Classical Music

  • Most Topular Stories

  • The Magic Fruit

    The Naxos Blog
    Naxos-FC
    26 Jun 2014 | 9:00 am
    I expect many of us spend more time in supermarkets nowadays scrutinising the contents of packets of this and tins of that. Never before have we been made more aware of the devil being in the detail, and the fact that we are what we eat. I started to wonder what my choices would be if I had to label pieces of music according to their contribution to auditory health. Any suggestions for a piece that contains ‘bad cholesterol’? How about ‘high on sugar’, ‘a reliable source of protein’ or ‘raises/lowers blood pressure’? I decided a simpler option…
  • Max Hole is right, classical music is an elitist club

    On An Overgrown Path
    29 Jul 2014 | 11:52 am
    Universal Music ceo Max Hole has used the launch of the Bristol Proms to once again denounce classical music as "an elitist club". And he is right, classical music is an elitist club, and there is no better example than the Bristol Proms. This new concert series, which is hailed in the Guardian as "revolutionary", is managed and promoted by U-Live in conjunction with the Bristol Old Vic". U-Live is part of an elitist club otherwise known as Universal Music which controls, among other things, more than 50% of the recorded classical music market, and U-Live is simply a vehicle for giving…
  • Composer gives 120,000 Euros to Latvian opera house

    Slipped Disc
    norman lebrecht
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:31 am
    Igor Krutoy, a Russian-Ukrainian composer, has leaped to the aid of a hard-pressed Baltic house. Rejected as a student by the Kirov conservatoire, Krutoy made his living as a songwriter in Moscow, did a course of studies in Saratov and wound up as head of a music conglomerate, Music1.ru. In 2011, he was reported to have broken the sales record for a New York condominium, paying $48 million for a 12th floor unit at the former Plaza Hotel.  
  • Dear God, Another Calamity!

    Adaptistration
    Drew McManus
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Not really, that’s just a headline to suck you in (although my apologies to any group coincidentally experiencing a calamity today) and that’s exactly what happened last week when I published the exact same article on 7/23 and 7/24 albeit different headlines. The article on 7/23 featured a very descriptive headline with a constructive slant, One Simple Key To Getting The Most Out Of Your Artist Agent Retainer, while the article on 7/24 provided no description whatsoever and relied on more of a sensational approach, Are You Making This Critical Mistake? Care to take a guess at…
  • Are You Making This Critical Mistake?

    Adaptistration
    Drew McManus
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    There is a fascinating post by Joe Patti up at Butts In The Seats, which in turn, is examining a post from Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq at MABlogs about ownership of an artist’s booking data; for example, name and contact information for arts org artistic administrators or performing arts center venue managers that are either leads or established contacts. Although the initial topic touched on the touchy issue of proprietary data (spoiler: it belongs to the artist, not the agent), it is an excellent gateway to a topic that comes up like clockwork via my consulting work: “how do I…
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    Classical

  • The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

    Tom Huizenga
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:57 am
    One hundred years after the start of World War I, hear a range of pop and classical music from artists of the era. Some music reflects the war's violence, some gives solace.» E-Mail This
  • War Of Words At Met Opera May Signal Shutdown

    Jeff Lunden
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:34 am
    With labor negotiations growing more strained, a lockout seems likely next week at the Metropolitan Opera. Management says payroll must be trimmed while unions want to curb production costs.» E-Mail This
  • Labor Conflict May Lock Out Met Opera Workers

    Jeff Lunden
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:21 pm
    If no contract deal is reached by July 31, Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers to plan for a work stoppage the next day.» E-Mail This
  • America's Youth Orchestra Hits The Road — This Time, Playing For U.S.

    Anastasia Tsioulcas
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:57 am
    Hear the world premiere of a piece by Samuel Adams — son of composer John Adams — and watch the orchestra's signature encore, from Gershwin's Porgy and Bess.» E-Mail This
  • A Guitar Hero Draws His Own Sketches Of Spain

    NPR Staff
    20 Jul 2014 | 2:05 am
    Milos, the one-named master of classical guitar, says the story of the instrument's 20th-century journey is told in the work of two Spanish composers.» E-Mail This
 
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    Slipped Disc

  • A pop-chart classical hit that falls between two stools

    norman lebrecht
    30 Jul 2014 | 3:42 am
    We were quick to applaud when Nicole Benedetti’s new album broke into the UK pop charts, the first classical violinist to do so in two decades. The content we found less encouraging. Homecoming: A Scottish Fantasy is a blend of Bruch and Robbie Burns. It sounds pretty good. What it fails to do is come down one side or the other in the Scottish independence debate. And that’s a fatal weakness in the concept. Click sinfinimusic.com for more.
  • Composer gives 120,000 Euros to Latvian opera house

    norman lebrecht
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:31 am
    Igor Krutoy, a Russian-Ukrainian composer, has leaped to the aid of a hard-pressed Baltic house. Rejected as a student by the Kirov conservatoire, Krutoy made his living as a songwriter in Moscow, did a course of studies in Saratov and wound up as head of a music conglomerate, Music1.ru. In 2011, he was reported to have broken the sales record for a New York condominium, paying $48 million for a 12th floor unit at the former Plaza Hotel.  
  • Lincoln Center laments a president

    norman lebrecht
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:11 am
    John W. Mazzola, who ran the Center for 15 years effectively as its second president, has died at 88. A lawyer, Mazzola resigned in 1982 after being found to have used company credit cards to pay $18,000 in personal costs. NY Times obit here. Vivid profile here.  
  • Germany’s top competition is stormed by Koreans

    norman lebrecht
    30 Jul 2014 | 1:57 am
    The ARD music competition, Germany’s most prestigious, has been overwhelmed this year with 519 applications, whittled down to 312. The largest number of participants comes from South Korea, followed by Germany, Japan, Russia, France, Spain, USA, China and Poland. The competition kicks off in Munich on September 1. Total prize money is 165,000 Euros, along with priceless exposure on German TV. The ARD’s most celebrated winner is the now-retired baritone, Thomas Quasthoff.  
  • Two music students killed on way to international clarinet conference

    norman lebrecht
    30 Jul 2014 | 1:46 am
    Tragic news from Scott McAllister, professor of composition at Baylor University, Texas: Two beautiful Baylor music students passed away today on the way to the International Clarinet Association conference. Look up in the sky tonight because if Laura Onwudinanti is as bright and inspiring in heaven as she was here with us, you will need your sunglasses. Prayers to the families and Megan and Jake for a speedy recovery. Grim highway report here. A statement from Baylor here.
 
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    Adaptistration

  • Dear God, Another Calamity!

    Drew McManus
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Not really, that’s just a headline to suck you in (although my apologies to any group coincidentally experiencing a calamity today) and that’s exactly what happened last week when I published the exact same article on 7/23 and 7/24 albeit different headlines. The article on 7/23 featured a very descriptive headline with a constructive slant, One Simple Key To Getting The Most Out Of Your Artist Agent Retainer, while the article on 7/24 provided no description whatsoever and relied on more of a sensational approach, Are You Making This Critical Mistake? Care to take a guess at…
  • Tell Me What You Know! Live Chat Patron Support

    Drew McManus
    29 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    I had an interesting conversation with a colleague yesterday asking what I knew about live chat services to field patron inquires as an addition to email, phone, or social media offerings. From a technical perspective, it has never been easier to implement a solution, like LiveChatInc.com, via your website but it is still rare to come across a performing arts org that offers it alongside primary points of contact. Based on my discussions with arts administrators, the challenge isn’t technical so much as labor; having someone knowledgeable enough to field questions who is also available…
  • Glib Gelb’s Garish Gaffe

    Drew McManus
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Over the weekend, the Metropolitan Opera (Met) Orchestra musicians and their employer engaged in a round of he-said, she-said PR exchanges in the wake of the musicians 84 page document examining what they define as administrative failings. Granted, there’s plenty of material there worth exploring but today’s post is going to examine a crucial bit of news via the 7/25/2014 Associated Press (AP) that flew under the radar. Published in the 7/25/2014 edition of FoxBusiness.com, the AP article includes quotes from Met General Manager, Peter Gelb, about the impending lockout and its…
  • Some Historical Perspective On Met Labor Relations

    Drew McManus
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    The 7/23/2014 edition of New York Times published an article by Michael Cooper that reported on the communication from the Metropolitan Opera (Met) to its employees informing them to anticipate that they will be locking out union employees whose contract expires on July 31, 2014. What’s interesting to note in Cooper’s article is reference to the relatively low number of labor dispute related work stoppages in the Met’s history: a lockout in 1980 and a strike in 1969. Let’s take a moment and put that into historical perspective. But before we do, and in case you…
  • Are You Making This Critical Mistake?

