Classical Music

  • Most Topular Stories

  • EDITOR’S BRUNCH: NICOLA BENEDETTI AND LEONARD ELSCHENBROICH

    The Amati Magazine
    Jessica Duchen
    2 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Amati is delighted to present a substantial interview with Nicola Benedetti and her partner, cellist Leonard Elschenbroich – the first non-filmed one they have given together. Over a lavish West London brunch they tell Jessica Duchen about helping one another, finding your own pace, and practising in the bathroom   Nicola Benedetti and Leonard Elschenbroich. Photo by Jane Lawrence   Nicola Benedetti and Leonard Elschenbroich cut quite a couple, charismatic even off duty as they wander together into Annie’s Restaurant in Barnes well before lunchtime. Time to stop, eat…
  • Can’t afford to attend audition? Try this…

    Slipped Disc
    norman lebrecht
    4 Aug 2015 | 3:12 pm
    This is the time of year when young musicians travel around in search of positions… and few of them can afford the fares and accommodation. So a pair of Aspen students have come up with a crowdfunding source. At this stage, it’s open only to string players. Read about it here. Apply for your funding here.
  • Gilligan's Hamlet

    Musical Assumptions
    29 Jul 2015 | 2:12 pm
    These were the original words as far as I was concerned, because it was on Gilligan's Island more than 40 years ago that I heard these melodies for the first time. I saw this episode only once and somehow all the words have remained vividly etched in my brain (though the images were only in black and white). I had no idea what Hamlet was, or why this would be parody. I thought it was just a nice treat for those of us who faithfully watched the show.
  • And Then This Happened

    Adaptistration
    Drew McManus
    4 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    It looks like the Cleveland Orchestra has found a replacement for outgoing executive director Gary Hanson and it’s the former New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO) and Melbourne Symphony exec André Gremillet. According to a press statement from the orchestra, Gremillet is credited with “successfully enhance[ing] the fiscal health” of the NJSO although that phrasing may come as a surprise to many in that institution. According to an 8/3/2015 article in The Plain Dealer by Zachary Lewis, Gremillet lists an accomplishment of a $35 million capital campaign project during his…
  • Cold Mountain Wows Audience at Santa Fe World Premiere

    Opera Today
    mnockin@icloud.com
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:12 pm
    On August 1, 2015, Santa Fe Opera presented the world premiere of Cold Mountain, a brand new opera composed by Pulizer Prize and Grammy winner Jennifer Higdon.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Slipped Disc

  • Can’t afford to attend audition? Try this…

    norman lebrecht
    4 Aug 2015 | 3:12 pm
    This is the time of year when young musicians travel around in search of positions… and few of them can afford the fares and accommodation. So a pair of Aspen students have come up with a crowdfunding source. At this stage, it’s open only to string players. Read about it here. Apply for your funding here.
  • Dmitri Hvorostovsky, fighting back

    norman lebrecht
    4 Aug 2015 | 10:09 am
    The great baritone, undergoing treatment in London for a brain tumour, has just posted a defiant picture… …with a message: ‘Grateful for so much support from my family, friends, medical team, and fans. Fighting the good fight!’
  • Best news: Baritone announces comeback after 8 months silence

    norman lebrecht
    4 Aug 2015 | 9:20 am
    Best news of the day: Simon Keenlyside has confirmed that he will sing Macbeth with the Royal Opera on tour in Japan in September. Simon has been resting his voice on doctors’ orders since December. He recently cancelled an October run at the Met, but this appears to be related to personal issues, unconnected to his vocal health. The entire profession will rise to welcome him back. In other news, Simon will sing Fagin in Oliver! at Grange Park in summer 2016.
  • Concertmaster gets fine eased, but still pays $60,000

    norman lebrecht
    4 Aug 2015 | 8:55 am
    Three years ago Yosuke Kawasaki, concertmaster of the National Arts Center orchestra in Ottawa, had his violin and bows seized by Customs on entering Canada. Later, he was ordered to pay a C$120,000 fine to release them. After fighting the case through the courts he has now been told to pay C$59,650, the amount he would have shelled out at the border had he originally declared the instruments at Customs. Despite the latest remission, it would seem that he has been treated harshly nonetheless. Report here.  
  • Opera North mourns 34-year stalwart

    norman lebrecht
    4 Aug 2015 | 8:39 am
    Peter Bodenham, a vibrant acting member in the Opera North chorus, has died at the age of 64. He joined the company from Scottish Opera in 1981 and was one of its most popular characters. Notice here.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Adaptistration

  • How Dare You Sir! How…Dare…You.

    Drew McManus
    5 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    Vu Le posted another one of his highly entertaining articles at Nonprofit With Balls on 8/3/2015 that examines the highly competitive nature of donor hoarding and donor poaching, otherwise known as fear incarnate. In the style that’s rocketed him to popularity among the nonprofit blogging world, Le disarms explosive topics by way of satire, which is what makes this a refreshing entry into such a well-worn topic. In fact, if anyone with a few decades or more experience in this field had a nickel for every time s/he has dealt with insane behavior related to donor poaching, we probably…
  • And Then This Happened

    Drew McManus
    4 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    It looks like the Cleveland Orchestra has found a replacement for outgoing executive director Gary Hanson and it’s the former New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO) and Melbourne Symphony exec André Gremillet. According to a press statement from the orchestra, Gremillet is credited with “successfully enhance[ing] the fiscal health” of the NJSO although that phrasing may come as a surprise to many in that institution. According to an 8/3/2015 article in The Plain Dealer by Zachary Lewis, Gremillet lists an accomplishment of a $35 million capital campaign project during his…
  • Are You Running Windows 10 Yet?

    Drew McManus
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    Let’s cut right to the chase: go update your PC to Windows 10. Now. If you’re running any version of Windows 7 or Windows 8, you can upgrade to Windows 10 free of charge and unlike most Windows Operating System (OS) updates, this one doesn’t require substantial hardware improvements to meet the minimum system requirements. All of this should come as extraordinarily welcome news for arts organizations in that many will be able to take advantage of everything Windows 10 brings to the table without spending a dime. You will find no shortage of excellent articles detailing…
  • Frank Almond Is Back In Action

    Drew McManus
    31 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    After an extended break thanks to the ongoing legal proceedings related to the Lipiński Stradivarius theft, Milwaukee Symphony concertmaster Frank Almond is back to blogging at his Inside The Arts blog, non divisi. His welcome back post announces a new Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for a second volume in a series of recordings featuring the Lipiński Strad and after only a few days, he’s a quarter of the way toward the $15,000 goal. In what may be one of the most understated tag lines yet for a Kickstarter album project, Almond opts to soft sell via the project’s…
  • Philharmonic Locked Out, Union Prez: “WTF?!”

    Drew McManus
    30 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    No, there’s no actual lockout, today’s headline click-bait references one of the many gags in the closing story arc from Who’s Minding The Score? which now has the final two years available in the new binge friendly format. There’s a good union related mini-arc that includes the WTF toon along with several others that result in someone receiving medical treatment for a busted-up arm. If that weren’t enough, you’ll also find story arcs centered on a capital project, a music director that temporarily speaks in Japanese after getting shot in the head…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    NewMusicBox

  • NewMusicBox LIVE! presents Gabriel Kahane

    Molly Sheridan
    4 Aug 2015 | 6:13 am
    In between highlights from his various albums, Gabriel Kahane charmed the gathered crowd with his story of moldy cookies, the letter, the golf sweater (which he was wearing), and a business trade with a most unexpected twist.
  • It’s a Floor Wax and a Dessert Topping

    Rachel Peters
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    I won’t rehash any discussions about the technical differences between musicals and operas, but I am interested in exploring preconceived notions held by those working in both genres and the effect they have on composing for the theater.
  • Words After Music: Stories from the Archive

    Molly Sheridan
    1 Aug 2015 | 6:09 am
    Advice from new music veterans on maintaining motivation, making career choices, and standing up to your critics. Also, we explain hip hop to Milton Babbitt.
  • Got a Question? Get Answers on Twitter #MUSOCHAT

    Molly Sheridan
    31 Jul 2015 | 6:12 am
    This Sunday the virtual #musochat salon will hold its third open door event on Twitter to talk creative issues and career quandaries. How did all this get started in the first place? Here’s what we now know...
  • The Entrepreneurship of the Creative Moment

    Justin Ralls
    30 Jul 2015 | 8:26 am
    How can artists serve the social good, create excellent work, and critique the system when it is the system which is actively eroding the social good and preventing them from accomplishing excellent work?
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

  • Nightafternight playlist

    Alex Ross
    4 Aug 2015 | 12:26 pm
    New recordings of interest. — Anna Thorvaldsdottir, In the Light of Air; ICE (Sono Luminus, available Aug. 28) — Shostakovich, Symphony No. 10, Passacaglia from Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk; Andris Nelsons conducting the Boston Symphony (DG) — Rossini, Guillaume Tell; Andrew Foster-Williams, Michael Spyres, Judith Howarth, Nahuel Di Pierro, Tara Stafford, Alessandra Volpe, Artavazd Sargsyan, Antonino Fogliani conducting the Virtuosi Brunensis and Camerata Bach Choir (Naxos) — Niccolò Castiglioni, La Buranella, Altisonanza, Salmo XIX; Gianandrea Noseda conducting the Danish National…
  • Partch & Smyth

    Alex Ross
    2 Aug 2015 | 11:17 pm
    Renegades. The New Yorker, Aug. 10 and 17, 2015.
  • A Johanna Beyer moment

    Alex Ross
    2 Aug 2015 | 10:01 am
  • Bookshelf

    Alex Ross
    1 Aug 2015 | 2:01 pm
    New and recent publications of interest. Elijah Wald, Dylan Goes Electric! (Dey Street) Leonora Saavedra, ed., Carlos Chávez and His World (Princeton University Press) Carl Wilson, Let's Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste (new and expanded edition) (Bloomsbury) Amy C. Beal, Johanna Beyer (University of Illinois Press) Roger Evans, Music and Power (RogerEvansOnline) John Cage, Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only Make Matters Worse) (Siglio, coming in October) David Novak and Matt Sakakeeny, eds., Keywords in Sound (Duke University Press) Danielle…
  • A Chávez moment

