monk Kenrap-la is introduced to Jonathan Harvey's Body Mandala for the first time. He is listening via my iPod as we approach his monastery at Thiksay at the end of the arduous 800 km drive from Kalka in the foothills of the Himalayas to Ladakh on the border of India and Tibet. When I took the photo we were 15,000 feet above sea level and more than 1000 km from the nearest concert hall, in a region where symphony orchestras are unknown and Western art music is culturally alien. Yet, despite this, Kenrap-la listened engrossed for the whole fifteen minutes…
  • For the Netherlands

    23 Jul 2014 | 4:37 am
    July 23rd is a day of mourning in the Netherlands for the victims of the Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 tragedy. My wife and I were particularly moved by this tragedy as our flight from Delhi to London a few days later was rerouted away from Ukrainian airspace - the photo was taken by me at Shey Tibetan Buddhist monastery in India. As a tribute to the victims of all nationalities I offer a link to a recording of the Dutch composer Lex van Delden's 1981 Musica di Catasto. Lex van Delden (1919-88) knew tragedy himself as a Jew in the Nazi occupied Netherlands. His music was championed by Bernard…
  • Ramadan nights

    23 Jul 2014 | 12:13 am
    Qawwali music at the shrine of the Sufi saint Nizamuddin Auliya in Delhi after sunset last Saturday. My Ramadan nights are being spent at a Buddhist puja in Ladakh, a Sufi ritual in India, the Freiburg Opera Parsifal in Norwich, and, finally, at William Byrd's Mass for Five Voices in the beautiful church of St Peter and St Paul in Salle, Norfolk. At the Salzburg Summer Festival during Ramadan there are performances of Sufi chants by an Egyptian brotherhood, the premiere of a work celebrating the Sufi martyr Mansur al-Hallağ by the Palestinan-Israeli composer Samir Odeh-Tamimi coupled with…
  • How the BBC is distorting the classical music market

    22 Jul 2014 | 12:52 am
    Attention has been drawn by Norman Lebrecht to the poor ticket sales for Freiburg Opera performances of Parsifal and Tannhäuser this week at the Norwich Theatre Royal. In a comment on the story Sunday Times music critic Hugh Canning describes the publicity for the Freiburg Opera residency in Norwich as "woeful", a description that has an element of truth but which needs to be put into perspective. The Norwich Theatre Royal - with which I have absolutely no professional connection - is a registered charity which presents a range of arts, entertainment and education events. In the year 2012/13…
  • Peaks and lamas

    21 Jul 2014 | 5:25 am
    Conch shells sounding from the roof announce the early morning puja at the Tibetan Buddhist Thiksay Monastery in Ladakh. We stayed in Thiksay during our recent visit to Ladakh; the monastery dates from the mid 15th century and, as can be seen from my photo below, is modelled on the Potala Palace in Lasa, Tibet. Thiksay, which is in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, is 180km from the border with Tibet. China's annexation of Tibet gives the link with the Potala Palace, which was the home of the Dalai Lama until he fled from Tibet in 1959, a particular poignancy. Peaks and Lamas is a book…
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    Jason Heath's Double Bass Blog

  • Everything you need to know about tennis elbow for the bass

    Jason Heath
    7 Jul 2014 | 6:50 pm
    The International Society of Bassists (@ISB_World) recently put out a post featuring Randy Kurtz talking about tennis elbow for bassists.  This is something that affects a great number of bassists, and this video is well worth a viewing for a better understanding of the condition. Video Link
  • Bassist Matt Heller named as one of Alberta’s 50 Most Influential People

    Jason Heath
    2 Jul 2014 | 1:16 pm
    It makes me incredibly happy to see double bassist Matt Heller named as one of Alberta’s 50 most influential people!  Matt and I go way back–we did the American Russian Youth Orchestra ad Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival together in the late nineties, and we have kept in touch during his time in Chicago and now Canada as a bassist in the Calgary Philharmonic. Matt is an active writer and has served as president of the Organization of Canadian Symphony Musicians.  He also appeared on a Contrabass Conversations episode several years ago.  He’s a great guy and is a great…
  • Thierry Barbé plays Dvorak Cello Concerto