    Drew McManus
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    There is a fascinating post by Joe Patti up at Butts In The Seats, which in turn, is examining a post from Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq at MABlogs about ownership of an artist’s booking data; for example, name and contact information for arts org artistic administrators or performing arts center venue managers that are either leads or established contacts. Although the initial topic touched on the touchy issue of proprietary data (spoiler: it belongs to the artist, not the agent), it is an excellent gateway to a topic that comes up like clockwork via my consulting work: “how do I…
 
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    NewMusicBox

  • Sounds Heard—On Shattering, Burning, and Diverting with Passion

    Jordan Borg
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Though Zwilich, Brouwer, and Shatin are only three of many distinguished female composers, they serve as important models of the different ways a successful career as a female composer can look. Each composer has something wildly different to offer to the contemporary music scene with new CD releases.
  • On the Met Opera Lockout

    Daphne Carr
    29 Jul 2014 | 7:18 am
    What lessons can we as fans, musicians, and members of presenting institutions learn from the Metropolitan Opera's situation? Can we prevent this from happening in our home institutions?
  • Tanglewood: Sessions and Lessons on Successful Composition

    Matthew Guerrieri
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:53 am
    Not being exactly what one wants to hear seems like a pretty thin rationale for judging whether a piece of music succeeds or doesn’t.
  • A Feedback Loop of Movement and Sound: Five Questions with Choreographer Cori Marquis

    Molly Sheridan
    25 Jul 2014 | 7:23 am
    This week marks the Disquiet Junto’s 134th composition challenge and the assignment takes things in a fresh direction: score an already-filmed dance piece. The visual movement is complete, but its sound has yet to be crafted in response.
  • Loudness Isn’t What It Used to Be: Southland Ensemble and Robert Ashley

    Isaac Schankler
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:35 am
    The ensemble chose to perform their selection of Ashley’s works continuously without a break, sometimes even simultaneously. Boundaries were blurred—not just between the pieces themselves, but also between music and theater, between audience and performer, between performance and life.
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    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

  • Wagnerism alert: Penny Dreadful

    Alex Ross
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:45 pm
    My thoughtful husband alerted me to the fact that on a recent episode of the Victorian-Gothic series Penny Dreadful the Wild West character played by Josh Hartnett is so overcome by the strains of Tristan und Isolde, not to mention several glasses of absinthe, that he is inspired to begin making out with none other than Dorian Gray (portrayed by Reeve Carney, previously a singing Spider-Man). "I'd ask if you had heard of Wagner," Gray asks, "but you'd pretend you hadn't." Opera Fresh has more coverage of the show's saucy operatic goings-on.
  • Finding Major Kramers

    Alex Ross
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:45 am
    Longtime readers of this blog may recall sporadic posts on the subject of encounters between Richard Strauss and American soldiers in the years of the Allied occupation of Germany. One time I pleaded for information about Major John Kramers, who is mentioned in Strauss's diary. As I report in this New Yorker blog post, I finally know more about him: Dr. Carl Ellenberger, of Mount Gretna PA, interviewed Kramers some years ago about his meeting with Strauss, and in 2012 reported his findings on the blog of the chamber-music series Gretna Music. It's the bitterwseet ending to a…
  • For Elaine Stritch

    Alex Ross
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:28 pm
    The seemingly indestructible diva has died at the age of eighty-nine. Sarah Larson remembers her on the New Yorker website. Stritch's immortal versions of "The Ladies Who Lunch" have been widely shared, so I thought I'd feature this clip from her final run of Café Carlyle shows, in which she singles out one of her most ardent fans. (Levine famously went to see Elaine Stritch at Liberty fourteen times.) The recent documentary Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me captures her splendidly.
  • Recent work

    Alex Ross
    6 Jul 2014 | 11:24 am
    Shattered Passage. The New Yorker, July 7, 2014. The Met's Klinghoffer Problem. New Yorker website, June 25, 2014. Blockbuster. The New Yorker, June 23, 2014.
  • Midsummer hiatus

    Alex Ross
    9 Jun 2014 | 8:19 pm
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    Sequenza21/

  • Vijay Iyer–The Most Happy Fellow

    Jerry Bowles
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:42 am
    Vijay Iyer and the Brentano Quartet in a live performance of sections from Mutations at Greene Space Over the past two decades, Vijay Iyer has recorded some 18 albums of bold, genre-defying and original music that navigates the fine line between composition and improvisation, between jazz and New Music.  Although his restless musical imagination roams easily through both Carter and Monk territory, unearthing insights that evolve and morph over time, the gestures have largely been identifiable as jazz.   His new and first ECM recording—Mutations—unveils more of the composer side of the…
  • FCM on Monday

    Christian Carey
    20 Jul 2014 | 10:21 am
    On Monday, July 21st at 8 PM, the last concert of Tanglewood’s 2014 Festival of Contemporary Music is a well-stocked program of orchestral works. The centerpiece is Roger Sessions’s Concerto for Orchestra, a work commissioned by the BSO thirty years ago. Steven Mackey’s violin concerto Beautiful Passing will feature as soloist Sarah Silver, one of Tanglewood’s New Fromm Players. Music by John Adams has not in recent memory frequently been featured on FCM programs, but this year his Slonimsky’s Earbox makes an appearance. The sole work by a younger composer, The Sound of Stillness by…
  • The Importance of the New

    George Grella
    3 Jul 2014 | 9:38 am
    Marc Day and Patrick Fennig in “Brother Brother” In June I sat on a panel organized by Opera Cabal, in their visit to the Kitchen to produce Georg Haas’ Atthis, with two other critics, John Rockwell and Zachary Woolfe. While the audience was sparse, they were generally attentive and the talk, which began with the question of whether or not we missed City Opera, was varied and interesting. I was surprised, though, by how much we ended up talking about the Metropolitan Opera, and how Rockwell and Woolfe’s critical thinking is so involved in the context of not only what…
  • 2014 Ojai Music Festival – The Classical Style

    Paul Muller
    15 Jun 2014 | 2:07 pm
    The 2014 Ojai Music Festival opened on Thursday June 12 to begin 4 days packed with informative talks, movie screenings, parties and concerts. The Festival’s Music Director this year is Jeremy Denk and the resident musical groups included The Knights orchestral collective and the Brooklyn Rider string quartet. Friday night’s concert was built around an examination of the Classical period and featured a Haydn string quartet as well as the world premiere of a new opera – “The Classical Style” – by Jeremy Denk and Steven Stucky that was commissioned by the festival…
  • Dogstar 10: Experimental Music Concert Series in Los Angeles

    Paul Muller
    13 Jun 2014 | 11:32 am
    The annual Dogstar Orchestra concert series of experimental music has been going in various locations in and around Los Angeles since May 30. The venue on June 10 was the Wulf, a converted industrial loft space on Santa Fe street downtown, and a good-sized crowd settled in for an evening of spoken and electronic works. The concert was curated by Sara Roberts and Clay Chaplin. The concert opened with Black & White Oratorio by Robert Lax. A chorus of 15 voices and three soloists performed this piece which consists of groups of words for color that are spoken in various patterns and…
 
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    Classical Performance Podcast

  • The Calder Quartet Plays Haydn

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Calder Quartet plays Haydn in WGBH’s Studio One *** Franz Joseph Haydn: String Quartet in G Major, Op. 76, No. I Benjamin Jacobson and Andrew Bulbrook, violins; Jonathan Moerschel, viola; Eric Byers, cello +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on February 22, 2005 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts (photo of Calder Quartet by Autumn de Wilde)
  • Guitarist Eliot Fisk

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    21 Jun 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Turina - Fantasia Sevillanas Ponce - Porti mi Corazon Villa Lobos - Prelude No. 2 Eliot Fisk, guitar © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org (photo of Eliot Fisk by Keitaro Yoshioka)
  • Strauss's Piano Quartet

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    2 Jun 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Musicians from the Rockport Chamber Music Festival play music by Richard Strauss, in WCRB's Fraser Performance Studio *** Richard Strauss: Piano Quartet in C minor, Op.13 David Deveau, piano; Irina Muresanu, violin; Yinzi Kong, viola; Emmanuel Feldman, cello +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on June 4, 2008 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org (portrait of Richard Strauss by Max Liebermann, via Wikimedia Commons)
  • Sean Chen Plays Scriabin

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    18 May 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Sean Chen plays Alexander Scriabin’s Piano Sonata No. 5, in the Fraser Performance Studio *** Alexander Scriabin: Piano Sonata No. 5 Sean Chen, piano +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on April 26, 2013 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org
  • Chiara Plays Haydn

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    7 May 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Chiara String Quartet plays Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 20 No. 2 in C major, in the Fraser Performance Studio *** Franz Joseph Haydn: String Quartet Op. 20 No. 2 in C major Chiara String Quartet: Rebecca Fischer, violin; Hyeyung Julie Yoon, violin; Jonah Sirota, viola; Gregory Beaver, cello +++ Recorded at WGBH’s Fraser Performance Studio on October 23, 2013 © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts e-mail: classical@wgbh.org (photo of Chiara Quartet by Roger Ressmeyer)
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    PlaybillArts.com

  • A Great Journey: Roy Kaiser's 35 Years With Pennsylvania Ballet

    27 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    "I was 21 years old when I came to Philadelphia," says Roy Kaiser, Artistic Director of Pennsylvania Ballet. "I came here to see what was going on, because I had seen the Company perform, and there was something about it that really resonated."
  • Your Concerts in the Parks