    Alex Ross
    1 Aug 2015 | 8:04 am
    Will Robin writes in the Sunday New York Times about the Mexican master, who is at the center of this summer's Bard Music Festival.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sequenza21/

  • RighteousGIRLS CD release party

    Jay Batzner
    4 Aug 2015 | 8:48 am
    RighteousGIRLS will be celebrating their new disc gathering blue with a release party at Joe’s Pub at 7 P.M. this Friday, August 7th. Flutist Gina Izzo and pianist Erika Dohi will, of course, be there to throw down with their exciting and inventive program and they will be joined by Kendrick Scott & Andy Akiho as well! RighteousGIRLS collected an exceptional collection of genre-blending works using flute, piano, electronics, guest performers, improvisation, and all the things that make today’s contemporary music engaging and exciting. A video of Pascal Le Boeuf’s piece…
  • Jennifer Higdon’s ‘Cold Mountain’ Debuts Tonight in Santa Fe

    Jerry Bowles
    3 Aug 2015 | 11:29 am
    (via Amanda Ameer) Jennifer Higdon’s first opera, Cold Mountain, premieres at The Santa Fe Opera on August 1, 2015 and runs until August 24. The August 24 performance was added due to interest leading to a sold-out run. Opera Philadelphia will give the East Coast premiere of Cold Mountain and a recording on Pentatone will be released in the 2015-16 season. Cold Mountain takes an American story as its subject—the desertion of Confederate soldier W.P. Inman to return to his love in the mountains of North Carolina during the Civil War. Based on Charles Frazier’s best-selling novel,…
  • ‘Man on a Wire’ in Pasadena

    Paul Muller
    31 Jul 2015 | 8:36 am
    Saturday, July 25, 2015 at Boston Court, People Inside Electronics presented Man on a Wire, a concert of new music featuring pianist Aron Kallay.  A capacity crowd filled the Branson performance space to hear eight pieces incorporating electronics, piano, keyboards and acoustic instruments. The first piece was Four Roses (1997) by Annie Gosfield and this was written for cello and de-tuned keyboard. Aron Kallay played the electronic keyboard and Maggie Parkins, cello. According to the program notes “Three of the cello strings are tuned conventionally, and the ‘A’ string is tuned…
  • Synchromy Concert in Pasadena

    Paul Muller
    23 Jul 2015 | 8:03 am
    Friday night July 17 and Boston Court in Pasadena was the venue for a concert titled Music From Text presented by Synchromy, the Los Angeles-based composers collective. Brightwork newmusic was the featured performing group and a sell-out crowd gathered for an evening of contemporary music based on the spoken word.   Breathe by John Frantzen began the concert and this performance was the world premiere. Breathe is based on a poem written by composer’s brother about the trials, hardships and relationships as experienced in military life. In the program notes John Frantzen states that…
  • Andy Plays Jay

    Christian Carey
    10 Jul 2015 | 6:30 pm
    Three cheers for the home team! Jay Batzner, a Contributing Editor to Sequenza 21, has a new recording out on the Irritable Hedgehog imprint. as if to each other …, a 25 minute long EP played by pianist R. Andrew Lee, is now available via their website.  
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical Performance Podcast

  • Brahms, with David Deveau and the Shanghai Quartet

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    20 Jul 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Pianist David Deveau and the Shanghai String Quartet play Brahms at the 2015 Rockport Chamber Music Festival. Johannes Brahms: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25 David Deveau, piano; Shanghai String Quartet Recorded at the Shalin Liu Performance Center, Rockport Massachusetts on June 7, 2015. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts Photo: Paul Carey Goldberg, courtesy Rockport Chamber Music Festival
  • Beethoven, with the Shanghai String Quartet

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    22 Jun 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The Shanghai Quartet play Beethoven on opening weekend of the 2015 Rockport Chamber Music Festival Ludwig van Beethoven: String Quartet No. 6 in B-flat, Op. 18 No. 6 Shanghai String Quartet Recorded at the Shalin Liu Performance Center, Rockport Massachusetts on June 6, 2015. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
  • Bach, with Sergey Schepkin

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    26 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Bach, with Sergey Schepkin Johann Sebastian Bach: Capriccio on the Departure of His Most Beloved Brother, BWV. 992 Sergey Schepkin, piano Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, March 7, 2013. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts Photo credit: Kathy Chapman
  • Ravel, with the Chameleon Arts Ensemble

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    11 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Ravel, with the Chameleon Arts Ensemble Maurice Ravel: Introduction and Allegro Members of the Chameleon Arts Ensemble: Anna Reinersman, harp; Deborah Boldin, flute; Kelli O'Connor, clarinet; Joanna Kurkowicz, violin; Heidi Braun-Hill, violin; Scott Woolweaver, viola; Rafael Popper-Keizer, cello Recorded in WGBH's Studio One, May 16, 2003. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts Photo credit: Susan Wilson
  • Beethoven, with Anton Nel

    WGBH Educational Foundation
    5 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Pianist Anton Nel plays Beethoven and Mendelssohn Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 6 in F, Op. 10 No. 2 Mendelssohn: Fantasy in F-sharp minor, Op. 28 Anton Nel, piano Recorded in WCRB’s Fraser Performance Studio, December 4, 2008. © 2015 WGBH Educational Foundation. http://www.classicalwcrb.org/podcasts
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    JDCMB

  • On holiday

    29 Jul 2015 | 3:20 pm
    My holiday, however, involves a Jonas-and-Kristine fix in Munich on Friday night and Tristan at Bayreuth on Sunday. So I might end up writing something about some of it, wifi willing. Failing that, I leave you with this...
  • Cheering up with the Wonderland Blues

    25 Jul 2015 | 2:27 am
    Before all that rain started, we spent a gorgeous afternoon at Opera Holland Park, under the leaves in the Yucca Lawn groves, watching Will Todd's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. It's on until 1 August, so assuming we're clear of the rain, do try and catch a show.It's one of those rare delights that holds little kids riveted, yet their parents equally so: a sassy adaptation of the characters and elements of the story, plus an eclectic take on the music with everything from gospel through a hint of zany modernism to something edging towards Somewhere Over the Rainbow (and try the Wonderland…
  • Glamour time - are we listening or looking?

    24 Jul 2015 | 8:06 am
    I took part in a discussion for the US radio station WQXR's programme Conducting Business about playing the glamour card in classical music. Have a listen above.More info here.
  • Farewell to a wonderful clarinettist

    22 Jul 2015 | 11:25 pm
    The clarinettist John McCaw, always known personally as Jack, has died at the age of 96. He lived opposite us.We had no idea, when we moved to our house back in the last century, that he was there. Virtually every clarinettist I've come across since then had at some point been to our street for lessons with him. He was principal clarinet successively of the Philharmonia and of the London Philharmonic, many years ago (and would always watch with much amusement as Tom zoomed out of our front door with instrument case and raincoat to catch the train to Glyndebourne). He was well known as a…
  • Wigmore debut for remarkable young composer-pianist

    22 Jul 2015 | 10:53 am
    I was sent a CD by the young Israeli pianist and composer Matan Porat to review a couple of years ago and was mightily impressed (I called his playing "cool-tempered, intelligent and sophisticated"). The other day I heard - just one week before the event, of course - that he is making his Wigmore Hall debut on Sunday (26th). I can't go, annoyingly, but asked him for an e-interview. Here he is. Matan, where did you grow up, what is your background and how did you start to play?I grew up in a non-musical family. My mother loves music and as a toddler I learned to listen to LPs on my own,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Features - Classical MPR

  • New Classical Tracks: piano and cello collaboration

    4 Aug 2015 | 10:01 pm
    Stephen Hough and Steven Isserlis worked together on an album that showcases cello sonatas by composer pianists. Hear more about these Mendelssohn-Grieg-Hough Cello Sonatas, and enter for a chance to win a copy of the new album.
  • Flicks in Five: Alfred Hitchcock

    4 Aug 2015 | 3:45 pm
    Alfred Hitchcock arrived in Hollywood in the 1930s, and by the late 1950s, his nine-stroke pencil caricature had become internationally famous. In 1960, Hitch released of one of his best known films, 'Psycho'. On this week's Flicks in Five, Lynne Warfel will share some of Bernard Herrmann's unforgettable music from that soundtrack.
  • Every Day a New Beginning: Music in the Autism Spectrum

    4 Aug 2015 | 2:20 pm
    Jenn Deyo's six-year-old son, Abe, is on the autism spectrum. Classical music helps the entire family be more integrated. On this week's Music with Minnesotans, Jenn shares a playlist that's enjoyed by her whole family.
  • Help us rename 'Morning Glories'

    4 Aug 2015 | 6:20 am
    Morning Glories has been a daily feature on Classical MPR for years, and now we're giving it a makeover. Help us give Morning Glories a new name for its fresh start by sending us your ideas.
  • Learning to Listen: Lili Haydn

    3 Aug 2015 | 9:50 am
    Lili is also a Jill-of-all-trades, having initially gotten into scoring due to her successful solo recordings. In addition to being a fantastic violinist, Lili sings and scores. Hear her incredible journey to recovery thanks to Mendelssohn in the audio.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ionarts

  • À mon chevet: 'Go Set a Watchman'

    Charles T. Downey
    4 Aug 2015 | 9:04 am
    À mon chevet is a series of posts featuring a quote from whatever book is on my nightstand at the moment. Mr. Stone had pronounced the benediction and was on his way to the front door when she went down the aisle to corner Herbert, who had remained behind to shut the windows. Dr. Finch was faster on the draw: "--shouldn't sing it like that, Herbert," he was saying. "We are Methodists after all
  • Musical Heroes at Tanglewood