    Jason Heath
    1 Jul 2014 | 6:50 pm
    Check out this video of bassist Thierry Barbé (my friend that I met serving together on the board of the International Society of Bassists) performing the Dvorak Cello Concerto on bass!
  • Next Level Bassist – a great offering from Ranaan Meyer

    Jason Heath
    1 Jul 2014 | 5:57 pm
    If you aren’t familiar with Ranaan Meyer’s publication Next Level Bassist, you really should check it out. This free quarterly publication delivers a high-quality electronic journal to your inbox four times a year. It’s a thoughtful and useful resource that has thrived for the past several years, and I continue to learn from every issue. Check out Ranaan’s Contrabass Conversations interview if you haven’t before, and if you’re a student or are looking for a chance to grow as a bassist, Ranaan’s Wabass summer program is highly recommended.
  • Things to Know About Your Bass Bridge from Donovan Stokes

    Jason Heath
    30 Jun 2014 | 8:07 pm
    Great article from @notreble from former Contrabass Conversations guest Donovan Stokes: Having a properly set up bridge on your upright is an important factor in the playability, sound and the long-term health of your instrument. Here are some things every upright player should know: The internal, not external, notches you see on the F-holes determine the proper distance of the bridge from the fingerboard. They should correspond, more or less, to the center of each bridge foot. Furthermore the feet should be in a straight line from E side to G side. Bridges without height adjusters won’t…
 
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    Marco Polo New Releases

  • SPOHR, L.: String Quartets (Complete), Vol. 17 - Nos. 10 and 18 (Moscow Philharmonic Concertino String Quartet) (8.225352)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The composition of string quartets ran as a continuous thread throughout Louis Spohr’s life, and he used the Quartet No. 10 in A major as his ‘parade horse’, playing it frequently in the Viennese salons to show off his skills both as a violinist and composer to audiences accustomed to Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Its first violin part matches the bravura display of the Quatuor brillant No. 3, written as Spohr planned to resume life as a touring virtuoso after resigning from his post in charge of the Frankfurt Opera. The Variations, Op. 6 see the soloist covering a wide range…
  • SPOHR, L.: String Quartets (Complete), Vol. 16 - Nos. 23 and 26 (Moscow Philharmonic Concertino String Quartet) (8.225983)

    30 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    For Louis Spohr, virtuoso violinist and composer, the string quartet ran like a thread throughout his life. Strongly influenced by both the Viennese classics and the French violin school, he wrote a series of works that incorporated both of these models as he became one of the most important and esteemed composers of the first part of the nineteenth century. Both of the quartets on this recording reflect these different elements of his music, from the elegant refinement and impressive lyricism of the Quartet No. 23 to the thrilling panache of the technically demanding Quartet No. 26. This is…
  • STRAUSS I, J.: Edition - Vol. 25 (8.225345)

    30 Nov 2013 | 4:00 pm
    Morale was low in Vienna after the suppression of the 1848 revolution, but Johann Strauss the Elder’s celebratory ball in January 1849 provided new waltzes which “were heard to general applause and were excellent”. This final volume of the complete Johann Strauss I edition includes the enigmatic Quadrille Without Title, and the celebration of a hero hailed alongside Radetzky in the Jelačić March. The Exeter Polka and Almack’s Quadrille were an introduction to London society, while the Radetzky Banquet March was left incomplete at the time of the…
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    Naxos New Releases