    27 Jul 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Tens of thousands flock together each year to enjoy the New York Philharmonic perform in New York City parks — with all listeners bringing their own bespoke traditions.
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    JDCMB

  • Barenboim: a Chopin recital

    26 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    ...And while I continued to hunt for Barenboim playing Schubert, after I found the two-pianos trailer with Argerich, I then found him in a sensational Chopin recital from Warsaw in Chopin year, 2010.Listen to the way Barenboim seems to orchestrate at the piano; the range of colour he can draw from the instrument, as if controlling woodwinds and string sections; the way he builds a sense of narrative and allows absolute logic to meld with on-stage spontaneity - e.g. in the "Heroic" Polonaise and the Minute Waltz. And the sheer scruff-of-the-neck way that his musicianship can grab you and…
  • How Arab and Jewish musicians have been united in Nazareth

    26 Jul 2014 | 1:52 am
    Fantastic article in The Guardian by Maya Jaggi about a project that seems to offer a vision of hope even at a time like this. Please read. http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jul/25/polyphony-conservatory-nazareth-arab-jewish-orchestra
  • Friday historical-to-be: Barenboim and Argerich in duo

    25 Jul 2014 | 8:30 am
    I was hunting for film of Daniel Barenboim playing Schubert, when I came across this trailer for a new release featuring him and Martha Argerich playing works for piano duet and two pianos. Schubert, Mozart and The Rite of Spring, no less, recorded live at the Philharmonie in Berlin. This isn't historical yet, but it's a history-worthy occasion.Barenboim, meanwhile, has written the only wise and constructive article I've yet read about the horrifying conflagration in Gaza. Here it is. Please read.
  • More good news! This time, music education

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    It's in short supply out there in the wider world, but in the UK's musical sphere, hot on the heels of Judith Weir's official appointment up top comes more good news. Protect Music Education says that their efforts have secured a £18m increase in funding for the country's "music hubs" for 2015/16, totalling£75m. Led by the Incorporated Society of Musicians, 134 musical organisations have been involved in Protect Music Education and their tireless campaigning has borne fruit.And now, hot on the heels of that news, comes a further triumph: the government has backed down on its ghastly plan to…
  • Great news for two wonderful composers, who happen to be women

    22 Jul 2014 | 12:25 am
    As of this morning, Judith Weir is officially Master of the Queen's Music. She is off to Buckingham Palace today for an audience with HM.She is also launching a blog, which you can follow from her website.Here's Tom Service's interview with her about what she plans to do with the post. Meanwhile, here is my interview from today's Independent with another marvellous British composer: the one and only Errollyn Wallen. Her new opera Anon is a very contemporary adaptation of Manon...and was partly inspired by her own experience of nearly getting murdered when travelling around Europe in her…
 
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    Ionarts

  • 'Carmen' at Wolf Trap

    Charles T. Downey
    29 Jul 2014 | 6:41 am
    Wolf Trap Opera's important work is in the intimate indoor venue of the Barns, like Handel's Giulio Cesare in Egitto last month. The company, a training ground for young singers, also usually gives at least one performance in the Filene Center, a cavernous outdoor venue that appeals for some reasons -- the feel of summer, lawn seating, a large audience -- but is annoying for others, including the
  • C.P.E. Bach on Capitol Hill

    Charles T. Downey
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    Charles T. Downey, Sampling of C.P.E. Bach’s music at Capitol Hill Chamber Music Festival Washington Post, July 28, 2014 This year’s installment of the Capitol Hill Chamber Music Festival opened with another observation of the tricentennial year of the birth of C.P.E. Bach. On Saturday night at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, flutist Jeffrey Cohan, violinist Marlisa del Cid Woods and harpsichordist
  • Perchance to Stream: Summer Opera Edition

    Charles T. Downey
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:23 am
    Here is your regular Sunday selection of links to online audio and online video from the week gone by. After clicking to an audio or video stream, press the "Play" button to start the broadcast. Some of these streams become unavailable after a few days. From the Festival d'Aix-en-Provence, a performance of Mozart's Magic Flute, performed by the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra under conductor Pablo
  • Dip Your Ears, No. 173 (The Image of Melancholy)

    jfl
    26 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Anthony Holborne, John Dowland, et al. The Image of Melancholy Bjarte Eike / Barokksolistene BIS Creaking and Whispering Modern and ancient, creaking and whispering, haunting and pleading, Irish, oriental, occidental and accidental: The atmospheric, contemplative album from Bjarte Eike and the Barokksolistene combines early music (Holborne, Dowland, Byrd, Buxtehude, Biber) with
  • BSO and Beethoven

    Charles T. Downey
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    Pianist Andrew StaupeAfter hearing one of the National Symphony Orchestra's concerts at Wolf Trap, it was only fair to take in one of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's summer concerts, on Thursday night. In the comfortable air conditioning of the Music Center at Strathmore, the only sign of a traditional summer concert was the ensemble's white jackets, a nice touch that went well with the lack
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    The Rambler

  • Andriessen’s De Staat coming to Peckham

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:58 am
    Too much work, school holidays, home building work going on, don’t think I’m going to get time to do a proper Secret Music for August. But it would be remiss of me if I didn’t draw your attention at least to the return of the Multi-Story Orchestra to Peckham Car Park on 7 and 8 … Continue reading →
  • Digital classicism

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:37 am
    Theory (no doubt not original): 1. We have entered a new classical era, in which the pervasive use and influence of metrics, best practices, interoperability, regulation and so on (consequences of our particular technological-economic-legal moment) have defined standards of formal “perfection” to which practitioners currently find themselves beholden. I’m thinking particularly in terms of architecture … Continue reading →
  • Contemporary Notation Project: Michael Baldwin

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:06 am
    It gives me great pleasure to welcome Michael Baldwin as the Rambler’s first ever guest poster. Michael is an American artist currently living in Huddersfield, who works around the medium of sound, specifically in contemporary concert-hall music performance contexts. In his words, he is ‘primarily invested in examining the margins of musical performance practice through … Continue reading →
  • Bryn Harrison: Vessels (Recent releases from another timbre, part 3)

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    11 Jul 2014 | 4:26 am
    (This post is part of a series looking at recent releases by Sheffield’s another timbre label. See here for the introduction.) Bryn Harrison | Vessels | Philip Thomas, piano | another timbre (at69) Of the current batch of another timbre CDs that I’m reviewing, this one seems the most problematic. I’ve raved about Bryn Harrison’s music … Continue reading →
  • Laurence Crane: Chamber Works 1992–2009 (Recent releases from another timbre, part 2)

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    (This post is part of a series looking at recent releases by Sheffield’s another timbre label. See here for the introduction.) Laurence Crane | Chamber Works 1992–2009 | Apartment House | another timbre (at74x2) For newcomers to the world of experimental music – hovering happily between composition and improvisation, determinism and experiment – to which another timbre dedicates itself, this is … Continue reading →
 
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    Opera Today

  • Adriana Lecouvreur Opera Holland Park

    anne.ozorio@ntlworld.com
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:45 am
    Twelve years after Opera Holland Park's first production of Francesco Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur, the opera made a welcome return.
  • Back to the Beginnings: Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria at Iford Opera.

    anne.ozorio@ntlworld.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 7:05 am
    The Italianate cloister setting at Iford chimes neatly with Monteverdi’s penultimate opera The Return of Ulysses, as the setting cannot but bring to mind those early days of the musical genre. The world of commercial public opera had only just dawned with the opening of the Teatro San Cassiano in Venice in 1637 and for the first time opera became open to all who could afford a ticket, rather than beholden to the patronage of generous princes. Monteverdi took full advantage of the new stage and at the age of 73 brought all his experience of more than 30 years of opera-writing since his…
  • Schoenberg : Moses und Aron, Welsh National Opera, London

    anne.ozorio@ntlworld.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:15 am
    Once again, we find ourselves thanking an unrepresentable being for Welsh National Opera’s commitment to its mission. It is a sad state of affairs when a season that includes both Boulevard Solitude and Moses und Aron is considered exceptional, but it is - and is all the more so when one contrasts such seriousness of purpose with the endless revivals of La traviata which, Die Frau ohne Schatten notwithstanding, seem to occupy so much of the Royal Opera’s effort. That said, if the Royal Opera has not undertaken what would be only its second ever staging of Schoenberg’s masterpiece - the…
  • Rossini is Alive and Well and Living in Iowa

    anne.ozorio@ntlworld.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 12:32 am
    If you don’t have the means to get to the Rossini festival in Pesaro, you would do just as well to come to Indianola, Iowa, where Des Moines Metro Opera festival has devised a heady production of Le Comte Ory that is as long on belly laughs as it is on musical fireworks.
  • Gergiev : Janáček Glagolitic Mass, BBC Proms

    anne.ozorio@ntlworld.com
    26 Jul 2014 | 2:15 pm
    Composed during just a few weeks of the summer of 1926, Janáček’s Slavonic-text Glagolitic Mass was first performed in Brno in December 1927. During the rehearsals for the premiere - just 3 for the orchestra and one 3-hour rehearsal for the whole ensemble - the composer made many changes, and such alterations continued so that by the time of the only other performance during Janáček’s lifetime, in Prague in April 1928, many of the instrumental (especially brass) lines had been doubled, complex rhythmic patterns had been ‘ironed-out’ (the Kyrie was originally in 5/4 time), a…
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    aworks :: "new" american classical music