    Charles T. Downey
    3 Aug 2015 | 11:26 am
    We welcome this review from Tanglewood by guest contributor Seth Arenstein. Shostakovich, Symphony No. 10, Boston Symphony Orchestra, A. Nelsons (DG, 2015) When prominent soloists, cast in the role of musical heroes, overshadow a concert program, smaller pieces may receive less attention, perhaps even diminished rehearsal time. Fortunately the Boston Symphony Orchestra played all three works
  • Perchance to Stream: Santa Fe Edition

    Charles T. Downey
    2 Aug 2015 | 1:32 pm
    Here is your regular Sunday selection of links to online audio and online video from the week gone by. After clicking to an audio or video stream, you may need to press the "Play" button to start the broadcast. Some of these streams become unavailable after a few days. Listen to the performance of Wagner's Der fliegende Holländer, recorded at the Bayreuth Festival. [BR-Klassik] Kirill Petrenko
  • Production Photos from the Bregenz Festival's Turandot

    jfl
    2 Aug 2015 | 3:39 am
    It might merit confessing that I’m not all that hot about Puccini and that I suffer from a general deficiency in appreciating Italian opera. That said, I consider Turandot the best compromise as far as quality and popularity is concerned. Granted, I think that if it weren’t for Nessun dorma and one or two other greatest-hits moments and the ensuing grand popularity, nothing near the throngs of
  • Dip Your Ears, No. 202 (Schulhoff on the Piano)

    jfl
    1 Aug 2015 | 2:54 pm
    E.Schulhoff, Piano Works: Sonata No.2; Five Pittoresques op.31; Two Pieces; Music for Piano op.35; Esquisses de Jazz, Caroline Weichert Grand Piano E.Schulhoff, Sonatas Nos.1 & 3; Improvisations de Jazz; 5 Burlesques op.23; 5 Grotesques op.21; Five Pittoresques op.31; Ironies op.34 et al., M.Babinsky Phoenix UK | DE | FR Sonatas and other Rarities With deft tenacity, humor, and grit,
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Rambler

  • Female composers and “the new complexity”

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    Yesterday I had an interesting conversation on Twitter about the representation of female composers under the banner of “new complexity”. Or, rather, why it’s hard to think of any and who decides these things anyway. This is not, I should add, a conversation about the artistic merits of complexism, or about its usefulness as a … Continue reading →
  • Programme for Music We’d Like To Hear, 2015

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    18 Jun 2015 | 2:43 am
    Quickly reposting here, for those who may not have seen yet. As always, a fantastic programme. All three concerts look pretty unmissable. music we’d like to hear 2015 three concerts on three fridays curated by two composers this edition supported by the RVW Trust, the Hinrichsen Foundation and the Canada Council for the Arts I … Continue reading →
  • BBC SO’s 2015-16 season

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    17 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
    The BBC SO’s season brochure has just arrived at the door. I’ve griped about the apparent ongoing demise of the orchestra’s Total Immersion days at the Barbican – days devoted to the work of a single contemporary composer through (usually) two or three concerts, some talk, a film and one or two other items. But this … Continue reading →
  • Save our Sounds at the British Library

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    19 May 2015 | 10:48 pm
    Email received today from the British Library: On the 12th January, the British Library launched a new initiative titled Save our Sounds.  One of the key aims of this programme is to preserve as much as possible of the nation’s rare and unique sound recordings, not just those in the Library’s collections but also key … Continue reading →
  • #promsnewmusic 2015

    Tim Rutherford-Johnson
    24 Apr 2015 | 2:15 am
    It’s Proms announcement time again. See below for the definitive list of new music in this year’s festival, or follow  #promsnewmusic on Twitter. Some brief observations. Last year it was all about the birthdays of Sir Harrison Birtwistle and Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. This year it’s Pierre Boulez’s turn. I had a bit of moan last 12 months ago that … Continue reading →
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Soho the Dog

  • Something in the tune

    14 Jul 2015 | 11:11 am
    Tangent to the day's research: Jack Berger and His Hotel Astor Dance Orchestra's 1932 performance of "Something in the Night," with a vocal refrain by Jack Pearl, who was born Joshua Perelmuth, and who later changed his name to Jan Peerce.BONUS RELATED TANGENT TO TODAY'S RESEARCH:
  • Agonistes

    11 Jul 2015 | 5:33 pm
    In memoriam Jon Vickers, who forged inimitable dramatic steel from the physical and moral contests of opera.
  • Adventures in postdating

    10 Jul 2015 | 6:02 am
    It is time for the quarterly ritual of keeping this space on life support by at least linking to everything I've been doing elsewhere. That's three months of old-new articles to peruse (including a new batch of columns)—along with (as per usual) a compensatory drink:Slow WatchEqual parts:  lemon juice  Cynar  peach liqueur  ryeplus a healthy dash of orange bittersShake it up with small ice, strain into a rocks glass with big ice.Sip while reading good stuff elsewhere:Robin James on the privilege of post-genre and Attali and neo-liberalism.Ethan…
  • Hit the North

    1 Jul 2015 | 7:04 pm
    Reviewing Blair McMillen.Boston Globe, July 1, 2015.
  • Met the gazes, observed the spaces

    29 Jun 2015 | 7:03 pm
    Reviewing "Song Cycle" at the Peabody Essex Museum.Boston Globe, June 29, 2015.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Opera Today

  • Cold Mountain Wows Audience at Santa Fe World Premiere

    mnockin@icloud.com
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:12 pm
    On August 1, 2015, Santa Fe Opera presented the world premiere of Cold Mountain, a brand new opera composed by Pulizer Prize and Grammy winner Jennifer Higdon.
  • Review: You Promised Me Everything

    mnockin@icloud.com
    1 Aug 2015 | 1:42 pm
    Richard Taruskin entitled his 1988 polemical critique of the notion of ‘authenticity’ in the context of historically informed performance, ‘The Pastness of the Present and the Presence of the Past’.
  • Manon Lescaut, Munich

    mnockin@icloud.com
    1 Aug 2015 | 6:26 am
    Puccini’s Manon Lescaut at the Bayerische Staatsoper, Munich. Some will scream in rage but in its austerity it reaches to the heart of the opera.
  • Stefano Mastrangelo — An Italian in Japan

    mnockin@icloud.com
    31 Jul 2015 | 10:41 am
    I’m interviewing Stefano Mastrangelo in the immediate aftermath of his conducting La Traviata for the Chofu City Opera in Tokyo on 22 November 2014; he conveys an air at once of tiredness and exhilaration.
  • Proms Saturday Matinée 1

    mnockin@icloud.com
    27 Jul 2015 | 3:46 pm
    It might seem churlish to complain about the BBC Proms coverage of Pierre Boulez’s 90th anniversary. After all, there are a few performances dotted around — although some seem rather oddly programmed, as if embarrassed at the presence of new or newish music. (That could certainly not be claimed in the present case.)
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bass Blog

  • A Fantastic Fingering

    27 Jul 2015 | 2:54 pm
    Seeing a noted soloist return as a conductor is not often cause for high hopes, whether the transformation occurs after age has taken its toll on the playing, or in mid career, ennui, or an inflated ego has inflamed the desire to conquer a higher musical mountain. Although but a few steps, the journey between the soloist's spot at the footlights and the podium is a perilous road which has buried many a neophyte beneath an avalanche of overwhelming details, thrown many an overeager yet unprepared dilettante down into a hidden crevasse, or left many a dabbler dawdling along the crisscrossing…
  • Pray for Rain

    14 Jul 2015 | 10:34 am
     Since no summer of Bass Bloggery can go by without commentary on the season at Ravinia, it is time to take on the festival. “What are you doing home on a Saturday night?” one of my neighbors who knows what I do for a living asked during a recent impromptu front porch gathering, calling attention to the fact that in years past the rigors of my profession often forced me to eschew the warm weather social scene on our block. Happily, I could inform my neighbor since the {redacted}SO would only have three Saturday performances all summer, my attendance at future gatherings would be…
  • LOTR:TROTK

    8 Jun 2015 | 1:29 pm
    “Well, I'm back.” – Sam Gamgee   Sorry for the lengthy hiatus. For some of the time, I have a good excuse for not posting – I was away on sabbatical for a year – and for the rest of it, I have an even better one – general malaise, with a side of laziness. Thanks to those kindly who inquired as to the fate of the blog, and even in a few rare instances, my own well-being. The requests to have the blog start up again were all greatly appreciated and truly touching. Any fellow creeping along a high ledge, hearing the crowd below encouraging him to 'jump!' would be…
  • Return to Mordor

    14 Jul 2013 | 11:36 am
     A pattern seems to be evolving at Ravinia; begin the truncated summer session with a week of Christoph von Dohnányiand end with a week of Lord of the Rings. I'm not sure how many years the eighty-three-year-old maestro has left, but now that the LOTR folks have turned The Hobbit into a trilogy of films, we have five more to go. (If they tackle The Silmarillion, I'll probably throw myself under a train. If Ravinia ever makes us play LOTR, the musical, I might self immolate in the parking lot.)  Sometimes it feels as if Sauron himself takes a hand in scheduling during the summer…
  • Heart of Darkness

    24 Jun 2013 | 3:08 am
    The Rivers Festival came to an end on June 9th, although the onstage activities seemed to take a week off for a Haydn/Martinu/Scriabin program that had nothing to do with rivers, as far as I could tell. Music directors conduct what they want, when they want to, and the rest of the season kind of takes shape around that. However, among other things going on that week, there was some sort of outdoor concert which the MD took part in, and also a bunch of brass players went down the local river in a boat (He got a real pretty mouth ain't he? - insert your favorite quote from deliverance here. I…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Collaborative Piano Blog

  • Artist/Teacher Bios: A Look At Who's Doing It Right And Why

    Chris Foley
    27 Jul 2015 | 10:30 am
    I've had a lot of subsequent input from my article on rethinking artist bios. As a followup, I wanted to look at a few artists who are doing it right, why they are effective, and how artists can better frame their life in order to create a magnificent bio.First, the bio that is moving, compelling, and the best that I've seen. Here are the first few paragraphs from James Rhodes:James Rhodes had no formal academic musical education or dedicated mentoring until the age of 14 when he began to study with Colin Stone. In 1993, mental health issues stopped him taking up a scholarship to the…
  • Rethinking the Artist Bio