  • MIHALOVICI, M. / SMITH, W.O. / HAMILTON, I. / MCKAY, G.F.: Clarinet Sonatas (Spece, Gainsford) (9.70211)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Forgotten Gems is an assemblage of four previously unrecorded works whose stimulating and demanding character are uniquely suited to the dynamic energy of the Richard Spece/Read Gainsford duo. Marcel Mihalovici’s Sonata inhabits an exceptionally powerful and sometimes raucous world of rhythmically innovative neoclassicism, while cutting-edge composer William O. Smith, also known as Dave Brubeck’s colleague Bill Smith, is noted for his ground-breaking use of clarinet multiphonics. Truth in expression and honesty characterise Iain Ellis Hamilton’s work, and George Frederick…
  • ALDRIDGE, R.: Parables - An Interfaith Oratorio (Romey) (NTSC) (2.110358)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
  • LOUSSIER, J.: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 and 2 / PADEREWSKI, I.J.: Violin Sonata (Kostecki, Iwicki, Hauer, Polish Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra) (8.573200)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Jacques Loussier achieved immense worldwide popular success combining the music of J.S. Bach and jazz improvisation with his Play Bach Trio. Loussier’s focus has since turned more towards composing, his predilection for fusing jazz and classical elements expressed at its most economical in these two Violin Concertos. Eloquent expressiveness and colourful use of percussion characterise the First Concerto, while the Indian influence in the Second Concerto emerges through violin improvisation and rhythmic counterpoint from the tabla. Like Loussier, Paderewski was a piano virtuoso who…
  • BERLIOZ, H.: Harold en Italie / Le carnaval romain / Benvenuto Cellini: Overture (Berthaud, Lyon National Orchestra, Slatkin) (8.573297)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Drawing on the adventures of Byron’s Childe Harold and the composer’s own Italian experiences as a Prix de Rome winner, Harold en Italie was intended for the great violinist Paganini who, having initially rejected the work, later repented, giving it his highest praise. The brilliant concert overtures Benvenuto Cellini and Le carnaval romain are among Berlioz’s most popular works. Quickly taken up by several celebrated violinists of the time, the elegant Rêverie et Caprice is his only work for solo violin and orchestra. Leonard Slatkin’s Lyon recording of…
  • ACHRON, J.: Violin and Piano Music - Hebrew Melody / Suite No. 1 en style ancien / Stempenyu Suite (M. Ludwig, D'Amato) (8.573240)

    30 Jun 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Joseph Achron was a child prodigy as a violinist, and despite great success as a composer he considered himself a performer for most of his life. His most famous composition is the intense and dramatic Hebrew Melody, but the riches in this programme range from the deeply passionate early Prelude, the spirit of dance in Les Sylphides, the various moods of the Stimmungen and the theatrical Stempenyu, speculated to be the inspiration for Marc Chagall’s famous painting of a fiddler on the roof. Achron’s remarkable music fell into obscurity, but its recent revival includes a recording…
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    The Naxos Blog

  • Scoring ten

    Naxos-FC
    17 Jul 2014 | 9:29 pm
    Most people know about the curse of the ninth, but if you don’t, here’s a quick explanation. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Choral (8.550181) laid down a few benchmarks. Its influence was felt most recently, perhaps, during the dawn of the age of the compact disc. Consideration had to be given to how many minutes of music a standard CD should be able to accommodate. It was decided that the capacity must be long enough to take a complete performance of Beethoven’s last symphony, without spilling over to a second disc. Back to the nineteenth century: Beethoven was already…
  • 1 out of 8: the BBC Proms opening week

    Naxos-FC
    10 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Next Friday, 18 July sees the opening concert of the celebrated BBC Promenade Concerts, the world’s largest music festival. Planning the programmes for the daily schedule of concerts during the 8-week jamboree must be a headache. There will always be those who focus on the lack of this or an imbalance in that, but the remarkable attendance figures suggest that the organisers have got their heads firmly screwed on. Rather than opining about the overall repertoire line-up, we thought we could dip into a few of the concerts taking place during the first week of the festival and see if…
  • Multiplied by the power of one