  • Electrikaleidoscope (1972). George Rochbert #listeninglog #rock #nostalgia

    rgable
    14 Jul 2014 | 8:12 pm
    George Rochberg's Electrikaleidoscope, with its amplified ensemble of flute, clarinet, cello, piano and electronic piano, is an artifact of the Seventies. From a Village Voice review: Though this piece has its amusing moments and seems tongue-in-cheek for a while, it leaves one with the impression that a serious statement has been made. Throughout the work the composer never stands above the traditions he is referring to, taking potshots at them, but relates to each one on a sincere level, employing his own astute craftsmanship to make his own kind of Beethoven and his own kind of rock……
  • Henry Jacobs. Sonata for Loudspeaker (1953-54) #listeninglog #kpfa

    rgable
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:28 pm
    Henry Jacobs is a name new to me. He is an American sound artist who presented taped recordings at KPFA in Berkeley in the 1950s. As of 2005, he was living somewhere on the coast of Northern California. So far, the music is only of historical interest. listening log: Henry Jacobs. Sonata for Loudspeaker. Radio Programm no.1: Henry Jacobs' Music and Folklore Henry Jacobs. Loop 2-Channel Rhythms. Radio Programm no.1: Henry Jacobs' Music and Folklore James P. Johnson. Felicity Rag. William Albright - Ragtime James P. Johnson. Eccentricity-Syncopated Waltz. William Albright - Ragtime James P.
  • aworks listening log :: july 12, 2014 #glass #lively #good-spirited

    rgable
    12 Jul 2014 | 9:08 am
    Philip Glass. Metamorphosis. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Mad Rush. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Piece in the Shape of a Square. Clair Chase - Density Judith Shatin. View from Mt. Nebo. Eva Gruesser, Andre Emelianoff - Dreamtigers Dan Trueman. Five (and-a-half) Gardens Elliott Carter. Holiday Overture. Kenneth Schermerhorn: Nashville Symphony Orchestra - Carter: Piano Concerto, Symphony #1, Holiday Overture Lou Harrison. Music for Violin with Various Instruments. Oakland Youth Orchestra, Robert Hughes, Thomas Halpin Lou Harrison. Two…
  • aworks listening log :: july 12, 2014 #glass #lively #good-spirited

    rgable
    12 Jul 2014 | 9:07 am
    Philip Glass. Metamorphosis. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Mad Rush. Jeroen Van Veen - Glass: Solo Piano Music Philip Glass. Piece in the Shape of a Square. Clair Chase - Density Judith Shatin. View from Mt. Nebo. Eva Gruesser, Andre Emelianoff - Dreamtigers Dan Trueman. Five (and-a-half) Gardens Elliott Carter. Holiday Overture. Kenneth Schermerhorn: Nashville Symphony Orchestra - Carter: Piano Concerto, Symphony #1, Holiday Overture Lou Harrison. Music for Violin with Various Instruments. Oakland Youth Orchestra, Robert Hughes, Thomas Halpin Lou Harrison. Two…
  • aworks favorites :: john cage

    rgable
    4 Jul 2014 | 7:39 pm
    Four2 (1990) Latvian Radio Choir - Mythes Étoilés Three Dances (1945) Xenia Pestova - Works for Two Keyboards - 2 The Unavailable Memory of (1944) Alexei Lubimov - As It Is Philipp Vandré - Complete Short Works for Prepared Piano A Room (1943) Giancarlo Simonacci - Cage: Complete Music for Prepared Piano Imaginary Landscape No. 1 (1939) Forbidden Planets (Music From The Pioneers Of Electronic Sound) Wikipedia: Four Imaginary Landscape John Cage John Cage compositions Alexei Lubimov A Room The Unavailable Memory of  YouTube:  A Room - Giancarlo Simonacci The Unavailable Memory of…
 
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    Sounds & Fury

  • For The Record - Online Forum Thread Re, Bayreuther Festspiele

    A.C. Douglas
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:48 am
    As in the past, we post this summary of a discussion thread from the venerable opera forum (listserve) Opera-L simply for the purpose of making...
  • Operas Grounded In Real, Historical Events

    A.C. Douglas
    18 Jun 2014 | 9:55 am
    An extensive thread of posts concerning the cancellation of the Met's HD Live showings of the Met's production of John Adams's opera The Death of...
  • Heather Mac Donald On Dvorák’s Rusalka And Eurotrash

    A.C. Douglas
    31 May 2014 | 12:56 am
    Here's another brilliant bit of opera commentary from the pen of the almost always on-target Heather Mac Donald. This about the jaded, perverted way of...
  • City On Fire!

    A.C. Douglas
    20 May 2014 | 11:18 am
    [NOTE: This entry has been updated (2) as of 3:29 PM Eastern on 23 May. See below.] Although there was relatively little comment on the...
  • The Right Way To Do Operatic Konzept Regietheater

    A.C. Douglas
    11 Apr 2014 | 2:31 pm
    Here's the honest way to do operatic Konzept Regietheater while saving it harmless from being, ipso facto, unmitigated Eurotrash. “Life is a bitter, painful fight”...
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    parterre box

  • And another thing

    La Cieca
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:43 am
    UPDATE: A new communication from AGMA, after the jump. PREVIOUSLY: The MET Orchestra musicians who, we are assured, “love the Metropolitan Opera and want it to succeed” have revised their PPT deck to identify what they claim is an additional $1.2 million in cost savings to the company to be accomplished without taking any dings to their own personal paychecks. Notable among their cost-saving ideas: slashing the new production budget by 50% (i.e., allowing for five productions per season at the arbitrary figure of $2.2 million per), reducing rehearsal time, and blacking out the Met…
  • Hosenschlange

    La Cieca
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:54 pm
    “Die langen schwarzen Haare nach hinten gegelt, in schwarzer Hose und Hemd und Schlangenmustermantel zeigt er bodygebuildete Muskeln, die gut und gerne darauf schließen lassen, dass er auch Ähnliches in der Hose haben könnte.” [Salzburger Nachrichten]
  • Rough trade and regie

    La Cieca
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:53 pm
    Meet Tobias Kratzer (left) who is scheduled to direct Tannhäuser for Bayreuth in 2019. Die Welt has details on Festspiele through 2020. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfjDbBhAHwE
  • Tomb raider

    DeCaffarrelli
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:10 pm
    Despite the continued popularity of Der Freischütz in German-speaking countries, are the magical mature operas of Carl Maria von Weber otherwise really so problematic, their libretti so unwieldy to explain their continued absence from the world’s stages? The enthusiastic ovations Sunday afternoon that greeted the conclusion of the second performance of the first US staging of Euryanthe in nearly a century at Bard Summerscape suggested that perhaps a reconsideration of Weber may be underway.   Weber’s 1823 grosse heroisch-romantische oper arrived at the Metropolitan during its fifth…
  • Calpesta il mio cadavere!

    La Cieca
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    This week, Our Own Jungfer Marianne Leizmetzerin turns her vigilant ears to the recent past to take in a performance of Il trovatore featuring Anna Netrebko and Plácido Domingo. Giuseppe Verdi: Il trovatore Berliner Staatsoper im Schillertheater Daniel Barenboim, conductor 11 December 2013 In-house recording Manrico – Gaston Rivero Leonora – Anna Netrebko Il conte di Luna – Plácido Domingo Azucena – Marina Prudenskaya Ferrando – Adrian Sâmpetrean Ines – Anna Lapkovskaja Ruiz – Florian Hoffmann Photo: Bettina Straub
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    The Wagnerian

  • As Peter Gelb Seems To Threaten To Cancel 2014-15 Season. Orchestra Responds

    24 Jul 2014 | 5:41 pm
    Whose Head Is Being Called For?Unions respond to Gelbs's letter threatening a "lockout. Full response below. Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb Threatens Lockout, Cancellation of the 2014/2015 Opera Season; Orchestra Musicians Denounce Gelb’s Long-Planned Lockout as a “Cynical strategy to cover up his failed management and lack of artistic vision" New York, NY–Wednesday, July 23, 2014–Local 802, American Federation of Musicians, and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra musicians are dismayed that Peter Gelb has pursued a cynical strategy calculated to result in a lockout of his…
  • Where To Listen To Bayreuth 2014 - Free

    24 Jul 2014 | 5:03 pm
    Yes, its that time of year again. As always there are multiple places to listen to the Bayreuth festival live on the net but alas, should you not have any German they can be difficult to traverse. So, with that in mind we list the live performances available to listen to below. Clicking a link will take you directly to the player which should then allow you to listen to the performance - on the date specified.Note: Clicking the link pay lead to a "popup". If so, you may need to temporarily disable any popup blocker you use for these links. July 25 - TANNHAUSER. Starts 14.00 GMT. Click Here To…
  • OU Offers Free Undergraduate Course