    Chris Foley
    26 Jul 2015 | 4:19 pm
    The best way to write a convincing online bio is to craft it in a concise manner, with a view towards who is reading about you.Nikki Loney writing in The Full Voice lays down the hard truth:A poorly written teaching bio can actually deter people from wanting to study with you.She continues:Shorter bios using “I”, “me” and “my” rather than stuffy third-person seem to be the trend now. This works better for online bios that tend to be more conversational and have a limited number of characters. Try including a “fun fact” about you to grab the reader’s attention. Remember, most…
  • Free Technical Requirements Charts Available for the 2015 RCM Piano Syllabus

    Chris Foley
    7 Jul 2015 | 6:37 pm
    Joy Morin over at Color In My Piano has assembled a fantastic free resource for teachers who will be using The Royal Conservatory's 2015 Piano Syllabus over the next few years: a PDF download with complete technical requirements charts for the new syllabus.This is by no means a unique resource, since each technical requirements book already contains a technical requirement chart. However, Joy's PDF will be an excellent on-the-go resource for students and teachers who need a quick reference while playing or teaching.
  • The Gryphon Trio's Elements Eternal is Available for Streaming on CBC Music Through July 13

    Chris Foley
    7 Jul 2015 | 6:14 pm
    The award-winning Gryphon Trio's latest album Elements Eternal features works of Brian Current, Michael Oesterle, and James Wright, whose Letters to the Immortal Beloved uses texts taken from Beethoven's still controversial Immortal Beloved letters found after his death. Here is an excerpt with the Gryphon Trio and mezzo soprano Julie Nesrallah: The entire Elements Eternal album is available to stream on the CBC Music site until July 13, and if you dig the Gryphons' latest work, please consider buying the CD or MP3.The Gryphon Trio are:Annalee Patipatanakoon,…
  • 10 Things You Need to Know About the 2015 Royal Conservatory Celebration Series and Piano Syllabus

    Chris Foley
    5 Jul 2015 | 7:42 pm
    Every seven to eight years, The Royal Conservatory revises their materials for their Celebration Series and Piano Syllabus, which provides the teaching materials for thousands of teachers and their students across North America. These books also provide the foundation of The Royal Conservatory's enormously popular examination system in Canada and the United States. The last revision of the series happened in 2008, so 2015 is the year that the materials are due for reissue in revised form.But this time it’s different.Much different. Rather than a small, incremental change, the 2015…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    parterre box

  • Less is Moor

    La Cieca
    4 Aug 2015 | 11:08 pm
    It’s official: in the Met’s new production of Otello, Aleksandrs Antonenko “will not use blackface makeup… breaking with a performance tradition of more than a century.” [New York Times]
  • The reel world

    Christopher Corwin
    4 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    I wasn’t expecting to learn tough life lessons from this experience but, boy, did I! Patience! Patience! It never occurred to me that each tape had to be individually dubbed or that others, maybe many, many others, might also be ordering tapes at the same time. I also hadn’t considered that maybe these guys (and, yes, they always were guys) might have had day jobs and couldn’t attend to tapes 24/7. So for our first weeks of togetherness, Sony and I got pretty lonely.   But I happily discovered that I could now record broadcasts without a microphone: my new-used machine had an…
  • The night they invented Champagne

    WindyCityOperaman
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    This day in 1693 is the date traditionally ascribed to Dom Perignon‘s invention of Champagne, although he actually did not have anything to do with sparkling wine.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qtl2wWpXe-4 Born on this day in 1875 composer Italo Montemezzi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hUcngNncBI Born on this day in 1884 librettist Béla Balázs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7zqNgta_cw Born on this day in 1910 composer William Schuman http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpZSr1pTR8c Born on this day in 1927 tenor Jess Thomas http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGPaH_X5QDY Happy 86th…
  • When monarchs unite, how happy their state

    La Cieca
    3 Aug 2015 | 9:29 pm
    Tony Award winners Kelli O’Hara (The King and I) and Victoria Clark (Gigi) will reunite onstage in a new production of the opera Dido and Aeneas, conducted by their frequent musical collaborator Ted Sperling with Orchestra of St. Luke’s. According to Theatermania, the production will play New York City Center for two nights only, April 28 and 29, 2016.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtZ8fNfGRwA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxTIJrk-9-4 Photo: Joan Marcus
  • “Venez-vous me mettre en bustier, cher auteur de mes maux?”

    La Cieca
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:45 pm
    “Few operas better represent a moment such as ours, when stability and long-held certainties are hard to come by, particularly in regard to sexuality.” [New York Times]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Naxos AudioBooks New Releases

  • HUME, D.: Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (An) (Unabridged) (NA0157)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
  • DE QUINCEY, T.: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (Unabridged) (NA0212)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Thomas De Quincey’s highly charged and hauntingly accurate account of laudanum addiction is considered the root of all drug novels. From Poe to Burroughs, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater influenced a variety of literary writers. After being prescribed the drug as pain relief for a chronic condition, De Quincey soon found himself compelled by the opium experience. His dreams are recounted here in every hallucinatory detail: threatening Roman armies, sunken cities, and German mountaintops… De Quincey’s vivid memories will evoke wonder and curiosity in the listener.
  • WILDE, O.: Profundis (De) (Unabridged) (NA0210)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Written during his time in Reading Gaol, De Profundis is Oscar Wilde’s moving letter to Lord Alfred Douglas, whose relationship with Wilde led to the poet’s imprisonment. Here Wilde repudiates Lord Alfred and reflects on his ordeal, acknowledging how the depths of his sorrow have helped liberate him towards a fuller, freer wisdom. Brimming with beautiful passages, De Profundis is a profound and inspiring treatise on the meaning of suffering.
  • LAWRENCE, D.H.: Rainbow (The) (Unabridged) (NA0192)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    D.H. Lawrence’s controversial classic, The Rainbow, follows the lives and loves of three generations of the Brangwen family, between 1840 and 1905. Their tempestuous relationships are played out against a backdrop of change as they witness the arrival of industrialisation—the only constant being their unending attempts to grasp a higher form of existence, symbolised by the persistent, unifying motif of the ‘rainbow’. Lawrence’s fourth novel, and the prequel to Women in Love, is an invigorating, absorbing tale about the undying determination of the human soul.
  • LE FANU, J.S.: In a Glass Darkly (Unabridged) (NA0213)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Demons, vengeful spirits, insanity, premature burials and lesbian vampires: In a Glass Darkly contains five diabolical tales of horror and mystery that will get the heart racing. Each story, including the famous Green Tea and Carmilla, is presented as a case from the posthumous papers of Dr Martin Hesselius, a metaphysical physician who has no doubt as to the existence of supernatural phenomena—unlike our anxious protagonists… These traditional yet unfamiliar tales were revered upon release, with Bram Stoker writing his own vampire story some twenty years later, and Henry James…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Naxos Historical New Releases

  • KREISLER, Fritz: Complete Recordings, Vol. 6 (1924-1925) (8.111400)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Volume 6 of this series completes Kreisler’s acoustic recordings for the Victor Talking Machine Company. The February 1925 sessions were the final months of acoustic recording techniques and, despite numerous takes, many of the sides were regrettably not passed for release. Fortunately an extremely rare test pressing of the Scherzando from Lalo’s Symphonie espagnole has survived (Track 19) as has an unpublished test pressing from 24 January 1924 of Take 2 of the Tchaikovsky Canzonetta (Track 1), which preserves Kreisler’s hauntingly ‘speaking’ tone and lovely…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Kenneth Woods- conductor

  • RIP Ivan Moravec

    Kenneth Woods
    2 Aug 2015 | 5:06 am
    It was with real sadness that I learned today of the passing of this pianist Ivan Moravec, a man who was widely recognised as one of the greatest pianists of his generation, but who never quite earned the fame or fortune his artistry merited. The many recordings he made are really treasures and well worth seeking out. I played with him once, as an orchestral cellist, in the Schumann Concerto. I’d never heard of him before and had no idea what to expect. He was the greatest and most compelling artist at the piano I’ve ever been on stage with, at least that week. His playing was infinitely…
  • BREAKING: Music Industry Shock as Leading Orchestra Appoints Conductor Based on Skill at Conducting

    Kenneth Woods
    17 Jul 2015 | 8:33 am
    The music industry reacted with wide-eyed amazement this month as the world’s leading orchestra announced they were appointing someone to the prestigious position of Principal Conductor based on his ability to conduct. Across Europe, North America and the Far East, orchestral managers, agents, musicians and music lovers expressed genuine shock at the news that a conductor, Kirill Petrenko, had been hired solely on merit, for possibly the first time in recent memory, to conduct the Berlin Philharmonic, considered by many to be the world’s greatest orchestra. News of Petrenko’s…
  • On The Health Benefits of Head Banging

    Kenneth Woods
    11 Jul 2015 | 2:42 am
    A study on the life arcs of 1980’s-era heavy metal fans has been making the news this week, and its main conclusion is no surprise to me: In fact, researchers find that former metal fans “were significantly happier in their youth, and better adjusted currently” compared to their peers who preferred other musical genres, and to a parallel group of current college students.” More self-described metal-heads* went on to become “ “middle-class, gainfully employed, relatively well-educated”  adults than their peers who listened to or identified with other music at…
  • Four for the Fourth

    Kenneth Woods
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:42 am
    I gave up a long time ago on trying to find much meaning or substance in music for patriotic occasions. We live an age of such small-minded, parochial jingoism that thinking of any music in terms of nationalist celebrations seems only to cheapen the music. This year I got thinking that maybe it’s gotten so bad that it’s time to fight back. Leaving music out of the discussion seems to only encourage the triumphalist nitwits. A day like the Fourth of July ought to be a moment for reflection as well as celebration. We ought to take at least a moment to think about the nation’s…
  • Malcolm MacDonald on Brahms opus 26

    Kenneth Woods
    25 Jun 2015 | 2:41 am
    Rehearsals have been going well for this weekend’s performance of my arrangement of the Brahms A major Piano Quartet for orchestra in Guildford. For some reason, the A major has always been the least played of the Brahms Piano Quartets. I’m sure it’s absolutely epic scale puts some groups off, but I know many of my chamber music colleagues seem to feel it’s a weaker piece than either the G minor or C minor, or, for that matter, the much more famous Piano Quintet. I’ve always loved the piece, and spending so much one-on-one time with it lately has really made me…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Iron Tongue of Midnight

  • Hector Berlioz Will Live Into the 24th Century

    31 Jul 2015 | 12:32 pm
    We know this because a few minutes into Star Trek: First Contact, Jean-Luc Picard, far from home, is listening to Ryland Davies sing "Vallon sonore."h/t Steve Hicken for pointing this out to me.
  • London Friday Photo

    31 Jul 2015 | 12:01 am
    Urban GardeningLondon, May 2014
  • Vic Firth

    29 Jul 2015 | 6:56 pm
    Vic Firth, the legendary principal timpanist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and also a legendary manufacturer of drumsticks of all kinds, died the other day. Here are the obits I have seen:Jeremy Eichler in the GlobeMargalit Fox in the TimesFor once, I think Fox, who is usually a genius, put her emphasis in the wrong place, with more about Firth-the-entrepreneur and less about Firth-the-genius timpanist.
  • Somebody Caught This Before I Could Report It.