    Naxos-FC
    4 Jul 2014 | 3:10 am
    There’s no doubting the thrill of hearing a pot-bellied orchestra going for climactic points in a score with all its might and dislodging the dust from concert hall rafters. Yet the other end of the textural spectrum can be equally telling. Mozart reminded us that silence is possibly the most powerful element in music. Equally magical are those moments when the layers in a work slim right down to a single line, instilling fear into anyone in the auditorium who might be thinking of releasing a good cough at that moment. I recall the first time I heard a live performance of Walton‘s…
  • The Magic Fruit

    Naxos-FC
    26 Jun 2014 | 9:00 am
    I expect many of us spend more time in supermarkets nowadays scrutinising the contents of packets of this and tins of that. Never before have we been made more aware of the devil being in the detail, and the fact that we are what we eat. I started to wonder what my choices would be if I had to label pieces of music according to their contribution to auditory health. Any suggestions for a piece that contains ‘bad cholesterol’? How about ‘high on sugar’, ‘a reliable source of protein’ or ‘raises/lowers blood pressure’? I decided a simpler option…
  • My hero. Yours, too?

    Naxos-FC
    19 Jun 2014 | 9:00 am
    Where would we be without our heroes? Well, classical music would certainly be the poorer without the heroic thread that weaves through the catalogue. Works are branded heroic either by their general aura, the mention of the word in the title, or the name of a specific hero on which a piece is built. We would all have our individual list of ‘heroic’ works, if asked to compile one. The following small selection may resonate with your own; or it may throw up something worth getting to know, if you are not already familiar with a piece. With this month marking the 150th anniversary…
 
 
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    I CARE IF YOU LISTEN

  • Flux Quartet Delivers a Reference Recording of Feldman’s String Quartet No. 1

    Bruce A. Russell
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    The FLUX Quartet have masterfully laid claim to the complete string quartets of Morton Feldman, becoming legends of new music along the way. They famously premiered the integral six-hour version of String Quartet No. 2 and later recorded it as part of Mode Records’ excellent Feldman Edition (in 1999 and 2002, respectively). It stood to [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • 5 Questions to Tobias Picker (Composer)

    David Dies
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    On July 20, 2014, the Glimmerglass Festival presented the premiere of a new version of composer Tobias Picker and librettist Gene Scheer’s An American Tragedy, originally commissioned by and premiered at the Metropolitan Opera in 2005. Nine performances in total will be presented until August 9. We asked Picker five questions… You have said that you knew [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • This week: concerts in New York (July 21 – July 27, 2014)

    Sam Reising
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    The Knights The Knights perform music by Gyorgy Ligeti, Bela Bartok, Sufjan Stevens, Ljova, and Igor Stravinsky. Tuesday, July 22 at 7:30 PM Free Historic Naumburg Bandshell, Concert Ground, Central Park, New York, NY ..:: Website SoSI in NYC So Percussion with guests Matmos, Kid Millions, and Brian Chase. Wednesday, July 23 at 6:30 PM Tickets [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • 5 questions to The Westerlies (New Music Brass Quartet)

    Joanne Lam
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Following the release of their debut album “Wish The Children Would Come On Home”, The Westerlies made their way back to the west coast from New York for the summer, and celebrated Canada Day with a performance at the Vancouver International Jazz Festival. We asked 5 questions to The Westerlies. How has geography influenced your music and your musical approach? [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • This week: concerts in New York (July 14 – July 20, 2014)

    Sam Reising
    14 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    SyndaKit | Elliott Sharp SyndaKit is an algorithmic composition, an instruction set for a self-organizing system based on bird flocking, the way RNA molecules combine and reproduce, the lateral transmission of data  in African drum choirs, and the computer game “cellular automata” also known as “artificial life.”  SyndaKit creates organisms that groove in unison, that need [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
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    Artiden

  • The Ultimate Guide to Starting a Group Music Class

    Grace Miles
    13 Jul 2014 | 6:39 am
    Many people ask about starting a business, in particular, how to teach music. In January, I met a girl who was building her business and I thought we’d cheer each other on as buddies, because my first rule to excelling in some area is finding a friend in the same space. I shared my favourite tools and strategies with […]
  • Looking for daily music motivation? Get it here.