    22 Jul 2014 | 2:33 pm
    While it may seem a little off topic,  there are certainly things here of interest to those with an interest  in Wagner. We recently discovered that the Open University offers a number of distance learning course on-line and for free.  While nodoubt intended to offer "tasters" to their full graduate and undergraduate course many of the modules themselves - for that is what they appear to be - would seem to offer something of interest for more than a few people. We have gone through the list available under "Arts and History" and have selected a few we thought general readers…
  • Wagner Festival - Norfolk

    9 Jul 2014 | 10:06 am
    Epic Operas Come To Norfolk as Dynamic Company Makes Theatre Royal Debut THEATER FREIBURGThe scale, dynamic vision and sheer grandeur of two of Wagner’s epic works are set to provide a summer treat in rural Norfolk as one of Europe’s most highly-regarded opera companies leave their German base for some major UK dates.Theater Freiburg will swap the German city where they have been presenting opera for over 100 years for a temporary summer home at Norwich Theatre Royal to present both Parsifal and Tannhäuser.Peter Wilson, chief executive of Norwich Theatre Royal, said: “I am absolutely…
  • Joachim Köhler & Why Wagner Did Not Cause The Holocaust.

    29 Jun 2014 | 7:49 pm
    "Wagner always considered himself a spiritual revolutionary whose concern was the liberation of human beings, including the Jews, from their so-called 'curse'. Joachim Köhler. The Wagner JournalWhile there is much of interest in the July issue of the Wagner Journal, perhaps Joachim Köhler's reversal on the centrality of Wagner's antisemitism in his work, his influence on the the Third Reich and the persecution of the Jews; is one of the most interesting, extraordinary and "brave" "turn-a-rounds" in Wagner research. But first a little background:Köhler first came to…
 
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    Kenneth Woods- conductor

  • Karajan 25th Anniversary Perspectives part 2- Music of Mozart, Brahms, Strauss, Strauss and Wagner

    Kenneth Woods
    18 Jul 2014 | 3:15 am
    In part 2 of my look back at the work of the still-controversial Herbert von Karajan, who died 25 years ago this week, I share an essay from Warner Classic’s new box set of music by Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, J and R Strauss and Wagner recorded for EMI. A fascinating collection- some surprises, one complete disaster (guess which one!) and some stunning performances.   It’s not unusual to hear the emergence of the Historically Informed Performance movement described as a direct reaction against the “excesses” of Karajan, and his generation’s, interpretations of the Classical…
  • Karajan 25th Anniversary Special- Music of Ravel, Debussy and Bartok

    Kenneth Woods
    16 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    Today marks the 25th anniversary of the death of Herbert von Karajan- one of the most influential, accomplished, controversial and contradictory musicians who ever lived. Not too long ago, I was asked to provide introductory essays for two volumes the Warner’s news collection of EMI-era Karajan recordings. It was a fascinating challenge, but one I seriously considered not taking on simply because Karajan remains such a divisive figure, both as a person and a musician. In the end, I took the gig. The two sets comprise an enormous amount of very diverse repertoire- it made for…
  • CD Review- Classical CD Reviews on Verklarte Nacht and Brahms Serenade no. 1

    Kenneth Woods
    16 Jul 2014 | 2:26 am
    A new review of the recent Somm CD of Schoenberg’s Verklarte Nacht and Brahms’s Serenade in D major from critic Gavin Dixon at Classical CD Reviews “. But this group, the string trio Ensemble Epomeo with three extra players, instead strives for, and achieves, clarity of line and texture. The textures are appropriately bass heavy, and the two cellos dominate, but every line comes through with exceptional clarity. This gives the piece a new profile, with the complex but now clear counterpoint driving the music and leading the ear through the harmonic web. There is atmosphere…
  • Explore the Score- Arnold Schönberg, Verklärte Nacht

    Kenneth Woods
    9 Jul 2014 | 6:25 am
        The Brahms-Wagner rivalry was largely an affair of the press, whipped up by critics like the Brahmsian Eduard Hanslick and his pro-Wagnerian rivals. Brahms actually professed great admiration for Wagner’s music on many occasions. Nonetheless, there was a time when the two men were perceived as embodying irreconcilable aesthetic approaches. In the end, it was Arnold Schönberg who succeeded in Verklärte Nacht and the works which followed it, in marrying the joint influences of Wagner and Brahms as no one had before.   Brahms’s music- its density, richness and rigour-…
  • Howard Karp

    Kenneth Woods
    7 Jul 2014 | 12:42 pm
      Pianist Howard Karp (photo by Katrin Talbot)   For the last few weeks, I’ve been meaning to write a blog post titled “If you buy only one recording this year, make it this one.” The recording in question is a new six-disc collection of live performances by the American pianist Howard Karp, released in May by Albany Records. Howard Karp died on Monday, June 30, 2014 at the age of 84 after suffering a cardiac arrest. He  was surrounded by his wife Frances and his two sons Parry and Christopher. Although the set was only released last month, I’ve been listening to and…
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    Iron Tongue of Midnight

  • I'm Thrilled, Thrilled, I Tell You.

    29 Jul 2014 | 2:15 pm
    The Met sends me a begging letter the week that they're going to lock out the unionized employees:No donations this week, thank you. And conductor Ron Spigelman has a few words to say about the Met's leadership.
  • Ten Questions for the New Esterházy Quartet

    28 Jul 2014 | 3:01 pm
    Anthony Martin of the New Esterházy Quartet (Lisa Weiss and Kati Kyme, violins; Anthony Martin, viola; William Skeen, cello) was kind enough to talk to me about the quartet's recent and upcoming projects and performances. It's especially timely because they're playing three different programs this week at Berkeley's Hillside Club, all well worth seeing. Concert details are at the end of this post.1. What makes the NEQ different from other string quartets?We play on period instruments, with the gut strings characteristic of all string instruments until a hundred years ago, and the lighter…
  • Carlo Bergonzi

    26 Jul 2014 | 3:46 pm
    The great Italian tenor Carlo Bergonzi has died, age 90. You can make a case that he was the greatest of postwar Italian tenors, for the elegance of his line, the beautiful sound, and the scrupulous musicianship. He wasn't the loudest (probably Del Monaco) or the flashiest (Corelli, I guess), but he was a great Verdian and superb in Puccini and bel canto.He hardly sang in SF, appearing only in an otherwise undistinguished Forza in 1969, in a better-cast Ballo in 1985 (with Neblett and Cossotto), and in a 1986 recital. He sang more than 300 performances at the Met, which was…
  • London Photos

    24 Jul 2014 | 2:22 pm
    Because I am a crazy person, I took between 900 and 1,000 photos during my two weeks in London. They're now (mostly) posted at Flickr, arranged into albums by expedition or subject. The albums range from a dozen or so photos up to 166 (sorry!).  There's an album of 39 photos I like best, but I should add a bunch to that one.
  • Peter Gelb Wants to Lose His Job

    23 Jul 2014 | 3:38 pm
    He's threatening to lock out the Met's unionized workers on August 1:In letters to the company’s unionized workers, Mr. Gelb, who is seeking to cut pay and benefits, wrote that “if we are not able to reach agreements by July 31 that would enable the Met to operate on an economically sound basis, please plan for the likelihood of a work stoppage beginning Aug. 1.” He added, “I sincerely hope to avoid such an unfortunate event.” Mr. Gelb said in an interview, “If we haven’t reached agreements, the Met really has no option in my opinion but to impose a lockout.”C'mon:…
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    Musical Assumptions

  • Tanglewood Tales Week 1

    25 Jul 2014 | 9:46 am
  • Rambling on about the Future of Music, Again

    24 Jul 2014 | 1:04 pm
    Nobody can predict the future. We can, however, look around at our present and read about our past, and we can think about what we can do in order to preserve the good things we have living our lives in music. Here are a few facts:It has never in the history of the world been so easy for people to instantly access music they want to listen to (thanks to recordings and computers).It has never in the history of the world been so easy for people to acquire musical skills (thanks to instructional videos and a large number of well-taught teachers who live outside of major cities).It has never in…
  • Summer Strings Concert

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:29 am
    This year's Summer Strings concert on July 22 was a lot of fun for everyone playing, and the audience enjoyed it as well. Here's a photograph from before the concert (taken by Michael before we started). And here's a still from a video shot from afar. I'm hoping to get more pictures.I did manage to get a good recording, though, and I am sharing it through this Dropbox link. There is no need to join Dropbox to listen. You can also see a program there. Remember when listening that this is a community orchestra made of people ranging from around 4 or 5 to their later 70s (I'm not sure of exact…
  • Sam I Am Eggs