    28 Jul 2015 | 1:33 pm
    A correction posted at the NY Times, at the bottom of a fascinating story about the discovery of human remains at Jamestown, Virginia:Correction: July 28, 2015 An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly, on second references, to Sir Ferdinando Wainman and Sir Thomas West. They are Sir Ferdinando and Sir Thomas, not Sir Wainman and Sir West.I was surprised that "Sir Wainman" and "Sir West" got through. It is not common knowledge that certain British titles take the title holder's first name, not last, but I figured that the Times's copy-editors would know this. For…
  • Metropolitan Opera Cast Change: More Keenlyside Withdrawals

    28 Jul 2015 | 9:31 am
    Received from the Met, and as worrisome as Simon Keenlyside's withdrawal from the NYPO premiere of Totentanz in the spring:George Gagnidze and Željko Lučić will share the title role of Verdi’s Rigoletto at the Met this fall, replacing Simon Keenlyside, who is taking a necessary period of vocal rest for much of the year and temporarily removing the role of Rigoletto from his repertoire. Gagnidze will sing the first seven performances of the opera, while Lučić—already scheduled to sing the December performances of the run—will also sing Rigoletto on November 13,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Musical Assumptions

  • For Your Mozart Pleasure: A Lovely K330

    2 Aug 2015 | 5:03 pm
  • Why Playing the Piano Is Like Riding a Bicycle

    31 Jul 2015 | 7:13 am
    The other day I saw a video about learning to ride a bicycle that has been adjusted so that the front wheel turns left when the rider turns it to the right. If you haven't seen it, it is well worth 8 minutes. If you don't have 8 minutes, the gist of the film clip is that learning to ride a bicycle is an activity that requires a specific set of left-right balances. Once you learn those specific balances, they become unconscious. The person in this film clip taught his young son to ride a backwards-engineered bicycle, and he did so with the same degree of difficulty he would have learned to…
  • Gilligan's Hamlet

    29 Jul 2015 | 2:12 pm
    These were the original words as far as I was concerned, because it was on Gilligan's Island more than 40 years ago that I heard these melodies for the first time. I saw this episode only once and somehow all the words have remained vividly etched in my brain (though the images were only in black and white). I had no idea what Hamlet was, or why this would be parody. I thought it was just a nice treat for those of us who faithfully watched the show.
  • Summer Music, Einmal Anders

    29 Jul 2015 | 7:33 am
    I wrote Summer Music for violin and piano in June of 2009. My friend Jennifer Paull asked me to make a transcription of it for oboe d'amore and piano, and yesterday I came across this recording of it on YouTube played on electronic instrument called the EW1.This performance by Gorden Gunzelman is so expressive that it is hard to believe it is being played on an electronic instrument (or two electronic instruments, since there is also a piano part). Since the world of electronic wind controllers is new to me, I had to do a bit of investigation. I learned that these wind controllers have been…
  • Imaginary Venn Diagram: Sewing Intersecting with Composing

    27 Jul 2015 | 1:06 pm
    I have dismally failed at making a Venn diagram to illustrate the phenomenon I have been experiencing these last few days, so words will have to suffice.A couple of weeks ago I made a post about the "Supreme State of Sew," and since that time I have been alternating between sewing and writing a piece for string quartet. The piece for string quartet is a set of variations on a theme that I wrote many years ago (at least 10), and have used before, but not in a piece for string quartet. The sewing I have been doing is similar in spirit. I have been taking old pieces of clothing that no longer…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    eighth blackbird » Blog

  • Hand Eye premiere and recording

    Yvonne
    20 Jul 2015 | 7:45 am
    Taking a break in the IV Lab lounge   We headed to Great Lakes a few weeks ago to finally premiere the full acoustic version of Hand Eye on the closing concert of the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival. Ted Hearne, Jacob Cooper, Andrew Norman, and Christopher Cerrone were able to be there with us and offer valuable feedback (and last-minute changes) during our rehearsals. After playing it through at home in our studio, we decided that it needed an intermission, and that intermission perhaps necessitated a slight change in the order of the pieces. If you ever wondered how the six of us in…
  • Olagon

    Yvonne
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:22 am
    Last month we had another fun and productive workshop week for Olagon. Dan and Iarla joined us in the studio with some new music and mockups to try out. We were missing Michael, who was on the other side of the world playing with Hong Kong Philharmonic, but our new flutist Nathalie was able to fly in for the week and spitball with us while juggling apartment searching appointments. Dan had fleshed out some earlier sketches, adding sections and filling out the orchestration. I had brought my older Olagon materials from our last workshop, and it was fascinating to see the evolution of thought…
  • eighth blackbird joins Matt Ulery and Active Child in Millennium Park’s “Downtown Sound” music series

    Michael
    18 Jun 2015 | 7:37 am
    The post eighth blackbird joins Matt Ulery and Active Child in Millennium Park’s “Downtown Sound” music series appeared first on eighth blackbird.
  • For immediate release – Celebrate Brooklyn

    Michael
    15 Jun 2015 | 6:02 am
    The post For immediate release – Celebrate Brooklyn appeared first on eighth blackbird.
  • Position Opportunity – Director of Development

    Michael
    19 May 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Full job description below. The post Position Opportunity – Director of Development appeared first on eighth blackbird.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    an unamplified voice

  • Apollo

    JSU
    15 Jul 2015 | 9:03 pm
    Daphne - Cleveland Orchestra, 7/15/2015Hangler, Schager, Ernst, Maultsby, Anger / Welser-MöstRemember the city's last notable concert presentation of Strauss, wherein Andris Nelsons and the Vienna Philharmonic brought not only a triumphant account of Salome, but revelatory new soprano Gun-Brit Barkmin in the title role? Well, this show wasn't really like that. An excellent night at the opera? Yes. Instant stardom? Not for the soprano, anyway...Regine Hangler isn't, mind you, bad: in fact she has just about the right voice for Daphne, a sort of oversized clearish lyric instrument that…
  • Off topic: the sleeping prince's awakening

    JSU
    25 Jun 2015 | 1:34 pm
    It's been five years since I wrote more than a line here about this publication's official off-topic topic: ABT's Veronika Part.In that time, all too many of Part's lead performances have been dragged down by the use of New York native and recentish (2011) principal Cory Stearns as her primary ABT partner. As absent as she was present, as callow as she was wholly formed, Stearns -- whose actual steps and jumps, to be fair, have certainly gained focus -- left the balletic tragedienne little-or-nothing to work with. Most of her successes have been in her irregular pairings with Gomes, Bolle, et…
  • Hvorostovsky has a brain tumor

    JSU
    24 Jun 2015 | 8:55 pm
    This sounds very bad. Let's hope for the best.
  • A Verdi soprano

    JSU
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:50 pm
    I wanted to wait until I finished a full review of the several Don Carlo performances I've seen in the past weeks, but that may take a while to get to. So, a quick word on Wednesday night's house debut of Lianna Haroutounian.Simply put, she is a real Verdi soprano -- already the most exciting and appropriate in these middle-weight parts besides Sondra Radvanovsky (who has other mountains to climb next season). Haroutounian is not yet (and may never be) the tragedienne Barbara Frittoli is and was as Elisabetta, but from start to finish the scope and physical thrill of her voice was revelatory,…
  • The suitors

    JSU
    30 Mar 2015 | 2:00 pm
    I've been absent for a while, so let's go backwards.Ernani - Metropolitan Opera, 3/20/2015Meli, Meade, Domingo, Belosselskiy / LevineThe presence of superstar tenor turned embarrassingly amateur conductor turned hit-and-miss baritone Placido Domingo is no longer the most notable thing about a production. But perhaps he catalyzed what struck me so strongly on this night: the palpable attention, long familiar here but absent from shows I've seen this season, of the Met audience that recognized itself as such. The sounds and silences (and you can sense it best in the quiet) of a crowd sure in…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    On An Overgrown Path

  • One picture is worth a thousand words

    4 Aug 2015 | 4:10 am
    That photo* of Ture Rangström will probably do more to bring his music to a wider audience than anything I can write. However I will offer some nuanced advocacy, but keep it to considerably less than one thousand words. Ture Rangström was born in Stockholm in 1884 and died in 1947. He came to composing late and did not have a formal musical training, although Hans Pfitzner was among those who he turned to for guidance. At the age of 26 he was awarded the Swedish state composer's scholarship and Jean Sibelius considered him "head and shoulders above any other Swedish composer". The young…
  • Music at the edge of the network

    2 Aug 2015 | 9:08 am
    An old tech adage tells how intelligence moves to the edge of the network. So I propose a new aphorism that in the music industry, as celebrity and money migrates to the centre of the network, so intelligence in the form of creativity and innovation moves to the edge. My recent travels on the network edge have taken me to Milton Keynes to hear Andalusian Sufi music from the Al Firdaus Ensemble, and this weekend to the Southburgh Festival deep in rural Norfolk to hear Gambian kora virtuosos Sefo Kanuteh - see photo - and to take part in a sacred drumming workshop. This summer it was my…
  • New music livens up industry award shortlist

    31 Jul 2015 | 6:35 am
    Very good to see new music in the form of the above CD making the Gramophone Concerto Award shortlist alongside hardy perennials form Bruch, Beethoven et al. At the time of the 2010 premiere of James MacMillan's Oboe Concerto I interviewed soloist Nicholas Daniel together with James MacMillan who conducted the Britten Sinfonia in both the premiere performances and the recording. That interview can be heard on SoundCloud via this link. As well as discussing the music, the interview touches on some familiar Overgrown Path themes including the links between music and spirituality. Nick Daniel…
  • Sound yoga - ancient wisdom or New Age nonsense?