    Grace Miles
    25 Jun 2014 | 7:52 am
    A buddy of mine is a Master at meditation. I’ve never seen her do it, but I sensed dedication when she said, at the end of our design coaching session: “I got more than I expected from you, but I wish we met somewhere suitable for meditation.” When it comes to making important decisions, we all have ways […]
  • How to Build Your Support Team

    Grace Miles
    19 Jun 2014 | 1:34 pm
    There’s the idea that musicians– and creative people– are solitary creatures. We practice alone, perform alone, win alone. But really, the best thing musicians can do for themselves is build a strong team of support. You are the average of the five people around you. I suspect that if my friends in high school were […]
  • 3 Non-Sketchy Ways to Gain Students Using Your Music Website

    Grace Miles
    5 Jun 2014 | 2:33 pm
    A good website is powerful– it can attract students, 24/7. Working with design clients, this question always catches me off-guard: How did you learn all this… design? “I learned it myself,” I say. But I didn’t describe the thousands of hours sketching and nudging graphics and training my eye for design. Since many Artiden readers are music teachers, here […]
  • How Many Hours Should You Practice Everyday?

    Grace Miles
    28 May 2014 | 8:32 am
    It might sound counter-intuitive, but I encourage people to practice less and then stop practicing– because it helps. Maybe you’ve tried and gradually faded off practicing your music. Family, friends, things get in the way. I spent 8 hours practicing the way to park a car perfectly (yes, you read that right– I don’t have a […]
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    Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont, pianist

  • The new Beethoven album is out!

    Pierre-Arnaud
    1 Jul 2014 | 3:38 am
    Resonus Classics and Pierre-Arnaud are proud to announce today’s release of the pianist’s second album dedicated to Beethoven! The first Beethoven album finally hits the digital shelves and is available on all major platforms like iTunes, Google Play, AmazonMP3… You can download a CD quality or High Resolution (24bit/96kHz) version from Resonus Classics website . These lossless formats are also available on Linn Records website, Quobuz, highresaudio.com and many others! So head to your favorite online music service and get it now! Originally posted on Pierre-Arnaud…
  • Beethoven – Sonatas op. 27 & 28

    Pierre-Arnaud
    27 Jun 2014 | 11:12 am
    Audio CD | Duration: 62:18 | Released on July 1st, 2014 Pianist Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont releases his first album on Resonus Classics with an album containing three pivotal sonatas by Ludwig van Beethoven – the two Op. 27 sonatas labelled “Quasi una fantasia” in E flat major and C sharp minor (including the “Moonlight” sonata) and the Op. 28 sonata in D major (“Pastoral”). In these three sonatas we see Beethoven stretching and experimenting with both form and texture, and the Paris-born pianist Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont – known for his innovative…
  • Discover now the third episode of If Beethoven Blogged!

    Pierre-Arnaud
    24 Jun 2014 | 4:49 am
    Tuesday today, so time for our third and penultimate episode of the series about Beethoven featuring Pierre-Arnaud, If Beethoven Blogged in collaboration with Opus Osm ! In this episode entitled Twisting forms to find a new language, pianist Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont discusses taking risks to discover new meanings in music and demonstrates “before and after” versions of ways to play Beethoven. Originally posted on Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont, pianist. Get in touch with Pierre-Arnaud on Twitter, Facebook or Google +. Help him and purchase his latest album Introducing Pierre-Arnaud…
  • Episode 2 of “If Beethoven Blogged” published on YouTube!