    22 Jul 2014 | 12:18 pm
    I was talking with my father about making deviled eggs with Avocado for the picnic before our Summer Strings concert this evening, and he suggested I could make "Sam I Am" eggs. So I did. I also drew this nifty little sign, and made a few extra eggs to have for lunch with Michael. He liked them a lot, and he suggested that I should put the recipe on my blog.So I did. Here's a close-up shot to click on so that you can see the details.I can't give you exact amounts, but I don't think that exact amounts really matter in a recipe like this.I cooked eggs in a steamer (which makes them easier to…
  • Nicolas Slonimsky on Val Rosing

    22 Jul 2014 | 9:09 am
    [From Perfect Pitch]In concert recitals Rosing could get away with anything as long as he was confident that his accompanist would follow him through all his vagaries. But a real disaster befell him when he undertook the lead role in an Eastman School production of Gounod's Faust. He knew the arias, but the recitatives were beyond his power of retention. He sang in French, and as usual was not sure of the words. For safety's sake he planted scraps of paper with words written on them in the scenery for the garden scene, which had a lot of recitative in it. At the last moment, a misguided…
 
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    eighth blackbird » Blog

  • Sila at Lincoln Center Out of Doors

    Yvonne
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:20 am
    Photo by Benjamin Norman for the New York Times   We took a break last weekend from our regularly scheduled vacation to descend upon Lincoln Center Plaza for the world premiere of John Luther Adams’ Sila.  The experience of tuning in (literally) not just to faraway pitches, but to my breath and the breath of so many other people, both restless and rapt, and to the surprising presence of nature in middle of New York City (bird poop on my music, spiders on my bow, and a dragonfly parked on my stand) was truly soul-broadening. It was an extraordinary journey for all the…
  • Guest Post: Katrina Leshan

    Yvonne
    25 Jun 2014 | 11:44 am
      My first memory of new music comes from age 19. I was in Caruth Auditorium at my alma mater Southern Methodist University, and a group of six musicians I had never heard of had won the Meadows Prize: a $10,000 year-long residency at the Meadows School of the Arts. The first of their visits included a concert, during which Steve Reich’s Double Sextet was performed. As I sat in the back of the hall and listened to eighth blackbird and my peers perform this Pulitzer Prize-winning composition, I experienced actual awe. The sounds coming from that stage were unlike anything I had ever…
  • 8bb plays the sidewalk with David Lee Csicsko and Michael Ward-Bergeman

    Yvonne
    17 Jun 2014 | 6:29 pm
    David in the lee of the Hanig Cow Peter staging a lie-in the final effect Nick getting cozy with his doppelgänger David adding some color Michael Tim by the steps of the Chicago Cultural Center Lisa accompanying herself Yvonne Matthew Michael Ward-Bergeman The accordion that swallowed a fly rehearsing with Michael Ward-Bergeman   Today we had a long rehearsal with Michael Ward-Bergeman on our rep for our Millennium Park concert this Thursday at 6:30. In between Michael’s entertaining stories about his Gig365 project, we got a little education on the Big Easy and the tradition of…
  • The Unexpected: 2014

    Yvonne
    20 May 2014 | 3:49 pm
    Tomorrow we join forces with the other two companies of our Creative Partners team, Lucky Plush Productions and Blair Thomas & Co., at the Dance Center of Columbia College. It’ll be a one-of-a-kind event celebrating the second year of our exciting development partnership, with all three companies performing. A three-fer, if you will. Join us for some great performances and a reception afterwards! Here are the deets: DATE: Wednesday, May 21 TIME: 7:00 pm LOCATION: Dance Center of Columbia College, 1306 S. Michigan Avenue TICKETS: Reserve tickets (use discount code 8BB for $5 off!),…
  • mini-golf!

    Yvonne
    9 May 2014 | 10:26 am
    a mustachioed Rachel Yvonne taking a shot deranged hole-guard-dog Matt and Michael Nick and Emi Matt, Doug, Nick, Jake, and Emi Peter and Annie killing Dance Dance Revolution psychedelic mushrooms and butterflies   Indoor mini-golf. Arcade games. And black light. Need I say more?? This is the outing our fun-loving staff planned for eighth blackbird’s end of season romp. Fabulous Founding Violinist Matt Albert (herein referred to as FFV) was also in town and joined us for 18 holes and some serious arcade action.  An evening, nay, career highlight for many was seeing Ryan and Peter…
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    On An Overgrown Path

  • The problem is obvious - there is too much classical music

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:18 am
    In a glowing review in the Guardian Andrew Clements describes the Freiburg Opera's Parsifal at the Norwich Theatre Royal - see production shot above - as "a show that almost any British company would be happy to have in its repertory". Yet despite the production's obvious quality, the four performances by the Freiburg company of Parsifal and Tannhäuser attracted lamentably small audiences. A London based critic blamed low profile promotion by the Norwich theatre for the poor attendance, and given the limited budget of the provincial venue, which has charitable status and no material public…
  • Max Hole is right, classical music is an elitist club

    29 Jul 2014 | 11:52 am
    Universal Music ceo Max Hole has used the launch of the Bristol Proms to once again denounce classical music as "an elitist club". And he is right, classical music is an elitist club, and there is no better example than the Bristol Proms. This new concert series, which is hailed in the Guardian as "revolutionary", is managed and promoted by U-Live in conjunction with the Bristol Old Vic". U-Live is part of an elitist club otherwise known as Universal Music which controls, among other things, more than 50% of the recorded classical music market, and U-Live is simply a vehicle for giving…
  • On the road to enlightenment

    28 Jul 2014 | 1:15 am
    Éliane Radigue's electronic paeans to Tibetan Buddhism, Trilogie de la Mort and Jetsun Mila featured heavily in my iPod playlist for a recent road trip from Kalka to Leh in the north of India. As my photos show, the road climbs from Kalka on the edge of the Ganges plain over the western end of the Himalayas to reach the alpine desert of Ladakh - 'Little Tibet' - seen in the final photo. En route the road crosses some of the highest passes in the world: three are over 15,000 feet with the highest, the Taglang La pass reaching 17,480 feet. The 500 mile drive took three long days on the road…
  • Classical music should be an agenda-free zone

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:45 am
    In the past when classical record sales were sluggish, industry luminaries such as Walter Legge and John Culshaw (seen above with Sir Georg Solti) sorted things out by making legendary recordings such as the Giulini Verdi Requiem and the Solti Ring. Nowadays, when sales are slack, a luminary such as Max Hole goes on Classic FM to advocate tearing down the Royal Festival Hall, and then feeds the story to a conveniently on side journalist in the futile hope that the alchemy of social media will transmute contentious sound bites into sales revenues. Quite predictably, the latest proposals by the…
  • Audiences can cope if given the opportunity

    24 Jul 2014 | 12:19 am
    In that photo senior Tibetan Buddhist monk Kenrap-la is introduced to Jonathan Harvey's Body Mandala for the first time. He is listening via my iPod as we approach his monastery at Thiksay at the end of the arduous 800 km drive from Kalka in the foothills of the Himalayas to Ladakh on the border of India and Tibet. When I took the photo we were 15,000 feet above sea level and more than 1000 km from the nearest concert hall, in a region where symphony orchestras are unknown and Western art music is culturally alien. Yet, despite this, Kenrap-la listened engrossed for the whole fifteen minutes…
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    Jason Heath's Double Bass Blog

  • Everything you need to know about tennis elbow for the bass

    Jason Heath
    7 Jul 2014 | 6:50 pm
    The International Society of Bassists (@ISB_World) recently put out a post featuring Randy Kurtz talking about tennis elbow for bassists.  This is something that affects a great number of bassists, and this video is well worth a viewing for a better understanding of the condition. Video Link
  • Bassist Matt Heller named as one of Alberta’s 50 Most Influential People

    Jason Heath
    2 Jul 2014 | 1:16 pm
    It makes me incredibly happy to see double bassist Matt Heller named as one of Alberta’s 50 most influential people!  Matt and I go way back–we did the American Russian Youth Orchestra ad Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival together in the late nineties, and we have kept in touch during his time in Chicago and now Canada as a bassist in the Calgary Philharmonic. Matt is an active writer and has served as president of the Organization of Canadian Symphony Musicians.  He also appeared on a Contrabass Conversations episode several years ago.  He’s a great guy and is a great…
  • Thierry Barbé plays Dvorak Cello Concerto

    Jason Heath
    1 Jul 2014 | 6:50 pm
    Check out this video of bassist Thierry Barbé (my friend that I met serving together on the board of the International Society of Bassists) performing the Dvorak Cello Concerto on bass!
  • Next Level Bassist – a great offering from Ranaan Meyer

    Jason Heath
    1 Jul 2014 | 5:57 pm
    If you aren’t familiar with Ranaan Meyer’s publication Next Level Bassist, you really should check it out. This free quarterly publication delivers a high-quality electronic journal to your inbox four times a year. It’s a thoughtful and useful resource that has thrived for the past several years, and I continue to learn from every issue. Check out Ranaan’s Contrabass Conversations interview if you haven’t before, and if you’re a student or are looking for a chance to grow as a bassist, Ranaan’s Wabass summer program is highly recommended.
  • Things to Know About Your Bass Bridge from Donovan Stokes