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:50 am
    Classical music cannot stand still; so that means it must find new audiences. Western classical music has evolved into a highly dualist art form with clearly demarcated boundaries around its core offering of the orchestral and operatic repertoire. There is little debate that this repertoire must - and will - remain central to the art form. But it can be argued that to open up new markets the current watertight boundaries around that core offering must become porous. An example of a blurring of these boundaries would be an entry into the mind, body and spirit market; a market which a post here…
  • What classical music can learn from John Coltrane

    29 Jul 2015 | 1:12 am
    Western classical music has evolved into a highly dualist art form with strict differentiations between masterpiece/minorpiece, celebrity/nobody, young/ageing, prestigious/unimportant, contemporary/mainstream, acclaimed/insignificant, classical/non-classical etc etc. It is my proposition that this rigid dualism erects barriers to engagement with both new and existing audiences. Central to duality is the process of objectifying. This dissects the seamless flow of music making into objects, each with a discrete form delineated by clear boundaries - celebrity conductor, anniversary composer,…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Naxos New Releases

  • MÁSSON, A.: Clarinet Music - Blik / Sonatina / Seasons / 3 Bagatelles / Fantasia / Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano / Wind Quintet (Jóhannesson) (9.70238)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Áskell Másson’s unique and distinctive expressive fingerprints are nowhere better encountered than in his music for clarinet, here played by his great champion Einar Jóhannesson. Blik explores diverse clarinet techniques, not least multiphonics, and continues to be one of his best-loved works whilst the Sonatina evokes sombre darkness as well as blithe lyricism. The unusual Seasons features the Darabuka, or Goblet Drum. The Trio for clarinet, cello and piano was written as a companion piece for Beethoven’s Clarinet Trio, Op. 11 and is a haunting dream-dialogue…
  • POLEDOURIS, B.: Conan the Barbarian (arr. P. Pelster for organ) (Pelster) (8.573444)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Director and co-writer John Milius’s intention with the 1982 adventure Conan the Barbarian was to create an opera in the form of film. With its power, energy and moments of tenderness, Basil Poledouris’s music supports the storyline in a similar way to a work written for the stage. The superb Glatter-Götz/Rosales organ in Claremont, California was designed to inspire creativity and innovation, and Philipp Pelster’s vision in making a complete film-score transcription especially for the unique possibilities of this instrument transforms the orchestral colours of the…
  • BERGER, R.: Pathetique / Epilogue (Omaggio a L. v. B.) / Piano Sonata No. 3 / Impromptu / Allegro frenetico con reminiscenza (The Berger Trio) (8.573406)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Award-winning composer and music theoretician Roman Berger is widely respected for his stand against political repression in Eastern Europe during the last century. Most of the works on this recording are dedicated to the members of The Berger Trio, one of Slovakia’s leading ensembles. They include a commemoration of the composer’s late wife and other aspects of parting. The composer himself has written ‘…for me expressionism is neither a style nor an aesthetic, nor an “anachronistic” fashion: it is the result of life experience. The drama of existence…
  • MEYER, K.: Piano Quartet / Piano Quintet (Sałajczyk, Silesian String Quartet) (8.573357)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    The twin series of symphonies and string quartets stand at the centre of Krzysztof Meyer’s achievement as one of the most renowned composers of our time. His mastery of the chamber medium is also revealed in the two works presented here. The Piano Quartet, Op. 112, heard here in its world première recording, is unusual in Meyer’s output for its one-movement structure with several contrasting sections. Elegy, threnody and caprice co-exist in an intense interplay of great passion. In its scale and impact the Piano Quintet recalls similar such pieces dating back to Brahms.
  • CHIN, Gordon Shi-Wen: Cello Concerto No. 1 / Symphony No. 3, `Taiwan` (Wen-Sinn Yang, Taiwan Philharmonic, Shao-Chia Lü) (8.570615)

    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Gordon Chin is one of Taiwan’s leading composers, and increasingly honoured by commissions and performances from major ensembles in North America, Asia and Europe. Featuring an array of exotic Chinese percussion instruments, Symphony No. 3 ‘Taiwan’ is a dramatically powerful work cast in three movements which explore his native country’s turbulent history. Specific literary quotations from Shakespeare, Blaise Pascal and Samuel Johnson elucidate the expressive moods of the three-movement Cello Concerto No. 1.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Naxos Blog

  • Summer seasoning

    Naxos-FC
    31 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    As July turns to August many of us will be enjoying the sunshine and thinking of vacations past and present. For music lovers, few melodies conjure the languid spirit of the season as effectively as Summertime by George Gershwin, from his 1934 opera Porgy and Bess (8.110287-88) which is, paradoxically, a tale of hardship and suffering: Summertime, and the livin’ is easy, Fish are jumpin’ and the cotton is high, Oh, your daddy’s rich and your ma is good-lookin’, So hush little baby, don’t you cry. Here’s a reminder of the melody in an arrangement for clarinet quartet (8.557407).
  • Podcast: The Mannheim school legacy – The symphonies of F.I. Beck

    Naxos-FC
    24 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    Franz Ignaz Beck (1734–1809) was a member of the Mannheim school of composers, based at the court of Mannheim in the mid-18th century. The Mannheim orchestra was one of the largest and finest in Europe, and the Mannheim school’s spearheading of developments in orchestral style, technique and expression influenced symphonic composers during the rest of the 18th century and well into the nineteenth, including Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. This new Naxos release features the Thirteen Strings Chamber Orchestra conducted by Kevin Mallon in Beck’s Op. 2 set of six symphonies. In this podcast,…
  • Making connections

    Naxos-FC
    17 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    The 2015 BBC Promenade Concerts, the world’s largest music festival based at London’s Royal Albert Hall, kick off this week and run for the next two months. The first four weeks of performances sport a wealth of exciting music, opening on July 17 with Walton’s big-boned Belshazzar’s Feast (8.555869) and closing with Messiaen’s Turangalila Symphony (8.554478-79) on August 13, a momentous piece to mark the festival’s halfway milestone. The programming is eclectic: the fare during the first four weeks is book-ended by Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 and John Foulds’ Three Mantras.
  • Podcast: Liszt’s musical makeovers

    Naxos-FC
    10 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    From composer to transcriber to performer—less instantaneous than modern transmissions, but it’s how many works first came to be known by music lovers before the dawn of the age of technology. Around half of Liszt’s 800 compositions were transcriptions of other composers’ works. In this week’s podcast Raymond Bisha introduces pianist Sergio Gallo breezing through virtuoso transcriptions by Franz Liszt of music by opera composer Giacomo Meyerbeer, from Vol. 40 in Naxos’ ongoing cycle of Liszt’s Complete Piano Music. Album details… Catalogue No.: 8.573235
  • Podcast: The latest from the Canadian Classics series

    Naxos-FC
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    Canada’s Gryphon Trio was established in 1993 and its founding members remain the same to this day. Indefatigable as performers, teachers and administrators at institutions around Canada, the trio has commissioned over 75 new works since its inception. Raymond Bisha explores their latest recording of works by four distinguished Canadian composers: Brian Current, Andrew Staniland, Michael Oesterle and James K. Wright. Album details… Catalogue No.: 8.573533
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical CD Reviews

  • Mozart: Stolen Beauties. Songs of Love War and Melancholy Anneke Scott

    Gavin Dixon
    17 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> Mozart Stolen Beauties: Chamber Music by Mozart, Punto and Michael Haydn Ironwood with Anneke Scott ABC 481 1244 Buy from: Songs of Love
  • Firsova A Triple Portrait Marsyas Trio

    Gavin Dixon
    18 Jun 2015 | 3:40 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]-->Elena Firsova: Hommage to Canisy. Lost Vision. A Triple Portrait. Night Songs. Spring Sonata. For Slava. Meditation in the Japanese Garden. Three Poems of Osip
  • Alfred Schnittke Film Music Edition Strobel

    Gavin Dixon
    8 May 2015 | 2:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • MAHLER Symphony No. 4 Manning RCS Chamber Ensemble

    Gavin Dixon
    27 Apr 2015 | 9:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Raffi Besalyan: The Return

    Gavin Dixon
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical CD Reviews

  • Mozart: Stolen Beauties. Songs of Love War and Melancholy Anneke Scott

    17 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> Mozart Stolen Beauties: Chamber Music by Mozart, Punto and Michael Haydn Ironwood with Anneke Scott ABC 481 1244 Buy from: Songs of Love
  • Firsova A Triple Portrait Marsyas Trio

    18 Jun 2015 | 3:40 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]-->Elena Firsova: Hommage to Canisy. Lost Vision. A Triple Portrait. Night Songs. Spring Sonata. For Slava. Meditation in the Japanese Garden. Three Poems of Osip
  • Alfred Schnittke Film Music Edition Strobel