    Pierre-Arnaud
    17 Jun 2014 | 4:43 am
    Mary Matz, editor of Opus Osm, and Pierre-Arnaud just published the second episode of If Beethoven Blogged entitled There’s always something new to discover. In this episode, Pierre-Arnaud describes in basic terms the complex process of interpreting Beethoven’s works for modern recordings, to help connect today’s listener to music written in an earlier time and for a cruder instrument — the pianoforte, forerunner of today’s modern piano. Don’t miss any episode: check Opus Osm‘s website every Tuesday or follow Pierre-Arnaud on Twitter! Originally posted on…
  • If Beethoven Blogged – Episode 1 now available !

    Pierre-Arnaud
    10 Jun 2014 | 5:15 am
    After a successful launch of the series last week on Opus Osm, Mary Matz and Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont released the first episode of If Beethoven Blogged. This Week Mary and Pierre-Arnaud are talking about the pianist’s project Beethoven Evolutions and his vision of Beethoven. Originally posted on Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont, pianist. Get in touch with Pierre-Arnaud on Twitter, Facebook or Google +. Help him and purchase his latest album Introducing Pierre-Arnaud Dablemont on main online stores. Related posts: A coffee with … Mary Matz This outsider named Beethoven. Milstein / Leinsdorf…
 
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    Classical Commentary: Barry Lenson's Classical Music Blog

  • Coming Soon, Carol Oja’s Explosive New Book Reveals Leonard Bernstein’s Role as Civil Rights Champion

    Barry Lenson
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:10 pm
    A few months ago my wife and I went to hear a lecture given by Prof. Carol J. Oja about her upcoming book, Bernstein Meets Broadway: Collaborative Art in a Time of War. Because the lecture was sponsored by the New York Philharmonic, I expected one more evening of adoration directed at Leonard Bernstein by his still-faithful New York Public.I was unprepared for what I heard from Prof. Oja, who is William Powell Mason Professor at Harvard University.  In her quiet and straightforward presentation, she laid out the astonishing story of Bernstein’s fearless support of African-American and…
  • The Best Way to Listen to Classical Music on Your Computer, Tablet or Smartphone Is Still . . . Classical Archives

    Barry Lenson
    25 Jun 2014 | 9:45 am
    Let me start today’s post with a quick disclaimer about my relationship with Classical Archives. I have subscribed to Classical Archives for about three years. I really like Classical Archives. I have written about it before on this blog. Also, I have been writing articles for the Classical Archives eNewsletter for several months now – it’s an unpaid assignment that I took on because (you guessed it) I really like Classical Archives. But despite all that, I am committed today to writing an objective comparison of different ways to listen to classical music on your computer, tablet, or…
  • Take the Distant Voices Classical Music Trivia Quiz

    Barry Lenson
    9 Jun 2014 | 4:45 am
    I took a lot of liberties with music history when I was writing my new novel Distant Voices. All of the characters are fictional, but I created many of them by combining information about the lives of musical figures who actually lived.Just for fun, I have created a musical trivia quiz for you to enjoy today. You need not have read Distant Voices to enjoy it. So here we go . . . 1) In the opening scene in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, one of the grave robbers turns and talks to a statue that is mounted on a crypt. In what opera does something similar happen? a. Benvenuto Cellinib. Normac.
  • Classical Music Has a Problem with the Roma

    Barry Lenson
    21 May 2014 | 12:20 pm
    I was having a conversation last week with a small group of people who are quite knowledgeable about classical music. For some reason, they started to talk about “gypsies,” which of course is another name for Roma people. The people I was talking with talked about the dishonesty of Roma people, about their purported kidnapping of children, about their presence in major European cities as beggars and pickpockets. The conversation then moved on to other topics.But the hypocrisy stuck in my mind. These people would happily listen to music by Liszt, Brahms, Bartok, Dvorak, Kodaly and other…
  • The Perverse Aesthetics of Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder

    Barry Lenson
    2 May 2014 | 9:53 am
    GUSTAV MAHLERYesterday started out pretty well. I decided to write a post about music that is good to listen to on Mother’s Day. I was happy to think about that topic and I started to make a list of musical selections.Then while I was making my list, I suddenly thought of Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder (“Songs on the Death of Children.”)  That song cycle has to do with motherhood, right? But I felt nauseated – actually physically nauseated - when I remembered it. My reaction surprised me. I have listened to those songs plenty of times in the past. I always thought that the concept…
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    Stars & Catz » Classical Music & Opera Buzz

  • Robert Farnon: Portrait of a Flirt + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    23 Jul 2014 | 2:26 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Opera Stars of Tomorrow Make Strong Impression – www.seenandheard-international.com  Donizetti, Mozart, Opening Acts – Jette Parker Young Artists Summer Performance: Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London, 20.7.2014 (MMB) Donizetti: Act I of La favorite Léonor – Nadezhda Karyazina Inès – Anush Hovhannisyan Fernand – Luis Gomes Balthazar – Jihoon […]
  • Critic’s Notebook: National Youth Orchestra Prepares for Concerts + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    22 Jul 2014 | 1:55 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Gergiev World Orchestra for Peace Prom 4 – classical-iconoclast.blogspot.com In the aftermath of  MH 17, it’s hard to think of any ally of Vladimir Putin as an ambassador for world peace.  On the other hand, because I genuinely believe in freedom of speech, I can’t condemn him for having […]
  • The Golden Age Of Orchestras & Opera Are At An End + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    21 Jul 2014 | 1:26 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Top Israeli conductor joins anti-war protest in Tel Aviv – www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc The conductor Ilan Volkov, music director of the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, will lead an ad hoc ensemble of musicians at an anti-war protest tomorrow in Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square. The protest, organised by the artist Omer Krieger, will […]
  • BBC First Night of the Proms 2014 Elgar The Kingdom + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    20 Jul 2014 | 12:54 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   BBC Proms, Royal Albert Hall, London – www.ft.com An opening night of cool control amid oppressive heat, a second of crowd-pleasing from the China Philharmonic Orchestra Continue Reading On www.ft.com » China Philharmonic Orchestra at the BBC Proms – classical-iconoclast.blogspot.com Hearing the China Philharmonic Orchestra at the Royal Albert […]
  • Ensemble. Whipped Cream + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    19 Jul 2014 | 12:24 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Small Nations – Big Sounds – www.planethugill.com Bartosz WorochSinfonia Cymru, the lively Welsh chamber orchestra, is going international with its forthcoming Small Nations Big Sounds festival in Cardiff in October. The festival is part of the EU’s Emerging Classical Talent in the EU project and involves a partnership with […]
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    The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source

  • VC STORE | Now Stocking ***New*** Pirastro KorfkerRest Violin Shoulder Rest

    admin
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:41 pm
    The ultimate in sound and comfort, the new Pirastro KorfkerRest violin shoulder rest is fully adjustable, feather light and is designed to allow the instrument to sound freely. Shop Now → http://bit.ly/1rmotxB       The post VC STORE | Now Stocking ***New*** Pirastro KorfkerRest Violin Shoulder Rest appeared first on The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source.
  • Japanese Violinist Seiji Okamoto Awarded 1st Prize at Leipzig Bach Competition

    admin
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:35 am
    20 year old Japanese baroque violinist Seiji Okamoto has been awarded 1st prize at the 2014 Johann Sebastian Bach International Music Competition, in Leipzig Germany. A student of the Tokyo University of Arts, Seiji will receive €10,000 (USD $13,500) and a number of important European concert engagements. 2nd prize was awarded to 28 year old Marie Radauer-Plank from Austria – and 3rd prize to 23 year old Niek Baar from the Netherlands. The biennial competition, started in East-Germany in the 1950s to celebrate the works of Johann Sebastian Bach, is open to international pianists,…
  • VC MASTERCLASS | Victoria Chiang, Peabody Institute – ’5 Essential Skills for Ensuring Efficient Practice’ [VIDEO]