    Jason Heath
    30 Jun 2014 | 8:07 pm
    Great article from @notreble from former Contrabass Conversations guest Donovan Stokes: Having a properly set up bridge on your upright is an important factor in the playability, sound and the long-term health of your instrument. Here are some things every upright player should know: The internal, not external, notches you see on the F-holes determine the proper distance of the bridge from the fingerboard. They should correspond, more or less, to the center of each bridge foot. Furthermore the feet should be in a straight line from E side to G side. Bridges without height adjusters won’t…
 
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    The Naxos Blog

  • Scoring ten

    Naxos-FC
    17 Jul 2014 | 9:29 pm
    Most people know about the curse of the ninth, but if you don’t, here’s a quick explanation. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Choral (8.550181) laid down a few benchmarks. Its influence was felt most recently, perhaps, during the dawn of the age of the compact disc. Consideration had to be given to how many minutes of music a standard CD should be able to accommodate. It was decided that the capacity must be long enough to take a complete performance of Beethoven’s last symphony, without spilling over to a second disc. Back to the nineteenth century: Beethoven was already…
  • 1 out of 8: the BBC Proms opening week

    Naxos-FC
    10 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Next Friday, 18 July sees the opening concert of the celebrated BBC Promenade Concerts, the world’s largest music festival. Planning the programmes for the daily schedule of concerts during the 8-week jamboree must be a headache. There will always be those who focus on the lack of this or an imbalance in that, but the remarkable attendance figures suggest that the organisers have got their heads firmly screwed on. Rather than opining about the overall repertoire line-up, we thought we could dip into a few of the concerts taking place during the first week of the festival and see if…
  • Multiplied by the power of one

    Naxos-FC
    4 Jul 2014 | 3:10 am
    There’s no doubting the thrill of hearing a pot-bellied orchestra going for climactic points in a score with all its might and dislodging the dust from concert hall rafters. Yet the other end of the textural spectrum can be equally telling. Mozart reminded us that silence is possibly the most powerful element in music. Equally magical are those moments when the layers in a work slim right down to a single line, instilling fear into anyone in the auditorium who might be thinking of releasing a good cough at that moment. I recall the first time I heard a live performance of Walton‘s…
  • The Magic Fruit

    Naxos-FC
    26 Jun 2014 | 9:00 am
    I expect many of us spend more time in supermarkets nowadays scrutinising the contents of packets of this and tins of that. Never before have we been made more aware of the devil being in the detail, and the fact that we are what we eat. I started to wonder what my choices would be if I had to label pieces of music according to their contribution to auditory health. Any suggestions for a piece that contains ‘bad cholesterol’? How about ‘high on sugar’, ‘a reliable source of protein’ or ‘raises/lowers blood pressure’? I decided a simpler option…
  • My hero. Yours, too?

    Naxos-FC
    19 Jun 2014 | 9:00 am
    Where would we be without our heroes? Well, classical music would certainly be the poorer without the heroic thread that weaves through the catalogue. Works are branded heroic either by their general aura, the mention of the word in the title, or the name of a specific hero on which a piece is built. We would all have our individual list of ‘heroic’ works, if asked to compile one. The following small selection may resonate with your own; or it may throw up something worth getting to know, if you are not already familiar with a piece. With this month marking the 150th anniversary…
 
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    I CARE IF YOU LISTEN

  • Five Ottawa Composers Premiere Variations You Can Warm To

    Curtis Perry
    29 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Ottawa, Canada has had the privilege of playing host to two of the largest chamber music festivals in the world for five years now, and to one for fifteen before that. On Friday, July 11, the first of these, Music & Beyond, played host to its first concert during the 2014 festival dedicated primarily or [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • This week: concerts in New York (July 28 – August 3, 2014)

    Sam Reising
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    José González / yMusic Modern-day troubadour González’s poignantly delicate voice, masterfully eloquent classical guitar, achingly emotional melodies, and thought-provoking lyrics will be reframed by new chamber orchestra arrangements by Rob Moose in a world premiere collaboration with yMusic. Thursday, July 31 at 7 PM Free Damrosch Park Bandshell, Lincoln Center, New York, NY ..:: Website [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • French Composers’ Names – Jean-Claude Risset

    Thomas Deneuville
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Another composer in our French Composers’ Names series: Jean-Claude Risset. Well, composer and researcher. Risset came to composition after considering being a concert pianist (he studied with Robert Trimaille, himself a student of Alfred Cortot) but he also studied Physics in parallel, and graduated from the most prestigious science institutes in France. NBD. Risset is one [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • Flux Quartet Delivers a Reference Recording of Feldman’s String Quartet No. 1

    Bruce A. Russell
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    The FLUX Quartet have masterfully laid claim to the complete string quartets of Morton Feldman, becoming legends of new music along the way. They famously premiered the integral six-hour version of String Quartet No. 2 and later recorded it as part of Mode Records’ excellent Feldman Edition (in 1999 and 2002, respectively). It stood to [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
  • 5 Questions to Tobias Picker (Composer)

    David Dies
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    On July 20, 2014, the Glimmerglass Festival presented the premiere of a new version of composer Tobias Picker and librettist Gene Scheer’s An American Tragedy, originally commissioned by and premiered at the Metropolitan Opera in 2005. Nine performances in total will be presented until August 24. We asked Picker five questions… You have said that you knew [...] Visit I CARE IF YOU LISTEN's Blog to read more!
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    Artiden

  • How You Can Give Better Music Feedback

    Grace Miles
    29 Jul 2014 | 7:26 pm
     We’re kind of obsessed with the “best.” We train in the “best” schools. Chefs cook the “best” meals. We debate about the “best” music technique. You might recall a typical music lesson where the teacher describes the “best” way to play a phrase– light here, mezzoforte there. And the feedback is taken badly. Or, in a music […]
  • The Ultimate Guide to Starting a Group Music Class

    Grace Miles
    13 Jul 2014 | 6:39 am
    Many people ask about starting a business, in particular, how to teach music. In January, I met a girl who was building her business and I thought we’d cheer each other on as buddies, because my first rule to excelling in some area is finding a friend in the same space. I shared my favourite tools and strategies with […]
  • Looking for daily music motivation? Get it here.

    Grace Miles
    25 Jun 2014 | 7:52 am
    A buddy of mine is a Master at meditation. I’ve never seen her do it, but I sensed dedication when she said, at the end of our design coaching session: “I got more than I expected from you, but I wish we met somewhere suitable for meditation.” When it comes to making important decisions, we all have ways […]
  • How to Build Your Support Team

    Grace Miles
    19 Jun 2014 | 1:34 pm
    There’s the idea that musicians– and creative people– are solitary creatures. We practice alone, perform alone, win alone. But really, the best thing musicians can do for themselves is build a strong team of support. You are the average of the five people around you. I suspect that if my friends in high school were […]
  • 3 Non-Sketchy Ways to Gain Students Using Your Music Website

    Grace Miles
    5 Jun 2014 | 2:33 pm
    A good website is powerful– it can attract students, 24/7. Working with design clients, this question always catches me off-guard: How did you learn all this… design? “I learned it myself,” I say. But I didn’t describe the thousands of hours sketching and nudging graphics and training my eye for design. Since many Artiden readers are music teachers, here […]
 
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    Classical Commentary: Barry Lenson's Classical Music Blog

  • Remembering Carlo Bergonzi

    Barry Lenson
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:08 am
    Carlo Bergonzi, one of the greatest Italian tenors of the last 100 years, just died at age 90. There are a lot of obituaries for him all over the Internet today. If you want to know the story of his extraordinary life, I’d encourage you to read a few of them.On my blog today, I just want to say how lucky I was to hear him sing in a performance of Aida at the Metropolitan Opera back in the 1970s.  It was a performance that I will never forget – impassioned, cultivated, vocally beautiful and secure, and stylistically impeccable too. He was in every way an aristocratic Italian tenor –…
  • Nikolai Medtner and Other Magnificent Anachronisms

    Barry Lenson
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:19 am
    "Afternoon at Cape Cod" by my father Michael Lenson (1903-1971)Note the influence - not dominance- of cubism and abstractionI love artists who are a little behind the times. Perhaps that is because my father Michael Lenson was one of them. He was a fine realist painter who simply refused to paint purely abstract paintings, even during the 1950s when most of his fellow realists were doing just that so they could get their works into juried exhibitions and galleries. Not my dad. He wasn’t about to toss aside his hard-won ability to paint the human figure. He went into his studio every day and…
  • Coming Soon, Carol Oja’s Explosive New Book Reveals Leonard Bernstein’s Role as Civil Rights Champion

    Barry Lenson
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:10 pm
    A few months ago my wife and I went to hear a lecture given by Prof. Carol J. Oja about her upcoming book, Bernstein Meets Broadway: Collaborative Art in a Time of War. Because the lecture was sponsored by the New York Philharmonic, I expected one more evening of adoration directed at Leonard Bernstein by his still-faithful New York Public.I was unprepared for what I heard from Prof. Oja, who is William Powell Mason Professor at Harvard University.  In her quiet and straightforward presentation, she laid out the astonishing story of Bernstein’s fearless support of African-American and…
  • The Best Way to Listen to Classical Music on Your Computer, Tablet or Smartphone Is Still . . . Classical Archives