    8 May 2015 | 2:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • MAHLER Symphony No. 4 Manning RCS Chamber Ensemble

    27 Apr 2015 | 9:34 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Raffi Besalyan: The Return

    17 Apr 2015 | 7:37 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Grand Piano Passion™

  • Why Pianists Need Musicians’ Earplugs

    Nancy M. Williams, Founding Editor
    20 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    All musicians, including pianists, should invest in a set of custom musicians’ earplugs and keep them on hand for hearing protection in loud environments.
  • Playing Scared: Getting Over Stage Fright

    Guest Writer
    6 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    An adult pianist who suffered from stage fright since childhood, Sara Solovitch, author of Playing Scared, decides to take her performance anxiety head on.
  • How to Find the Right Audiologist: Service, Service, Service

    Nancy M. Williams, Founding Editor
    23 Jun 2015 | 9:00 am
    A musician with hearing loss offers tips on how to find the right audiologist for your needs—such as custom hearing aid settings for playing and performing.
  • The Chopin Prelude in A Major Amplified

    Cosmo Buono, Special Contributing Writer
    8 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
    The Chopin Prelude in A Major is a very short piece that offers a wonderful study in dynamics, color, and rubato. Find tips on how to achieve these effects.
  • Why I’m Going to the HLAA Convention

    Nancy M. Williams, Founding Editor
    11 May 2015 | 2:00 am
    As she gets ready to attend the HLAA convention, Nancy M. Williams reflects on how freeing it is to be part of this community of people with hearing loss.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical Music Headphones

  • Sennheiser HD700 Headphones Review

    Matthew Simpson
    31 Jul 2015 | 2:53 pm
    Inroducing the Sennheiser HD700’s Sennheiser’s latest premium set of headphones are being touted as a ‘mid-way point’ between the Sennheiser’s flagship HD800’s and the HD650’s. At $999 $519.99, the HD700’s come at a steep price, although $1,000 cheaper than the HD800’s. After spending some time with the HD700’s, I believe that these headphones would stand The post Sennheiser HD700 Headphones Review appeared first on Classical Music Headphones.
  • Best Headphone Amp for Sennheiser HD800

    matthewsimpso
    31 Jul 2015 | 1:50 pm
    Best Headphone Amp for Sennheiser HD800 Like I previously mentioned in my review of the Sennheiser HD800 Headphones, owning the HD800 headphones is like living with a genius: the headphones will give you a new appreciation of all your favorite music. But the downside of that is that the HD800’s will reveal everything about your The post Best Headphone Amp for Sennheiser HD800 appeared first on Classical Music Headphones.
  • Best Headphones for Kids

    matthewsimpso
    31 Jul 2015 | 12:31 pm
    Best Headphones for Kids Welcome to our round-up of the best headphones for kids. As any parent can tell you, children are complex creatures, and they change fast. That’s why this list considers different age groups when recommending headphones. You don’t want to send your nine year old to school in headphones made for toddlers! The post Best Headphones for Kids appeared first on Classical Music Headphones.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Classical Commentary: Barry Lenson's Classical Music Blog

  • Remembering Jon Vickers

    Barry Lenson
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:00 am
    So much has been written about the titanic tenor Jon Vickers since he died a few weeks ago. What can I possibly add to everything that has been said about him?I’m not sure that I can add any new insights about this monumental artist, except to offer some personal reflections about times that I saw him perform.A Concert Performance of Fidelio in Montreal When I was a student in Montreal in the early 1970s, I went to a concert performance of Fideliowith the Montreal Symphony.  The cast was made up of very capable local singers from Quebec. They accorded themselves very capably in the…
  • Getting Opinions Out of My Ears . . . or how I stopped thinking and enjoyed Wagner

    Barry Lenson
    11 Jun 2015 | 6:24 am
    “ If you wish to see truth, then hold no opinions for or against anything. The struggle of what you like and what you dislike is the disease of the mind.” - Hsin Shin Ming, “The Great Way”A few days ago I sat down to write a post about Richard Wagner. I planned to write something like this:Wagner’s early operas grew out of the German supernatural operas of Marschner and Weber . . . Wagner’s operas Tannhuser, Lohengrin and die fliegende Hollnder are in a line with those earlier works . . . at a certain point, Wagner got infatuated with the writings of Schopenhauer and Kant and…
  • Unlimited Music Online vs. My Old Record Collection

    Barry Lenson
    23 May 2015 | 5:05 am
    I promise that I am not going to write a post today about how wonderful things used to be when I was young and how awful they are today.  You wouldn’t want to read that kind of BS and frankly, I’m not interested in writing about it either.What I do want to write about, however, is how today’s streaming and video access to classical music – all we could want, anytime – is changing the way people encounter classical music for the first time. And of course, how they continue to interact with it over the course of their lives. Is the “new order” better or worse than the old? I…
  • Earth, Wind & Fire and Baroque Performance Norms

    Barry Lenson
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:24 am
    A while ago I really enjoyed Les Intouchables, a charming French sidekick movie about an unlikely friendship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic man and Dris, his African-born physical therapist. The theme music for the film is “September,” a song by the band Earth, Wind & Fire. And then later in the movie comes a feel-good scene when Dris leads a group of staid Parisians as they dance to "Boogie Wonderland," another song from Earth Wind & Fire. It’s fun, right? I have to admit that until I saw that movie, I had hardly heard of Earth Wind & Fire.  I guess that…
  • Did George Gershwin Orchestrate his Own Compositions? And Should We Care?

    Barry Lenson
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:40 am
    Back when I was in conservatory, I heard lots of students and faculty members dismiss George Gershwin (1897-1938) on the grounds that, “He couldn’t even orchestrate his own compositions.”I was reminded of that opinion the other day when I was listening on my car radio to “Catfish Row,” an orchestral suite from Gershwin’s opera Porgy and Bess. Boy, are those melodies wonderful. Boy, is that orchestration good. But I was unsettled to realize that the orchestration of that work simply sounds a lot different from that of An American in Paris,which has been getting a lot of air time…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stars & Catz » Classical Music & Opera Buzz

  • Clarinetist Anthony McGill and Composer & Performer Daniel Bernard Roumain Join Board of Directors of League of American Orchestras + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    4 Aug 2015 | 2:15 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   When monarchs unite, how happy their state – parterre.com Tony Award winners Kelli O’Hara (The King and I) and Victoria Clark (Gigi) will reunite onstage in a new production of the opera Dido and Aeneas, conducted by their frequent musical collaborator Ted Sperling with Orchestra of St. Luke’s. According […]
  • Prohaska/Arcangelo/Cohen – Lachrimae, 2 August 2015 + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:44 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   BBC Philharmonic Orchestra/Alina Ibragimova, BBC Proms, Royal Albert Hall, London — review – www.ft.com Two Proms presented a contrast between awesome Romantic grandeur and solo intimacy Continue Reading On www.ft.com » Orchestra manager is made an honest man – www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc We are delighted to report the weekend wedding of […]
  • An Excellent, Often Searching Recital from Sarah Connolly and Joseph Middleton + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    2 Aug 2015 | 1:13 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Dominique-René de Lerma: Musical America: The Question Of Opera in America, Answers From 1915 – africlassical.blogspot.com Dominique-René de LermaOn 24 July 1915, Musical America carried the following item — entitled “How can we make opera an American institution?” — by Dr. P. J. Grant, a music lover and journalist […]
  • Handel's Serse from Longborough's young artists + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    1 Aug 2015 | 12:43 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   When Lang Lang rang my bell, looking for a piano – www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc This from our friend Erica Worth, editor of Pianist magazine. Here’s more. Continue Reading On www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc » Classical Notes: American Bach Soloists to present a rare performance of Marin Marais' 'Semele' – www.mercurynews.com ‘Semele’ untouched for some […]
  • Chairman’s Choice: Klaus Heymann spotlights some of August’s new releases (Aug 01, 2015) + MORE

    Oliver Braithwaite
    31 Jul 2015 | 12:14 pm
      Today’s News & Buzz   Chairman’s Choice: Klaus Heymann spotlights some of August’s new releases (Aug 01, 2015) – www.naxos.com SIBELIUS Pélleas & Mélisande, Musik zu einer Szene, Autrefois, Valse Chevaleresque Pajala, Nordqvist, Turku Philharmonic, Segerstam Naxos 8.573301 This is the third in our six-volume collection of orchestral works by Jean Sibelius that fall […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News Source. Est 2009.

  • Violinist David Garrett Withdraws from London Proms Without Reason

    admin
    3 Aug 2015 | 11:19 am
    German violinist David Garrett has today announced, via social media he has withdrawn from his scheduled performance at the BBC Proms in the Park concert, in London on September 12th. No reason for the cancellation was given. “Dear Fans! Unfortunately, due to various reasons, David is no longer performing at Proms in the Park in September. However, he hopes to come over to the UK in the near future! We are sorry!” the facebook post has stated. The performance was scheduled to take place in London’s Hyde Park with the BBC Concert Orchestra – with appearances by…
  • MANIC MONDAY | Making a Clarinet From a Carrot in Under 5 Minutes [VIDEO]

    admin
    2 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Australian woodwind instrument maker Linsey Pollak’s amazing TEDx Sydney presentation last month – on how in a mere 5 minutes one can use a carrot, saxophone mouthpiece and drill to make something really rather cool. TEDx SYDNEY | LINSEY POLLAK | TURNING A CARROT INTO A CLARINET The post MANIC MONDAY | Making a Clarinet From a Carrot in Under 5 Minutes [VIDEO] appeared first on The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News Source. Est 2009..
  • VC GIVEAWAY | Win 1 of 5 VC ‘Artist’ Jennifer Pike ‘Bach to Moog’ Violin/Synthesizer CDs

    admin
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:57 pm
    To help celebrate the international release, The Violin Channel in conjunction in with Sony Classical is this week giving away 5 VC ‘Artist’ Jennifer Pike ‘Bach to Moog’ CDs. Released to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the iconic large format modular synthesizer, each disc presents selections from J.S. Bach violin works – accompanied by the Moog Modular 55. Enter to Win: http://s.heyo.com/75cfce Entries Close: 8th August, 2015. The post VC GIVEAWAY | Win 1 of 5 VC ‘Artist’ Jennifer Pike ‘Bach to Moog’ Violin/Synthesizer CDs appeared…
  • Borodin String Quartet ‘Shostakovich’ CD Giveaway Winners Announced!