    admin
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:11 am
    The Violin Channel recently caught up with violist and respected pedagogue Victoria Chiang, from the Peabody Institute, in Baltimore and the Aspen Music Festival & School - where she discussed the 5 essential skills for ensuring efficient practice. “I think about it a lot in my own playing, and I talk to my students about it quite a bit, and over the years I keep coming back to 5 things,” Ms Chiang has told VC. VICTORIA CHIANG | PEABODY INSTITUTE | ’5 ESSENTIAL SKILLS FOR ENSURING EFFICIENT PRACTICE’ “Today I would like to talk to you about practicing. Practicing…
  • London Symphony Mourns Death of Principal Trumpeter in Motor Accident

    admin
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:18 am
    The London Symphony Orchestra has today announced the tragic passing of their Principal Trumpeter, Rod Franks in a car accident last night, in Nottinghamshire. Mr Franks, 58 served the role of Principal Trumpet with the orchestra for over 25 years – and held Professorships at the Royal Northern College of Music, the Guildhall School of Music and the Royal Academy of Music. He was being driven back home from an Open Golf Championship, by a friend when the car they were travelling in was involved in a serious multi-vehicle accident on the motorway. Our condolences are with Mr…
  • VC GIVEAWAY | Win 1 of 100 Pre-Release D’Addario Kalpan Violin String Sets! 100 Chances to Win!

    admin
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:09 pm
    To help celebrate the upcoming international release of the new D’Addario Kaplan Amo and Vivo Violin String Sets, The Violin Channel in conjunction with D’Addario Orchestral is giving away 100 pre-release sets. Be 1 of the First in the World to Own & Play! | 100 Incredible Chances to Win! Enter Now:  http://on.fb.me/1gtVPFU Ends: August 4th 2014 The post VC GIVEAWAY | Win 1 of 100 Pre-Release D’Addario Kalpan Violin String Sets! 100 Chances to Win! appeared first on The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source.
 
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    Stephen P Brown

  • 30 years ago today…

    stephenpbrown
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:37 am
      The first time I set foot on USA soil was Friday the 13th of July, 1984, just a little more than 6 weeks after my 14th birthday. My life took a crazy wild turn upside-down, inside-out, and both left and right at the same time. I was going to spend 3 … Give me more... →
  • (LTSD): Focus

    stephenpbrown
    12 Jul 2014 | 11:39 am
    Nowadays, thanks to record labels’ marketers, a lot of people think that Mozart’s music is useful primarily to affect mood. I’m saddened by the number of people who will spend the rest of their lives falling asleep whenever they hear the second movement of Mozart’s second flute concerto or something similar. Instead … Give me more... →
  • Reduced to being grateful

    stephenpbrown
    10 Jul 2014 | 9:26 pm
    Originally posted in August 2012.   This quote is truly perceptive! “Aside from purely technical analysis, nothing can be said about music, except when it is bad; when it is good, one can only listen and be grateful.” W.H.Auden What do you think? There are times when this doesn’t just apply … Give me more... →
  • #PsalmQuest 24 – Mirror 4 for harp quartet

    stephenpbrown
    3 Jul 2014 | 6:48 pm
      Meeting people on Twitter can be fun! It can also lead to some mighty challenges. Such as composing a piece of music for four harps. I had no idea what I was getting myself into, but writing this piece took forever (it seems). The end result is a delightful piece … Give me more... →
  • #PsalmQuest 23 – Cerddoriaeth 1 for solo marimba

    stephenpbrown
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:27 pm
    Music is organized sound that expresses an idea or emotion, whether sung with words, or played on a flute, tree, tuba, saucepan, guitar, cello, or marimba, etc. Over the years, several elements of music have been identified that all organized sounds seem to have in common. One of them is … Give me more... →
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