    Barry Lenson
    25 Jun 2014 | 9:45 am
    Let me start today’s post with a quick disclaimer about my relationship with Classical Archives. I have subscribed to Classical Archives for about three years. I really like Classical Archives. I have written about it before on this blog. Also, I have been writing articles for the Classical Archives eNewsletter for several months now – it’s an unpaid assignment that I took on because (you guessed it) I really like Classical Archives. But despite all that, I am committed today to writing an objective comparison of different ways to listen to classical music on your computer, tablet, or…
  • Take the Distant Voices Classical Music Trivia Quiz

    Barry Lenson
    9 Jun 2014 | 4:45 am
    I took a lot of liberties with music history when I was writing my new novel Distant Voices. All of the characters are fictional, but I created many of them by combining information about the lives of musical figures who actually lived.Just for fun, I have created a musical trivia quiz for you to enjoy today. You need not have read Distant Voices to enjoy it. So here we go . . . 1) In the opening scene in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, one of the grave robbers turns and talks to a statue that is mounted on a crypt. In what opera does something similar happen? a. Benvenuto Cellinib. Normac.
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    Stars & Catz » Classical Music & Opera Buzz

  • Richard Addinsell: The Admirable Crichton + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    29 Jul 2014 | 5:24 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   ‘Carmen’ at Wolf Trap – ionarts.blogspot.com Wolf Trap Opera’s important work is in the intimate indoor venue of the Barns, like Handel’s Giulio Cesare in Egitto last month. The company, a training ground for young singers, also usually gives at least one performance in the Filene Center, a cavernous […]
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray, Wheeler Opera House, Aspen, Colorado + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:53 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   West Edge Opera’s Hydrogen Jukebox – operatattler.typepad.com * Notes * West Edge Opera is currently performing a summer festival at the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley. Today was the opening of Philip Glass' chamber opera Hydrogen Jukebox, with text by Allen Ginsberg. The space is not a typical performance […]
  • The Three Choirs Festival Commemorates the Great War with War Requiem + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:23 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Welsh Exodus – lietofinelondon.wordpress.com Review – Moses und Aron (Welsh National Opera, Covent Garden, Saturday 26 July 2014) Moses – John Tomlinson Aron – Rainer Trost Chorus & Extra Chorus of Welsh National Opera Orchestra of Welsh National Opera Directors – Jossi Wieler & Sergio Morabito Revival Director – […]
  • Carlo Bergonzi, Masterful Operatic Tenor, Dies at 90 + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    26 Jul 2014 | 3:52 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Three great new reviews ! – classical-iconoclast.blogspot.com Claire Seymour’s reveiws in Opera TodayDer Rosenkavalier Prom 6Glagolitic Mass Prom 9Donizetti and Mozart – Jette Parker Young Artists ROH Continue Reading On classical-iconoclast.blogspot.com » Carlo Bergonzi, Masterful Operatic Tenor, Dies at 90 – www.nytimes.com Mr. Bergonzi, small and admittedly without leading-man […]
  • ArtsBeat: Rain Cuts Short Once-in-a-Generation Performance of ‘Hommy’ + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:24 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   New Carol for Merton – www.planethugill.com Sean DohertyThe composer Sean Doherty has won the 2014 Choir and Organ Composition Competition with his carol A Nywe Werk. The competition was presented by Choir and Organ Magazine in partnership with Merton College, Oxford and the entrants had to submit an Advent […]
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    The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source

  • Composer Ellen Taaffe Zwilich to Replace Pamela Frank On Indianapolis Competition Jury

    admin
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:30 am
    It has been announced today that American violinist Pamela Frank has stood down from the jury of the 2014 9th International Violin Competition of Indianapolis – due to the illness of her father, renowned pianist Claude Frank. Ms Frank’s position will be replaced by Ellen Taaffe Zwilich – this year’s competition commissioned composer. Ms Zwilish, a composer and accomplished violinist, studied with Richard Burgin and Ivan Galamian – and performed for seven years as a member of the American Symphony Orchestra. We wish Mr Frank a speedy recovery. The quadrennial…
  • VC YOUNG ARTIST | Fédor Roudine, 22 – Postacchini, Spohr, Yankelevitch, Kachaturian, Lipizer, Marteau & Valsesia 1st Prizes

    admin
    26 Jul 2014 | 8:53 am
    22 year old Russian-born, French violin virtuoso Fédor Roudine is firmly establishing himself as one of the new generation’s most exciting and gifted young concert soloists – praised for his maturity, virtuosity and profound musicality. FEDOR ROUDINE | SIBELIUS VIOLIN CONCERTO | 3RD MVT | 2014 VALSESIA MUSICA INTERNATIONAL VIOLIN COMPETITION | 1ST PRIZE A student of Pierre Amoyal at the Mozarteum University, in Salzburg, Fédor is a former 1st prize winner at the Postacchini, Spohr, Yankelevitch, Khachaturian, Lipizer, Henri Marteau and Valsesia International Violin…
  • VERY SAD NEWS | Legendary Italian Tenor Carlo Bergonzi has Passed Away

    admin
    26 Jul 2014 | 8:42 am
    Legendary Italian operatic tenor Carlo Bergonzi has passed away – aged 90. A Verdi specialist, Maestro Bergonzi will long be remembered for his beautiful lyricism and diction, smooth legato, warm timbre and elegant phrasing. Our condolences are with his family, friends and colleagues. CARLO BERGONZI | MAYERBEER | L’AFRICAINE | ‘OH PARADISO’ | 1969 The post VERY SAD NEWS | Legendary Italian Tenor Carlo Bergonzi has Passed Away appeared first on The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source.
  • FLASHBACK FRIDAY | Dmitri Sitkovetsky, Beethoven Violin Concerto – 1997 [VIDEO]

    admin
    25 Jul 2014 | 10:56 pm
    1997 archival video footage of the then 42 year old Soviet Russian-born violin virtuoso Dmitri Sitkovetsky performing the 3rd movement from Beethoven’s Violin Concerto – conducted by Maestro Dmitri Kitaenko and the NHK Symphony Orchestra. DMITRY SITKOVETSKY | BEETHOVEN | VIOLIN CONCERTO | 3RD MVT | KITAENKO | NHK SYMPHONY | 1997 The post FLASHBACK FRIDAY | Dmitri Sitkovetsky, Beethoven Violin Concerto – 1997 [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | The World's Leading Violin, Strings & Classical Music News Source.
  • Coroner Concludes Whistleblower Frances Andrade Died From Accidental ‘Lethal Overdose’

    admin
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:49 pm
    A UK coroner has concluded violinist Frances Andrade, who was found deceased at her home in England in January 2013 one week after testifying against Chetham’s School of Music’s former Music Director Michael Brewer, died from an accidental ‘lethal overdose’ – not suicide. “Her reason to overdose was not to kill herself but was a way to cope with the court case,” Coroner Richard Travers has said. The coroner’s findings have criticised the British mental health services for “failing” to care for the mother-of-four who had been left “extremely…
 
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    Stephen P Brown

  • 30 years ago today…

    stephenpbrown
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:37 am
      The first time I set foot on USA soil was Friday the 13th of July, 1984, just a little more than 6 weeks after my 14th birthday. My life took a crazy wild turn upside-down, inside-out, and both left and right at the same time. I was going to spend 3 … Give me more... →
  • (LTSD): Focus

    stephenpbrown
    12 Jul 2014 | 11:39 am
    Nowadays, thanks to record labels’ marketers, a lot of people think that Mozart’s music is useful primarily to affect mood. I’m saddened by the number of people who will spend the rest of their lives falling asleep whenever they hear the second movement of Mozart’s second flute concerto or something similar. Instead … Give me more... →
  • Reduced to being grateful

    stephenpbrown
    10 Jul 2014 | 9:26 pm
    Originally posted in August 2012.   This quote is truly perceptive! “Aside from purely technical analysis, nothing can be said about music, except when it is bad; when it is good, one can only listen and be grateful.” W.H.Auden What do you think? There are times when this doesn’t just apply … Give me more... →
  • #PsalmQuest 24 – Mirror 4 for harp quartet

    stephenpbrown
    3 Jul 2014 | 6:48 pm
      Meeting people on Twitter can be fun! It can also lead to some mighty challenges. Such as composing a piece of music for four harps. I had no idea what I was getting myself into, but writing this piece took forever (it seems). The end result is a delightful piece … Give me more... →
  • #PsalmQuest 23 – Cerddoriaeth 1 for solo marimba

    stephenpbrown
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:27 pm
    Music is organized sound that expresses an idea or emotion, whether sung with words, or played on a flute, tree, tuba, saucepan, guitar, cello, or marimba, etc. Over the years, several elements of music have been identified that all organized sounds seem to have in common. One of them is … Give me more... →
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