    admin
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:32 pm
    And the winners are in! The following 5 lucky VC members will each be receiving a fresh-off-the-press autographed copy of the Borodin String Quartet‘s ‘Shostakovich’ CD – courtesy of Decca. Newly-released, each disc contains Shostakovich’s String Quartets No. 1, 8 and 14. Brea Low from the United States Crystal Ferguson from Australia Anja Aguilar from Belgium Ariana Mendes  from the United States Nelson Chiu from Hong Kong Congratulations to our winners and please stay tuned for more exciting VC Giveaways! The post Borodin String Quartet ‘Shostakovich’ CD Giveaway Winners…
  • AUDITION | Seattle Symphony, United States – ‘Concertmaster’ Position

    admin
    1 Aug 2015 | 10:10 am
    The Seattle Symphony is currently accepting applications for the ‘Concertmaster’ position. Applications to be received by August 21st, 2015. For further details, visit: http://bit.ly/1MqAzl3 The post AUDITION | Seattle Symphony, United States – ‘Concertmaster’ Position appeared first on The Violin Channel | World's Leading Classical Music News Source. Est 2009..
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stephen P Brown

  • #PsalmQuest 48 research

    SPB
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:28 pm
    “Psalm 30″ by John Stuart The next psalm in my quest is number 30. There are lots of famous songs, poems and artworks inspired by this psalm, so let’s find out what it’s about: Click here to read Psalm 30 John Stuart (Scottish artist) titles his visual representation of psalm 30 simply “Psalm 30” Click here to read Frank McEleny’s poem based on psalm 30. R.E.O White titles his narrative on this psalm “Beauty for Ashes.” Longman and Garland call their commentary “Praise for God’s Faithfulness in a Time of Need” and…
  • No more updates?

    SPB
    23 Jul 2015 | 5:22 am
    Hello. Just a quick note to say there will be no more daily #PsalmQuest progress updates. I am spending a great deal of time away from composing in order to write and prepare them and am falling behind schedule as a result. Over the next couple of weeks the premium plan will transition to a free plan and you will be notified when each new #PsalmQuest composition is available. Thanks for your support and encouragement so far – almost 1/3 of the way through! Best wishes, Stephen  
  • #PsalmQuest 47 progress 6: repetition

    SPB
    17 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
      For years I have marveled at the pop music culture, as it exists purely on the basis of repetition. Radio stations play the same songs over and over for six weeks. Artists perform the same program day after day for a year or two. Pop songs themselves repeat a chorus multiple times within a three-minute time span. Then it occurred to me: So does classical music. My recent listening has noticed how repetition is rampant since the time of Mozart and Haydn, and that most compositions consist of the same music repeated a little differently. Here it is with the oboes, and then there they…
  • Withhold no more your unparalleled true colors

    SPB
    17 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
      “I can’t use you. You may be a genius but you’re not weird enough. You are too normal. You’re too nice.” Have you ever received feedback like that? Actually, you probably have, but maybe not quite so in-your-face Simon Cowell style. Such an assessment of talent and skill has little to do with either talent or skill, but more to do with a businessman’s ability to mold you into something marketable. Do you have strong opinions? Are you a thinking person? Do you have a vision or desire other than making money [for others]? The Establishment cannot use…
  • #PsalmQuest 47 progress 5: a little thing

    SPB
    15 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Click on the image to enlarge   A little thing can make a big difference. Take, for example, a small, delicate triangle. In the passage above the intent was for the triangle to add a little off-beat foot-tapping liveliness, but in fact it turned out to be an interference. Its timbre (quality of sound) did not fit with the what the brass instruments are playing, even though it is made of metal itself. Even the bass drum part was altered slightly – instead of playing every other bar it now plays every bar, as in the example above. It fits. It makes a big difference, yet is such a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Amati Magazine

  • EDITOR’S BRUNCH: NICOLA BENEDETTI AND LEONARD ELSCHENBROICH

    Jessica Duchen
    2 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Amati is delighted to present a substantial interview with Nicola Benedetti and her partner, cellist Leonard Elschenbroich – the first non-filmed one they have given together. Over a lavish West London brunch they tell Jessica Duchen about helping one another, finding your own pace, and practising in the bathroom   Nicola Benedetti and Leonard Elschenbroich. Photo by Jane Lawrence   Nicola Benedetti and Leonard Elschenbroich cut quite a couple, charismatic even off duty as they wander together into Annie’s Restaurant in Barnes well before lunchtime. Time to stop, eat…
  • Young Artist of the Week: Owain Park, composer, conductor and organist

    Amati Q&#38;A
    29 Jul 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Owain Park is organ scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge, and still an undergraduate – but he has already been signed by Novello, which has published more than 20 of his pieces so far. He tells us how it has happened… How did you first get interested in music and begin to play and compose? Although I apparently showed musical promise from a young age, the main reason my mum bought a piano from a second hand shop round the corner was so that she knew where I was, as she could listen out and know if I wasn’t on the piano stool! I started to play the piano about age seven, and…
  • FEATURE: A complete celebration

    John Riley
    26 Jul 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The Carducci String Quartet is giving the first-ever performance of the complete Shostakovich string quartets in a single day, on the 40th anniversary of the composer’s death. Shostakovich expert John Riley talks to them…    The Carducci String Quartet Record companies have long dabbled in ‘completism’, releasing the collected works of various composers, the complete recordings of this or that performer, or even sets of discs from favourite labels. For performers it’s not always so easy: cycles of Beethoven piano sonatas or string quartets spread over several…
  • BLOG: Happy summer!

    Jessica Duchen
    25 Jul 2015 | 10:36 am
    This magnificent ‘Strad in the Sand’ appeared on the beach at the East Neuk Festival last month – and well might it. Even the most dedicated stringers need a bit of a break now and then and musicians find some interesting ways to let off steam in their spare time. We in the Amati Magazine have quite a variety of preferences between us. Jamie and Sarah Buchanan, our doughty proprietors, are heading for the Outer Hebrides, which makes East Neuk seem relatively close. Richard Bratby has been Hapsburg-hopping in Budapest; Claudia Pritchard has been sunning herself in Italy; and…
  • YOUNG ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Martin James Bartlett, pianist

    Amati Q&#38;A
    22 Jul 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The winner of the latest BBC Young Musician of the Year makes his Proms debut on 9 August – and he has a plea for the future of music education   Martin, how did you first get interested in music and start to play?  My mother studied at music college and used to play the piano regularly at home, so I was accustomed to the sound from a very young age. When I was six she started teaching me and I gained a place at the Royal College of Music a year later. Which teachers and musicians have influenced you most so far?  I have only had a few teachers in my life. I studied with Emily…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    CMUSE

  • How and how long should you practise? Violinist Itzhak Perlman weighs in

    Angelica Frey
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    “Practise slowly” is the most common advice violinist Itzhak Perlman gives children whenever they ask him for his autograph. Practising slowly, he continues on The Strad, means forgetting things slowly, whereas relying on quickness can work in the short term but ends up being counterproductive in the long run. He then elaborates on the practice schedule that made him the violinist he is today: his maestro was jokingly dubbed a “scale fiend” (which does not actually mean he was a scaled creature like, say, a dragon) and, as a consequence, young Itzhak would devote one hour per day to…
  • This violin survived the sinking of the Titanic (almost) unscathed and will soon be on display

    Angelica Frey
    1 Aug 2015 | 6:49 am
    Let’s take a moment to talk about Titanic and the music associated with it. I am not talking about the sensual “Rose” theme or the wistful Hymn to the Sea which, by the way, are variations of the same leitmotif that is eventually fully expanded into Celine Dion’s My Heart Will Go On (RIP James Horner) I never shed a tear for Rose jumping back onto the ship after securing a lifeboat, nor did I lose my composure at Jack’s demise, when we saw his purplish-tinted lifeless body partially lying on the piece of debris where Rose was quite comfortably resting and humming. However, I…
  • 5 Reasons Classical Music Isn’t Dying

    Tom Head
    30 Jul 2015 | 7:10 am
    Moldovan violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja Over the past few years, U.S. and European media have been predicting classical music’s death with a regularity usually reserved for elderly heads of state and religious leaders. Putting aside the question of whether an entire genre of music can actually “die” (even disco still has its fans), there are five reasons why classical music is doing especially *well* these days—well enough, in fact, that you don’t really have to worry about its future. 1. China is changing everything. Most articles predicting the death of…
  • Marija & Julijana Bring Powerful Piano Duo To Latin Jazz Cover

    D Grant Smith
    28 Jul 2015 | 4:59 am
    Marija & Julijana continue to impress music fans in a variety of ways, and in a variety of genres including Latin jazz. Picking up where we last mentioned them, this piano duo covers Sway With Me. The song was originally a mambo written in 1953 by Mexican composers Luis Demetrio and Pablo Beltran Ruiz, made famous by Rat Pack singer Dean Martin. This Latin jazz piano cover does more than add a dueling nature to the mambo, it captures the heart of the original song with added breadth and intrigue. The improvisational Latin jazz piece accompanied by strings and percussion accents the vast…
  • Uriel Herman Quartet Amazes With Jazz And Dance Video

    D Grant Smith
    28 Jul 2015 | 4:25 am
    In just a little over 6 minutes Uriel Herman will take you on a ride across the emotional spectrum. This Israeli jazz quartet’s Winter Light video puts you in the presence of the band as a witness to the beauty of the music. Accompanying the performance are flashes of the brilliant dance of Sian Olles. A moderate piano builds to a jazz crescendo building to an impassioned musical trek through excitement and glory, bringing us back down to a light resolve. The piece is wonderfully captured by Bettina Fienstatnt, creator of the acclaimed series Indie City. As the piece progresses, bass…
Log in